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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Monday, March 7, 1994 



No. 34,529 


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53 


Clinton White House Sinks Further Into White water 

Damage Control’ In the Center: 

The First Lady 


Has Backfired 


, v. rn^.vvy— ■ - • ■•• 


By Ann Devroy and Ruth Marcus 

Washington Pm Service 

. Yk^!S!F TON — When President Bill Clinton reluc- 
tonuy agreed to the appointment of a special counsel on 
E”!*™ J *»iaiy, to most compelling argument was 
uiat an independent investigation would shield the presi- 
dent from further political battering and free him to 
pursue the change he promised the nation. 

Less loan two months later, Mr. Clinton and his While 
House staff fmd themselves deeper in a hole than when 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

diey started. By even their own accounts, it is a hole they 
dug themselves. 

With the appointment of a special counsel. Robert B. 
riske Jr., the White House expected the complex set of 
land transactions, legal maneuvering} and interconnecting 
stones known as Whitewater to move off the front pages 
and into the secrecy of a federal investigation. 

The opposite has occurred. 

The Clinton White House has created a new, more easily 
understood and far more damaging story line: the specter 
of White House interference with investigations of the 
Clintons. The forced resignation of the White House 
counsel, Bernard W. Nussbaum, on Saturday and the 
subpoenas served on six top While House aides and four 
senior Treasury Department officials make Whitewater a 
more dramatic story. 

“ ‘Grand jury* and ‘subpoenas' are words that are very 
fraught** with suspicion in the public mind, caid one 
administration official. For a president whose current 
standing is high but whose reservoir of public trust is not 
deep, “this is a very perilous time for us,” the official said. 

Many in the White House agree that the Whitewater 
riamagMmuml operation has ended up wining more 
damage than it has controlled. 

According to senior White House officials, outside 
Democrats and others, the route from questions about the 
Clintons' 1980s investments in an Arkansas land develop- 
ment venture called Whitewater Development Corp. to a 
special counsel and FBI agents walking the White House 
halls with subpoenas is littered with official blunders. 

The result has been a White House that is struggling 

See STAFF, Page 3 


By Maureen Dowd 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Subpoenas and suspicions are fly- 
ing. Everybody in Washington and Arkansas suddenly 
seems to be investigating and blaming everybody else. 

The president is having troubles, again, and the first 
lady is not just a supportive spouse, standing by ber man 
with a glazed smile. Hillary Rodham Clinton herself, is 
smack at the heart of the matter. 

Bernard W. Nussbaum, the first lady's old friend and 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

mentor, was pushed off the sled of state Saturday, after 
President Bill Qinton’s admiss ion that the White House 
counsel had made improper contacts to review the status 
of a confidential federal investigation into an Arkansas 
savings and loan related to the Whitewater affair. 

But if Mr. Nussbaum sinned, some contend, it was only 
in being too loyal to his prince and princess. 

“There's no evidence he’s done anything contrary to the 
Clintons' direction,” said William KristoL the director of 
the Project for the Republican Future. “The Clintons have 
an extraor dinar y inability to distinguish public from pri- 
vate, official from personal” 

Senior Clinton aides tried to invoke the classic Washing- 
ton “Beckett” defense, saying that although the Clintons 
may have wanted to be rid of their meddlesome problems, 
they did not want the rules broken. 

Mr. Nussbaum, who has been quoted as saying that he 
felt he had two clients — BOl and Hillary Clinton — 
“sometimes went the extra mfle as a way of ingratiating 
hims elf with Hillary, even though that was not always what 
she wanted,” a Clinton aide said. 

Problems are piling up for the first lady. Mrs. Clinton 
and the three lawyers she brought to top jobs in the 
administration — Mr. Nussbaum; Vincent W. Foster Jr„ 
his deputy, who committed suicide last summer, and 
Associate Attorney Genoa! Webster L HubbeH — are 
enmeshed in embarrassing ethical questions. 

The Rose Law Firm in Little Rock, Arkansas, where 
Mrs. CKnton, Mr. Foster and Mr. Hubbell were partners, 
is being investigated by the special prosecutor for the 
Whitewater affair about document-shredding and govern - 

See HILLARY, Page 3 



I Sam AppMnWTht Arabitcd Pirn 

President Qinton crossing a White House lawn as be prepared to leave for Camp David over the weekend. 




Gore Defends President but Concedes That Blunders Were Made 


Was hi ngton Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Top White House officials, includ- 
ing Vice President Ai Gore, went on television news 
programs on Sunday to assert that the White House had 
built a “fire wall” to guard a g ainst further “mistakes” in 
the handlmg of the Wtrilewaier issue. - 

Mr. Gore and the White House senior adviser, George 
Stephanopdous, accused Republicans of exploiting the 
issue for partisan gain. 

But Senator Phil Gramm, Republican of Texas, and 
others said President Bill Clinton was “digging himself 


into a hole” by allowing staff briefings on the issue and by 
having the White House counsel, Bernard W. Nussbaum, 
interfere in the investigations of a failed Arkansas savings 
and loan and its connections to Whitewater, the defunct 
land-development corporation in which the Clintons had 
an interest.-- — 

Mr. Gore, appearing on the NBC News program “Meet 
the Press,” said a series of memos issued last week to the 
White House staff hamwng discussions with outride agen- 
cies on the Whitewater and Madison Guaranty matters 
had built a “fire wall” that would protect against interfer- 


ence, or the appearance of interference, in the issue. 

“We will have the highest ethical standards in this White 
House,” he said. 

Mr. Gore admitted that the White House had made 
mistakes in allowing, on three occasions, senior officials to 
have briefings by Treasuty^Dcpartmect officials that in- 
cluded the status of the Resolution Trust Co. investigation 
into the failure of the Madison Guaranty Savings and 
Loan. 

The Resolution Trust Co. asked the Justice Department 
in October to pursueacriminal investigation in connection 


with the failure of Madison, and named the Clin tons as 
possible beneficiaries of iHegal Madison practices. But the 
Clintons were not cited for any wrongdoing in the request 
The White House and Treasury officials involved m the 
. three discussions were snbpoenaedby Robert B. Fiske Jr., 
to Whitewater special counsel la part because. of his role 
in all three meetings, Mr. Nussbaum was forced to resign 
on Saturday, but will remain in office until April 5. 

Mr. Gore and Mr. Stephanopdoas said Republicans 

See CLINTON, Page 3 


Behind Beijing Arrests, the View That Stability Is Everything 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

New York Times Service 

BEIJING — The preemptive arrest of a doz- 
en or more pro-democracy leaders in recent 
days is a timely reminder that C hina ’s Commu- 
nist rulers command a huge security apparatus 
that, for now, remains unable to tolerate any 
challenge to Communist Party authority. 

It now seems possible that China's leaders 
are considering important concessions on hu- 
man rights this winter to main lam harmonious 
trade relations with the United Suites. 

As a reminder of American interest in the 


outcome, John Shattuck, the assistant U.S. sec- 
retary of state for human rights, said the deten- 
tions were “matters of deep concern to the U.S. 
government” 

“We will raise them at the highest level 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

through Secretary of State Warren Christo- 
pher, said Mr. Shattuck, who spoke to report- 
ers in Hong Kong. Mr. Christopher is to visit 

though the new arrests may appear to be 


an affront to the Clinton administration's push 
for more progress on human rights, they also 
reflect the mounting tension in Chinese society 
as democracy activists begin to stir from the 
long dormancy that followed tire massacre near 
Tiananmen Square in June 1989. 

China's leaders blow that the economic 
boom they have unleashed is creating new de- 
mands for political reform while also breaking 
down some of the control mechanism for main- 
taining mass ideological conformance. And 
they know that in the last decade, any Chinese 
leader who took the country down the road of 
democratic change lost his job. 


For now, even in this season of emphasis on 
human rights, the security forces that keep the 
Communist Party in power are enforcing a 
totalitarian sense of public order, even when it 
risks damaging China's foreign relations. 

This guiding philosophy comes from no less 
than Deng Xiaoping, 89. the country’s senior 
leader, wire has admonished the younger gener- 
ation of leaders hoping to replace him that 
stability is everything, that democracy leads to 
chaos, and that one should never fear cracking 
down on dissidents and never wonry about what 
the outside world thinks of it 


The arrests continued Sunday. 

Thai W rimbi- one of the student leaders of 
the 1989 pro-democracy demonstrations, was 
snatched off the street by a carload of plain- 
clothes policemen in Beijing's university dis- 
trict, bis friends said. Another report said Ma 
Shaofang, also a pro-democracy leader, had 

See CHINA, Page 2 


Five American journalists are taken to see a 
nearly deserted Chinese pend colony. Page 1 


Calls Mount 
In Israel to 
Evict Settlers 
From Hebron 

Nearly Half the Cabinet 
Believe Enclave Poses 
Needless Security Risk 

By Clyde Haberman 

New York Tunes Service 

JERUSALEM — Pressure intensified within 
the Israeli government on Sunday to dear Jew- 
ish settlers out of the tinderbox West Bank 
town of Hebron, where worshiping Palestinians 
were massacred at a mosque on Feb. 25. 

At the weekly cabinet meeting, nearly half 
the members — seven — were reported to have 
spoken out against keeping the Hebron en- 
claves where about 400 Jews live among more 
than 70,000 Arabs, creating what some minis- 
ters called needless frictions and security risks. 
Only two of the 15 minis ters opposed removing 
the settlers. 

But other members did not state their views, 
and no decision was made. And in the end there 
is really only opinion that counts, that of Prime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who did not speak on 
the matter on Sunday. He has, however, op- 
posed any tinkering with settlements now as a 
surefire source of domestic divisiveness that 
would disrupt peace talks with the Palestinians 
even more than they already have been by the 
massacre. 

Still the readiness of centrist ministers, and 
not just those on the left, to advocate evicting 
some of the most ideologically fervent settlers 
in the occupied territories suggests that a na- 
tional consensus may be building to reconsider 
policies that go back many years. 

Senior government officials are talking far 
differently than they did before a Jewish settler 
gunned down Muslims at prayer last month. 
The consequences may ultimately be felt by all 
130,000 Israelis living in 140 communities in 
the territories. 

“So long as they are still there, 1 believe the 
thing itself creates friction and draws fire,” said 
Hooting Minister Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, a for- 
mer West Bank army commander who is dose 
to Mr. Rabin, in explaining why he wants to 
end the Jewish presence in Hebron. 

Immigration Minister YairTsaban said: “To 
guard the settlers in the midst or the Palestinian 
population in Hebron, we need to put many 
forces there.” 

Hie ministers reportedly were told by the 
West Bank commander. Major General Danny 
Yatom, that 1,000 Lo 1,500 soldiers are needed 
to protect the Jews in Hebron. They are said to 
number only 42 families and unmarried yeshiva 
students, for a total of about 400 people. 

Opposing any change in the status quo. Eco- 
nomics Minister Shimon Shelreet warned that 
it would mean reopening the outline agreement 
on introducing Palestinian self-rule that Israel 
and the Palestine Liberation Organization 
signed in September. “If we evacuate Hebron, 
then why not from other places?” he said. 
“There are many places where the friction be- 
tween Arabs and Jews is great" 

Less than a year after Israd captured the 
territories in the 1967 Middle East war, and in 
defiance of official Labor government policy, 
Jewish families moved into a hotel in central 
Hebron. They were led by Rabbi Mosbe Le- 

See ISRAEL, Page 2 


Kiosk 



H* AnodMcd Piw/IWJ 

MELINA MERCOURI DIES — Me- 
fina Mercouri, 70, the Greek culture 
minister and actress, died Sunday m 
New York of tang cancer. Page 2- 

Burma Feels Out 
Nobel Laureate 

General Khin Nyunt, to he*l of Brn- 
mese militaiy intelligence, said ^^ 
that he had seat senior military officersto 
men with Daw Aung San Suu .Kw 
democracy leader and winner of the Nobe 
Peace Prize who is held under 

He said her attitude had been negative 

and counterproductive." 

Page 5. 

** page5. 

Book Review __ 

Newssta nd Prices — __ — 

Andorra 9.00 FF 

Antilles 11.20 FF oSS?“;.8.« Rials 

CameroofU^OoCFA ....11.20 FF 

Egypt E - p - 5 2® Saudi Arobia.J.ofjR- 

France. — -FJOPF Senegal •■«£?£ *5 

Gabon. — -W£5J: A Spain. MOPTAjj 

Greece 300 Dr. Tunisia ....1-000 


Zhirinovsky’s Stunning Rise: Anonymous Lawyer to Political Bad Boy 


By Lee Hocks tad er 

Washington Post Service 

MOSCOW — In 1990, a political nobody stood up in a 
huge auditorium at a publishing house in Moscow and 
addressed the hundreds of workers there in a raspy voice. 
After seven years as an employee, be wanted to become the 
company’s new director. 

The employee, Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, was a 44-year- 
old lawyer, well known among the workers but not particu- 
larly weD liked. There were five candidates for the director- 
ship When the votes were counted. Mr. Zhirinovsky came 
out near the bottom of the list, collecting a couple of dozen 
votes out of 500 casL Shortly after that, he quit to try his 
hand at a new line of work: extremist politics. 


A year later, Mr. Zhirinovsky placed third in Russia's first 
free presidential election, with 6 million votes. 

Despite his abundant publicity, the stay of Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky’s rise from anonymous lawyer to political bad boy has 

The fast trainload of Ukraura nudear warheads to be 
ifignantkd arrives in Russia. Page 7. 

been told only spottQv, and it relies heavily on his own 
rfliripflig n autobiography. 

In interviews, Mr. Zhirinovsky’s former classmates, col- 
leagues and supervisors shed light on episodes in his career 
before his stunning political success. The interviews derail 
his stormy, often erratic behavior, his difficulties in forming 


lasting professional relationships and his unquenchable 
thirst for attention, as well as his considerable energy and 
oiganizational zeal. 

More than any politician since Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Mr. 
Zhirinovsky has forced officials from Washington to War- 
saw to re think their policies toward Russia. 

• His rhetoric often seems wild: He warns of a secret new 
Russian weapon of annihila tion: he threatens to use nudear 
weapons to destroy Japan and Germany, and huge fans to 
blow radiation at the Baltic states: he vows that Russian 
soldiers will march south to the Indian Ocean. At borne, be 
wants militar y courts to arrest “criminals" and execute them 
on the spot 

The world has taken note. 


Well before he turned to politics. Mr. Zhirinovsky had 
compiled a record in his professional career that, although 
anonymous, was in some ways as contentious and as 
touched by controversy as his more public political exploits. 

According to his former associates, Mr. Zhirinovsky regu- 
larly denounced the Soviet Communist Party but also tried 
to join and became enraged when he did not succeed. He 
made extravagant promises to his co-workers to court their 
support, only to be spurned tty them when it counted. And 
be was forced to change jobs in his mid- 30s when he 
allegedly accepted what his superiors considered to be an 
■oper gift from a client. 

an interview, Mr. Zhirinovsky denied the accounts of 

See RISE, Page 5 


A $500,000 Dream Car 
Has YettoTumthe Comer 

global economic downturn, automotive experts 
believe Bugatti Automobili Sp A has found pre- 
cious few customers since the first car rolled off 
the assembly line 16 months ago, and they 
question how much longer its fi n anc ial backers 

.4.^. U. twtn’t name — C&Q bold 


By Jacques Neher 

international Herald Tribune 

CAMPOGALLIANO, Italy — On Srot, 15, 
1991, in a glittering ceremony at the Pal ace of 
Versailles, Romano AitioH, a fanner Ferrari 
dealer from northern Italy, proudly unveiled 
the Bugatti EB-110, billed as the fastest, most 
technically refined road car in the world. 

It was the 110th anniversary erf the birth of 
Ettore Bugatti, and the 560-hotsepower car, to 
cost over $500,000 and hit a top speed of 35 1 
kilometers (219 miles) per hour, was Mr. Aruo- 
ITs way of honoring the French inventor who 
had forged a reputation between the wars for 
designing a line of racing cars still revered by 
members of Bugatti dubs around the globe. 

But after pouring 120 billion lire (more than 
$70 million) into a state-of-the-art factory and 
y^neing several French industrial giants such 
as Elf Aquitaine SA, Aerospatiale SA and Mi- 
chdin SA into contributing advanced technot- 
ogjes for to so-called supercar, Mr. Artioli's 
bid to “re-awaken” to Bugatti brand is gener- 
ating as much doubt as horsepower. 

With spending on prestige products and col- 
lectible items in sharp decline because of the 


— whom Mr. Artioli won't name 

° U Mr. ArtiaH says he has sold 81 cats so far and 
that the company is headed for profit this year, 

but he has not been able to convince ouisutas. 

“It's incredible," said Panl Frere. a highly 
respected writer for Road & Track, the Ameri- 
can auto magazine. Tye never seen a start-up 
car company working like this for seven years 
without any return.” 

The questions in to automotive trade pros 
became even more pointed last fall after to 
company’s mysterious parent holding compa- 
ny, the Luxembourg-rrastoed Bugatti Intw- 
natjpgal, bought Lotus Group, to British mak- 
er of sports cars, for an undisclosed amount 
from General Motors Corp. GM had purchased 
Lotus in 1986 for an estimated $30 million. 

“We’re all asking to question," said Gerard 
Flocon, editor in chief erf to French magaz i n e 

See BUGATTI, Page 7 



Onto BtamkrtheABoriacd hot 

MUZZLED — A Croatian soldier covering the barrel of a howitzer to be turned over to UN troops in Vitez, Bosnia. Pfcge 5. 


t 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 7, 1994 


Burma Feeling Out Dissident 

But Top General Calk Her Attitude 'Negative' 


By Philip Shenon 

Nem York Tima Service 1 
RANGOON, Burma — The 
powerful head of Burmese military 
intelligence. Lieutenant General 
Khin Nyunt, said Sunday that he 
had dispatched senior military offi- 
cers in recent weeks to meet with 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi the im- 
prisoned democracy leader and 
Nobel Peace Prize recipient, but 
that her attitude toward his envoys 
had been “negative and counter- 
productive.” 

In an interview. General Khin 
Nyunt, who is widely seen here as 
the most powerful member of the 
junta that runs Burma, ruled out 
the possibility of early talks be- 
tween himself and Daw Aung San 
Suu Kyi who is now in her fifth 
year of house arrest. He said that 
face-to-face discussions might be 
possible eventually, but that “this 
is a matter that is delicate, a matter 
on which we must ponder deeply.” 

He offered no timetable for fur- 
ther talks with Daw Aung San Suu 
Kyi or for her release, and be re- 
peatedly questioned her legitimacy 
as a political leader, her popularity 
among the Burmese public — even 
her patriotism. 

The general described her sup- 
porters as being “only from out- 
side” Burma. “She has been por- 
trayed as a great leader of the 
country basically by groups outside 
of the country,” he said. 

Despite his harsh words for the 
democracy leader, diplomats said 
the disclosure by General Khin 
Nyunt that his envoys had met with 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi after her 
meetings last month with an Amer- 
ican lawmaker suggested that the 
junta was considering a dialogue 
with bar. 

The general's interview Sunday 
was his first with a Western news 
organization in two years. 

Hie possibility of direct talks be- 
tween the general and Daw Aung 
San Suu Kyi was raised by the 
congressman. Representative Bill 
Richardson, Democrat of New 
Mexico, a member of the House 
Intelligence Committee who last 
month became the first nonfamQy 
foreign visitor to see the democracy 
leader since 1989. Daw Aung San 
Suu Kyi immediately accepted the 

offer of talks. 

General Khin Nyunt said it 
would be impossible for him to 
consider a dialogue with Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi until after there 


had been full deliberations within 
the junta, which calls itself the 
State Law and Order Restoration 
Council and within government 
agencies overseen by the military. 

“This is a very complex matter, 
and we will have to take many 
factors into account — natio nal 
politics, international relations,” he 
said. “This is not something that 1 
alone can decide.” 

He said it was also 
that the junta not be seen asl 
to the demands of foreign govern- 
ments. “It would not be good or 
appropriate that we do this or that 
because or external pressure, be- 
cause the United States says this or 
that,” he said. 

The general emphasized, howev- 
er, that Burma was eager for better 
relations with Washington, which 
has led the international communi- 
ty in efforts to isolate the junta over 
its human-rights record. “We wish 
to go back to a good relationship," 
he said. 

During and after the visit from 
Mr. Richardson in mid-February, 
Genera] Khin Nyunt said, be dis- 
patched “senior officers to meet 


with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi on my 
behalf.” 

“Our impression,” be said, “is 
that she doesn’t think much of us, 
and so 1 think that she doesn't want 
to be serious.” 

He said her attitude “on all these 
occasions was rather negative and 
counterproductive.” 

General Khin Nyunt is de- 
scribed by diplomats here as a 
highly intelligent, if calculating, 
military commander who is the 
first among equals in the junta, 
which assumed complete govern- 
ment power in 1988 in a violent 
crackdown on followers of Daw 
Aung San Suu Kyi 

She was placed under house ar- 
rest in July 1989 as part of a crack- 
down of the democracy movement, 
which, the government asserts, was 
actually under the control of Bur- 
mese Communists. 

Diplomats say that from 2,000 to 
5,000 followers of Daw Aung San 
Suu Kyi were killed in 1988 at the 
beginning of the crackdown. In 
1991, she was awarded the Nobel 
Peace Prize for her efforts to re- 
store democracy to Burma. 



ATTENTIVE EX-LEADER — Fatos Nano, a . 

Socialist Party, at b eginning of his trial in Tirana- He is accused of misappropriating state finds. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Britain Urged to Hit Bads at Malaysia 


LONDON (Reuters) — The Sunday Times newspaper, whose repon. . _ 
ing angered Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad of Malaysia into 



of a dam jn Malay sia to put pressure on Mr. Mahathir who it said 
enjoyed attacking Britain. Last week, Mr. Mahathir barred British 
companies from government contracts after The Sunday Times reptffid 
an alleged plan by a big British company to bribe hhn. 

On Sunday, Malaysia announced that it would ban foreign journal?^ 
who have written reports about Malaysia that the government considers 
false, a senior official said. j 




• "r“ r 


EU and Norway Meet on Membership 


BRUSSELS (Reuter) — Norway resumed talks on European Unifo 
membership on Sunday, facing intense pressure to meet EU demands on 
fishing rights. 

Austria, F inlan d and Sweden agreed to membership deals last week. 
But Spain says there is no question of Oslo’s joining unless H .gives 
Spanish fishermen access to Norwegian fishing grounds. Norway fears a 
“no” vote in a referendum on membership if it makes concessions on 
fishing. , 

EU and Norwegian negotiators were seeking Sunday to finaliw details 
of a deal on fanning and to resolve other issues, such as Norway’s 
decision to resume minke whaling in defiance of an international and EU 
ban. Additional negotiations are scheduled for Tuesday, two days bcfojre 
the deadline for a deal that would allow Norway to join the other three 
countries in becoming EU members by Jan. 1, 1995. 



«, te 


Bavarian Vote Hands Kohl a Setback 


Chinese Put Nearly Empty Penal Camp on Stage 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

New York Tima Service 

LINGYUAN, China — As Chi- 
na comes under growing pressure 
over its treatment of prisoners, five 
American journalists were taken on 
a tour of a nearly deserted penal 
colony in an attempt by the govern- 
ment to demonstrate greater open- 
ness about h uman rights at such 
places. 

The focus of the visit, to the 


Lingyuan No. 2 labor reform camp 
in the mt 


in tne mountains 325 kilometers 
(200 miles) northeast of Beijing, 
was Liu Gang, 33, a democracy 
campaigner who helped organize 
the Tiananmen Square protests of 
1 989 and who has accused the pris- 
on authorities of torture. 

But instead of bong allowed to 
investigate the accusation, the jour- 
nalists were treated to a choreo- 
graphed tour on Friday. 

They walked through empty dor- 
mitories, through empty mess halls, 
through empty classrooms, through 
an auditorium, where an inmate 
dance troupe was performing to the 


song “Bad” by Michael Jackson, 
and through a noisy truck factory. 

Model prisoners talked about 
being refonned through their labor, 
while some guards listened and 
other guards recorded their re- 
marks on videotape. 

In the visiting room, where fam- 
ilies get one hour a month to see 
imprisoned relatives, DongZheyun 
was there to see her husband,' who 
was serving time for theft. 

When reporters entered the 
doorway, she said, “Every time I 
come, the first thing he says to me 
is that the cadres are so good to him 
they are like parents.” 

When her husband tried to ex- 
press a few lines of praise for the 
prison authorities, a guard inter- 
rupted him to say, “You got that 
backwards.” 

Then his wife interjected on his 
behalf: “Oh, he’s so stupid! He 
doesn’t have any education at alL” 

By then the reporters were being 
asked to hurry to the next stop on 
the tour. 

Mr. Liu is among several politi- 


cal prisoners in China whose medi- we don’t let him meet with any- 
cal condition has drawn interna- one.” 

tional expressions of concern, Prison officials offered to take 
including most recently a letter to reporters to where Mr. Liu was 
President Jiang Zemin from 54 bong held and make “exclusive” 

-- L_.l “ J. 


There, through the smoked {glass 
window overlooking the prison 
yard, the reporters saw a self -con- 
" lr. liu we 


United States senators. 

As a physics student and democ- 
racy advocate, Mr. Liu was drawn 
into the orbit of Fang Lizhi and his 
wife, Li Shuxian, physicists who 
took refuge in the U.S. Embassy in 
Beijing in 1989 and now live in 
exile. 

Through their speeches and writ- 
ing, the couple helped energize a 
new intellectual movemott m the 
1980s, promoting democratic 
change to coincide with the eco- 
nomic opening begun by Deng 


rove” he 
had not 


was in good health 
been tortured. 

For the prison authorities, the 
high point of the day came when 
the warden suddenly interrupted 
his briefing on how prisoners are 
reformed through “love and nur- 
turing care.” If the reporters would 
care to step to the window of the 
conference room, he said, they 
might catch a glimpse of Mr. Lin 


srious Mr. Liu wearing a 
uniform and being escorted along a 
sidewalk by a prison officer. 

In a few seconds, be was gone. 
The warden returned to a video 
presentation showing him in vari- 
ous animated activities. 


MUNICH (AP) — The opposition dealt another blow to Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl's coalition Sunday in local elections in Bavaria. 

Mayors from the opposition Social Democrats were re-elected in 
Bayreuth, Hof, Rothenburg and Aschaffenbutg by margins of at least 3 to 
1 over the Christian Social Union. The conservative Christian Socjal 
Union lost control of Bamberg, a town of 70,000 people, and its 
candidates faced runoffs in Freising, Bad Rdchenhal), Lindau and 
Landsberg. 

The voting in Bavaria, Germany’s largest state, was the first ina string 
of elections this year that culminate in the OcL 16 federal elections. WhQe 
the voting on Sunday was relatively minor, the poor showing of the 
Christian Social Union underlined a negative trend for the government 


“Among so many criminals, we 
chose to let you see clips from Liu 
Gaul’s life in order that you could 
see his healthy condition,” the war- 
den said. “If he had been abused, 
would he be this healthy today?” 


Xiaoping, China’s senior trader. 
After th 



the military crackdown in 
June 1989, Mr. Liu, who had 
helped organize student demon- 
strations, was No. 3 on the list of 21 
student leaders most wanted by the 
authorities. 

After his arrest, he was sen- 
tenced on Feb. 12, 1991, to six 
years in prison for “conspiracy to 
subvert the government” 

The warden, Xin Tingquan, re- 
fused to allow the visiting journal- 
ists to interview Mr. Liu, saying it 
was a violation of regulations. He 
acknowledged that the Ministry of 
Justice made one exception to this 
rule last year so a Communist Party 
magazine reporter could interview 
Mr. Liu and pronounce him in the 
state-con troflfid press a “malcon- 
tent convict.” 

“We’re not afraid of letting you 
see him,” Mr. Xin said, “but Liu 
Gang distorts the truth. That’s why 


CHINA: No Challenges Tolerated 


Cbatinaed from Page I 
“disappeared" and was believed to 
be in detention. 

Wei Jingsheng, China's most 
prominent dissident, who was de- 
tained for about 30 hours Friday 
and Saturday, was free Sunday, but 
left the capital for what his secre- 
tary said would be a few days of 
resL 

For the Communist Party, re- 
pression of democratic forces has 
oeea a survival issue, because as 
many advocates of democracy con- 
tend. the first step in China's politi- 
cal reform is to overthrow one-par- 
ty rule. 

Many of today’s leaders, includ- 
ing Mr. Deng and Prime Minister 
Li Peng, ordered and supervised 
the 1 989 crackdown. Their political 
primacy depends on maintaining 


their “victcuy” over the students 
and workers who were cut down by 
the tanks and maf-hmp- guns. 

On Sunday, there were indica- 
tions for the first time that democ- 
racy campaigners in Beijing were 
preparing petitions to distribute 
during Mr. Christopher’s visit. 

There has also been speculation 
in recent days that Mr. Wei would 
like to meet with Mr. Christopher. 
Such a meeting still seemed possi- 
ble even with Mr. Wei’s departure 
Sunday. 

A meeting with the American 
secretary of state could only add to 
Mr. Wei's protection and stature as 
an uncompromising and articulate 
advocate for human rights and de- - 
mocracy. IBs decision to go into 
hiding this weekend may weD be in 
anticipation of such a meeting. 


Soros to Buy Radio Free Europe? 

PRAGUE (AFP) — The financier George Soros is negotiating to bay 
the U.S. -financed Radio Free Europe and its archives, a Czech newspaper 
reported, saying the talks were at an “advanced stage.” 

under the deal, the radio station would be transferred from Munichto 
Prague or Budapest and would serve as the basis for a newly created press 
agency and school for journalism, the newspaper said, citing Mr. Sons. 

Radio Free Europe was an important Source of independent informa- 
tion in Eastern Europe during the period of Co mmunis t rule. It accumu- 
lated a wealth of archive material on tire history of communism. >ir. 
Soros, who was bran in Hungary, financed numerous dissident groups 
and clandestine activities during the same period through a foundation tk 
established. ! 



Sixth Body Found at English House 


GLOUCESTER, England (Reuters) — British policemen on Sunday 
unearthed what they beheve is the body of a sixth person at the home of a 
man already charged with three murders. ‘ 

The suspected human remains were discovered in the cellar of a thiee- 
story house that tabloid newspapers have dubbed the “House of Horror.” 
The police unearthed the corpses last week of three women in the gaidai 
of the house and on Saturday discovered two more sets of remains when 
they started excavations in the building itself. 

Frederick West, 52, a builder with 10 children from two marriages, bps 
been charged with murdering his teenage daughter Heather, who van- 
ished seven years ago at the age of 16. He has also been accused of killing 
another teenager, Shirley Robinson, a lodger at his house who vps 
pregnant when she died, and an unknown woman believed to be in her 
early 20s. ’ 



Away From Pciiti 


tint 


l/.z 


Melina Mercouri, Actress, Is Dead 


By Peter B. Flint 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Melina Mer- 
couri, the vivacious Greek actress 
with a husky, explosive laugh 
whose greatest success was as a 
flamboyant prostitute in the 1960 
film “Never on Sunday,” died Sun- 
day at the Memorial Sloan-Kctter- 
ing Cancer Center of hxng cancer. 
She was 70 years old. 

The actress was a passionate 
anti-Fasdst who lost her citizen- 
ship and property in 1967 for her 
aggressive opposition to the junta 
that held power in Athens for seven 
years, until 1974. She then returned 


wrote and produced, most of Miss 
Mercouri's nearly 20 other movies, 
including “He Who Must Die" 
(1957), about life overtaking a Pas- 
sion play in a primitive village on 
Crete that Mr. Dassin co-adapted 
from the novel “The Greek Pas- 
sion,” by Nikos Kazan tzakis. Other 
joint efforts included “Phaedra,” a 
1961 tale of a woman lusting for 
Ip stepson, and “A Dream of Pa*- 
si on,” a 1978 variation of Medea’s 
child-murders, that were inspired 
by ancient Greek dramas. 

Their other team efforts included 


“Topkapl" a well-regarded 1964 
museum-theft caper; "10:30 PAL 
Sammer,” a 1966 story of a descent 
into alcoholism and “Promise at 
Dawn” (1970), from a memoir by 
Romain Gary about his unconven- 
tional mother. 

Miss Mercouri conquered 
Broadway in a 1967-68 musical ad- 
aptation of “Never on Sunday” ti- 
tled “Ulya Darting,” prompting 
Walter Kerr of The New York 
Times to hail her as “a creature 
you’d be happy to take home to 
mother, if mother was out.” 


Heseltme Denies Opposing Major 

LONDON (Reuters) — Michael Heseltine, the Conservative cabinet 
minister who helped topple former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, 
insisted on Sunday that he had no interest in challenging Prime Minister 
John Major. , 

After a week of speculation in the press and among members of 
Parliament that be was gearing up for a bid to lead 3a party, Mr. 
Heseltine pledged his allegiance to the embattled Mr. Major. 

you quite categorically, I think John Major will remain in 


Tm 


place," Mr. Heseltine said on BBC radio. *Tm not prepared to be 
involved in any speculation about my own position because I intend to go 
on helping him to win the electoral battles the Conservative Party wjll 
fight, and I believe he will do that and be win actually lead us to victory at 
the next election.” . 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


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election to parliament in 1977 as a ISRAEL: Calls to Evict Settlers 

boctalisL Miss Mercouri .was ap- 
pointed culture minister in 1981 by Continued from Rage 1 officials here have insisted on rede- 
the Socialist government. She re- ^ * hdiewr in the fining the basis of the peace talks so 

<u^u,,hcpos. to Oct ober. . S&JS 1“ ■*» of £5 * 

“Never on Sunday, centering ^ ^ ^ ^ m _ 

> wore eluding the ancient town of He- 


Continental Adds Flights, Cuts Fares 1 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Continental Airlines is increasing the frequen- 
cy of nonstop service and reducing fares between dozens of cities in' the 
Eastern United States, joining other carriers that arc permanently lower- 
ing lares on shorter routes in response to growing competitive pressures. 

Continental said, for example, that beginning Wednesday it would 
increase the number of daily nonstop flights from Greensboro, North 
utrolma, to other East Coast cities to 57 from 3. Unrestricted one-way 
fares from Greensboro that used to range from S22G to $341 have be® 
cut to $69 to $139. 


ii<“ i* 


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Victim 


ol 


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if on i 


on a prostitute who refused to wori 
more than six nights a week, made 
Miss Mercouri an international 
star. The movie was directed by 
Jules Dassin. her dose companion 
and later her husband. Mr. D assin. 
the sera of a New York barber, fled 
to Europe after being blacklisted in 
Hollywood in the 1950s. 

Mr. Dassin directed, and often 


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bron, where Abraham is believed to 
be buried and which is venerated 
by both Jews and Muslims. 

In 1970. stQl under Labor, Rabbi 
Levinger and his foUowera were 
moved to the newly created settle- 
ment of Kiryat Arba, the town of 
5,000 just outside Hebron where 
Baruch Goldstein, the man respon- 
sible for the Hebron massacre, had 
lived. But in the night in March 
1979, dozens of Kiiyai Arba resi- 
dents went back into the heart of 
Hebron, and they have been there 
ever since. 

They have prevailed through a 
mixture of active arconragement 
from governments ted by the Likud 


merits are put on the bargaining 
table immediately. 

“Settlements are time bombs," 
Faisal Husseinl the Palestinian 
trader in East Jerusalem, said Sat- 
urday. 


Officials with Delta Air Lines and United Airlines also said they 
planned new low-fare service in the East and possibly elsewhere 'in 
commg months. USAir has already instituted low® fares on shorter 
routes. Camera are unabashedly modeling themselves after Southwest 

AlninM ffllA nnfi/vn^fl — - * --* - 1 . .. P. i v . . _ 




It? 


Airlines, the nation’s only consistently profitable major carrier, which 
and frequent service, drawing people who otherw._ 


UN Gets Food to Kabul 
As Blockade Is Lifted 


jrarty and more passive acceptance 


. Labor-led governments like Mr. 
Rabin’s. 


In the last few days, Pales tinian 


The Associated Press 

KABUL (AP) — The first Unit- 
ed Nations food delivery in more 
than two months reached this bat- 
tered capital Sunday when Afghan- 
istan’s renegade prime minis ter 
temporarily lifted a blockade of the 
city. 

The arrival of a six-truck convoy 
marked the end of a five-day stand- 
off between the UN and Prime 
Minister Gulbuddin Hekmatyar. 


offers low fares 
might not fly. 

The first of 20 dty bases powered by natural gas made their debut bn 
the streets of Brussels during the weekend as pan of the city's attempt to 
cut pollution and noise. Leo Cameriynk, a spokesman for the Brussels 
transit authority, said the buses emitted carbon dioxide, but not sulphur 
or lead. fa 

This Week’s Holidays 

Banking and government offices will be closed or sendees curtafled'in 
the following countries and their dependencies this week because of 
national and religious holidays: 


TUESDAY: Azerbaijan, Belarus, Burkina Faso, Georgia, Gumea- Bissau, Kyr- V 
gratae Moldova. Mongolia. Russia. Syria. Tqikism T^kmeniatm^^iiX < J 


WEDNESDAY: Liberia. 
THURSDAY: Nepal, Sri imIih 
SATURDAY: Lesotho, Zambia. 



Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuter, s. 


O 

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B^ptibllc^^laht TakesOn Moderates 


WASHINGTON — — In a signal that th«» #» 

' the Republican Party will dor ™ nt right of 

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Oepiiardt Open to Changes In Health BIH 

W £SF?J?I 0N “ 75 e House majority leader. Richard A. 


Ge phar dt, Democrat of Missouri, is p: 
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_ .. _ , _ r .__ared to make major alter- 

aams in President Bill Clinton’s health bill to move it through 
Congress, including stretching out the introduction of universal 
cowsrage and considering alternative ways to pay for it. 

Whether one or another provision is “not dead, or dead," is not the 
question, he said. “To me the question is, can we pass the goals, the 
goals the president has set out" Mr. Clinton has said the one thing 
he insists on is that everybody in America should have insurance. 

Mr. Gephardt said that “I'm confident we can and will do that," 
but that not “exactly in aD the ways" the president has proposed. 
“We have the ability to be flexible, " he said. “We can deal with 
different variants'* of Mr. Clinton's plan and different timing for 
certain things to happen. 

It was the strongest signal so far from the House leadership that 
Democrats are wining to compromise on the most disputed elements 
of the president’s plan. For example, he said, the health alliances — 
the insurance purchasing cooperatives proposed by Mr. Clinton to 
spread the risks of sickness over a huge pool of people and to 
' encourage competition among doctors and hospitals — “don’t have 
to be exactly as the president proposed them." (WP) 

Mitchell Doesn’t Buie Out Job in Baseball 

WASHINGTON — The Senate majority leader, George J. Mitch- 
ell, Democrat of Maine, says he is open to the possibility of 
becoming commissioner of major league baseball or a member of the 
' Suprane Court, bat has denied that he is leaving the Senate in hopes 
of a specific job. 

The Democratic leader, 60, who stunned his colleagues on Friday 
by announcing he would not seek re-election this fall, repeated that 
he was motivated by a desire to seek “new challenges." (WP) 

Quote/ Unquote 

Senator Mitchell: “It’s very unfortunate that the American people 
have become so persuaded that all elected officials are interested in 
■ power and perks and are devoid of idealism and high motives, that 
people are conditioned to be suspicious of all public statements. 
There is not and need not always be an ulterior motive.” (NYT) 


Stasi Revelations Prompted CIA- FBI Search for Mole 


By Walter Pincus, R. Jeffrey Smith 
and Pierre Thomas 

WaMngtm Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Revelations contained in for- 
mer East German intelligence files prompted the cre- 
ation of a joint CIA-FBI investigative effort three 
years ago that went on to uncover alleged spying by 
the CIA official Aldrich Hazen Ames, according to 
sources familiar with the probe. 

Some counterintelligence officials suspected as ear- 
ly as 1 985 that 


QA perhaps had helped the Stasi puli off the decep- 
tion. 

Investigators drew up a list of roughly 200 people 
who not only had known the identities of the Stasi 
agents but also had knovn of earlier failed operations 
against the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Ames fell under suspicion, along with others, 
because he bad dealt with some of the East German 
agents and had known of the operations against the 
Soviets, having directed counterintelligence efforts in 
two branches of the Operations Directorate. By May 
1993. Mr. Ames had become the focus of a cnminal 
but separate CIA and FBI probes languished' for investigation by the FBI; he was arrested on Feb. 21 
years, riven by bureaucratic haggling and rivalries that because of concerns he might flee. 


did not abate until 1991 when the joint effort was 
stitched together, the sources said 
The East German files revealed that all the spies 
that the United States was thought to have recruited in 
the Stasi intelligence service were in fact donble 
agents, the officials said Shaken by this discovery, the 
CIA finally agreed to join with the FBI in an a{ 
si ve internal probe, suspecting that someone inside 1 


ability 

helped not only by the earlier lack of CIA-FBI coordi- 
nation but also by lax internal security procedures and 
a series of lapses by government investigators, accord- 
ing to CIA, FBI and congressional officials briefed on 
the investigation. 

These lapses included a failure until recently to 
monitor Mr. Ames’s overseas travel, probe his sudden 


wealth, guard against the theft from CIA headquarters 
of highly classified documents and detect unautho- 
rized contacts between Mr. Ames and Russian offi- 
cials in Washington or overseas. 

The FBI is technically the lead federal agency in 
domestic counterintelligence efforts, and the CIA is 
responsible for monitoring its own employees. But 
before 1991, FBI and congressional officials said, 
senior CIA managers generally played down the possi- 
bility that one of their key employees could be a 
turncoat and blocked independent scrutiny by the FBI 
of some failed spy operations. 

Senator Dennis DeCondni, Democrat of Arizona, 
chairman of the Select Committee on Intelligence, said 
that he expected the CIA inspector general, Frederick 
P. Hitz, to open an independent probe of allegations 
that the CIA hindered inquiries. But congressional 
sources said CIA officials were seeking limits on the 
scope of Mr. Hitz's work that might undermine its 
viability. 

Investigators now say they believe that Mr. Ames 
was spying for Moscow by 1985. That year and the 


next, seven agents who had been recruited by the CIA 
inside the KGB were arrested by the Soviets or just 
disappeared, according to former CIA officials. 

One of those arrested was Major General Dimitri 
Polyakov, an official of the Soviet GRU nriliiaiy 
intelligence agency who had passed secrets to his FBI 
handlers for 20 years. He whs tried and shot in 1988. 
but his fate was not announced by Moscow until 1 990. 
Another U.S. spy arrested in 1985 was Adolf ToUca- 
chev, a military researcher in Russia who was executed 
in 1986. 

The FBFs fist of potential victims of Mr. Ames's 
spying also includes Valeri Martynov and Sergei Mo- 
torin, two U.S. spies recruited by the FBI from the 
KGB station at the Soviet Embassy in Washington. 
Both were arrested after returning to Moscow. 

Mr. Motorin was caught one day after meeting with 
his U.S. handlers in 1986, according to U.S. and other 
sources. The location of the meeting was leaked from 
the CIA by someone who was sitting cm his file, 
according to Yuri Shvets, a former KGB agent now 
living in the United States. 


Farrakhan’s Recipe 
For Black Self-Help 

Program Teaches f Manhood 9 


Opposing 


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Away From Politics 


•A $13 bdlion nifitaiy communications sateffite built primarily for 
nuclear war and launched last month has experienced, a power 
failure in orbit, the Pentagon said. Senior Pentagon officials de- 
scribed the problem as minor, but critics said it was significant ■ 

• A man wbo shot and kffled an abartioa-diiiic doctor in Pensacola, 
Florida, last March has been convicted in Pensacola of first-degree 
murder. Michael F. Griffin, 32, a fonner chemical plant worker, was 
sentenced to life imprisonment with eligibility for parole after 25 
years. 

• The crew of the space shuttle Cohnnbia collected saliva and urine 
samples for research on diet and space travel, while ground engi ne e r s 
kept an rye on a problem with the craft’s hydraulic system. The 
problem, which arose shortly after lift-off Friday, could cause the 
sched uled 14-day mission to be cut short, National Aeronautics and 
Space Ad ministra tion officials said. 

• In response to the conviction of four Mosfim mfltant s in the 
bombing of the World Trade Center in New Yak. some of their 
sympathizers in Egypt have warned that the verdicts will spur 
revenge attacks against Americans in the West and across the Middle 

■ East. A Muslim militant leader said the Isl amic Group, an Egyptican 
organization that has taken responsibility for numerous attacks on 
Westerners in the past, will cany out attacks against “American 
diplomats and other officials." 

^ NYT. At 




Student Victim of Shooting 
On Brooklyn Bridge Dies 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — One of the four 


A spokeswoman at Sl Vincent’s 
Hospital confirmed Mr. Halber- 
stam’s death. 

“We are one large family and we ^ 

all fed the deepest grief, pain and ^ program enabled 

.. anguish," the Jewish group said m mosque 10 reach people who wen 

- _ : ' . v Aaron Halberstam, 16, died Sat- its statement. “Our hearts go out to no j already believers and “to help 
■ at Sl Vincent’s Hospital, the immediate family for the loss of 

-v- said an aide to Rabbi Yehuda their young son.” 


-Jewish students shot on the Brook- 
J'iyn Bridge has died of his wounds, 
k a spokesman for the Lubavitcher 
; Hasidic movement said Sunday. 


By Michel Marriott 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — More than two 
dozen black men, many dressed in 
work boots and baggy slacks and a 
few in b usiness suits with briefcases 
at their sides, recently climbed the 
steep concrete stairs to Muham- 
mad’s Mosque No. 7 in Harlem in 
search of two things the Nation of 
Islam promised they could find in- 
side: brotherhood and proper di- 
rection. 

The men dutifully trudged 
through a fresh coat of snow to the 
unadorned blond-brick building 
that houses the mosque as well as a 
supermarket, a combination barber 

Last of a series. 

shop and beauty salon, a boxing 
gym and a theater company. 

There is no gilded Islamic ico- 
nography here; only a modest 
hand-lettered sign outside a third- 
floor window indicates that this is a 
place of Islamic work and worship, 
(he latest incarnation of a flagship 
Nation of Mam mosque that was 
largely built by Malcolm X and has 
been led fa more than a decade by 
Louis Farrakhan. 

Yet while much of Harlem 
stirred to a sluggish start on this 
Saturday, the men, many of them 
, non-Muslims, had little difficulty 
finding their way to the building 
and to their seats fa what mosque 
officials are describing as “man- 
hood training.” 

The Nation of Islam has built hs 
mostly urban black membership in 
large part by retrofitting genera- 
tions of men with values of old- 
fashioned manners and behavior. 
Mixed in with heavy doses of reli- 
gious mysticism, separatist ideolo- 
gy and angry, hate-charged rhetoric 
aimed at anyone — white, Jewish 
or black — thought to impede 
black progress, are equally heavy 
doses of self-respect, self-love and 
self-reliance. 

Manhood training, a pilot pro- 
gram aimed at nonmemoers, was 
started a month ago to answer of- 
ten-heard criticisms that Mr. Far- 
rakhan’s brand of Islam is little 
mare than a movement of oratory, 
not deeds. 

“In order to be a well-rounded 
man, you have to know things, like 
how to manage a household econo- 
my, how to write a check and bal- 
ance a checkbook,” said Conrad 
Muhammad, leader of the Harlem 
mosque. “And these are things (hat 
many of our men come to this 
training without." 

Mr. Muhammad said that atypi- 
cal session attracted 200 meat mid 
the 


part 


whenever Mr. Farrakhan’s name 
arises. One longtime neighborhood 
resident, Albert Murray, a writer, 
said the popularity of the Nation of 
Islam was a troubling indication of 
the extent of confusion racking 
much of black America. 

“It's a bunch of ignorance," he 
said. “What concerns me most is 
that this promotion a stimulation 
of a feeling of alienation, separat- 
ism and hostility, would put down 
legitimate ambitions of American 
citizens that the civil rights move- 
ment made realizable 

But it is just as easy to find 
supporters, people (ike Tekima 
Berlack, a Harlem hat store owner, 
a non-Muslim wbo stool outside 
the 369th Armory in Harlem where 
Mr. Farrakhan spoke recently 
shouting encouragement to the 
blocks-long columns of men inch- 
ing past on the way to hear him. 

On this recent snowy Saturday, 
the glass door at the foot of the 
mosque's stairs was flung open to 
blade men, any black men, who 
cared to participate in manhood 
training. It is part lecture, pan 
paramilitary drilling and 
group therapy. 

It also is a seamless dissemina- 
tion of the basic tenets of Nation of 
Islam philosophy, including hand- 
outs detailing the 26 “restricted 
laws of Islam," which was under- 
scored by a lecture on the perils of 
pork, gamb ling, lying and adultery. 

A tall, honey-voiced man later 
introduced as Brother Kenneth 6X 
glanced at his watch and decided 
that the first lesson erf the day 
would be about punctuality. 

“Be on time, brothers” he said, 
admonishing nearly half the men 
who took their seats 15 minutes 
after the scheduled 10 A.M. start 
“Don’t think that because the 
weather is bad that we are not go- 
ing to start on time. We are going to 
begin on time." 

Many of the men attending the 
training classes say they carefully 
pick and choose from the group’s 
smorgasbord erf race remedies and 
try not to get swept up in the sheer 
power of Muslim persuasion. 

“Fm not interested in being a 
Muslim,” said a 33-year-old pub- 
executive who has attended 
manhood training sessions 
at the Harlem mosque. “I'm a 
thanking individual who takes and 
uses anything I want from anyone 
who offers a good idea." 

“I like their comnuiment to em- 
powerment and to doing fa self” 
he added. “1 want to stand with 
them fa that. I don’t hate anyone.” 



Bernard W. 


as White House counsel 


f My Sole Objective Was to Serve You’ 


Reuters 

Following is ait excerpt from the letter of resigna- 
tion of Bernard W. Nussbaum, the White House 
counsel: 

As I know you know, from the day I became 
counsel, my sole objective was 10 serve you as well 
and as effectively as I could, consistent with the 
rules of law, standards of ethics, and the highest 


traditions of the bar. At ail times I have conducted 
the office of the White House counsel and per- 
formed the duties of counsel to the president in an 
absolutely legal and ethical mann er. Unfortunate- 
ly, as a result of controversy generated by those 
who do not understand, nor wish to understand the 
role and obligations of a lawyer, even one acting as 
White House counsel I now believe I can best 
serve yon by returning to private life. 


HILLARY: President’s Wife in Whitewater Vortex 


Continued from Page 1 
ment contracts in savings and loan 
cases. 

And, making matters stickier, 
the firm has begun its own inquiry 
into whether Mr. Hnbbdl over- 
billed clients and misused money. 

On top of all that, the health care 
plan that Mrs. Clinton developed is 
losing public support because 
many Americans see it as too com- 
plicated and intrusive. And her 
younger brother, Hugh Rodham, is 
trading on her name m a stumbling 
bid fa the U.S. Senate in Florida. 

Mrs. Clinton’s mood is not likely 
to be lightened by the agonizing 
over the departure of Mr. Nuss- 
baum. The counsel’s friends said 
Mrs. Clinton had talked to him 
with concern in (he last few days 
about face-saving ways he could 
leave the White House. 

At times in the last 14 months, 
Mrs. Clinton has dazzled Washing- 
ton as she tried modernize ha role 
as the president’s wife. She has 


CLINTON: Gore Admits Fumbles 


sd O' Oj:-'- -- 


said an aide to Rabbi 
„ Krinsky, a spokesman fa the sect. 

“Ari is a martyr who died bo- 
-v cause he was a Jew," the group said 
-Jin a statement. 

The aide said that Mr. Halber- 
stam's family was with him when 
he died and that his funeral would 
-be held Sunday in Brooklyn, the 
J.New York borough where he had 
lived and studied. . 

. He had been declared bram dead 
.-fry doctors on Wednesday, a day 
after a van carrying 15 Jewish stu- 
dents was attacked on the Brooklyn 
Bridge. 


Another student, Nachum Sos- 
sonkm, 18, was critically wounded 
in the shooting. Two others sur- 
vived with lesser wounds. 

Rasbad Baz, 28, a Lebanese 
ymm, was charged in the shooting. 

Two Jordanians — Bassam 
Reyati, 27, the owner of a Brooklyn 
taxi service where Mr. Baz worked, 
and Hlai Mohammad, 32, who runs 
a repair shop where Mr. Baz appar- 
ently drove his car after the shoot- 
ing — were also arrested. They 
were weapons posses- 

si on and hindering prosecution. 


our people in these communities to 
organize themselves." 

The training program is one rea- 
son that the Harlem mosque — the 
nerve center of Nation of Islam 
activities in New York — is becom- 
ing a landmark of hope and defi- 
ance. Many blacks throughout the 
New Yak metropolitan region say 
they see it as a factory in which men 
and women, whether troubled by 
dings a criminality a simply un- 
certainty, can be retooled into com- 
munity assets. 

Certainly, (here are many black 
voices in Harlem and elsewhere 
that speak of worry and concern 


Contmaed from Page 1 

were pushing the issue to barm Mr. 
Clinton’s standing. “There is an 
enormous amount of partisanship" 
in the issue, Mr. Gore said. 

And Mr. Stephanopolous, ap- 
pearing on the ABC News program 
“This Week with David Brinkley 
said: “The Republicans can’t run 
on the economy. They can’t run on 
health care. They can’t run on wel- 
fare and they can’t run on crime, so 
they're going to try to exploit this 
issue.” 


He said that “when you Stan 
getting in a position where it looks 
Hke you're covering things up, 
when you start interfering with in- 
vestigations, that can quickly be- 
come obstruction of justice." 

Mr. Gramm called on Mr. Clin- 
ton to “make all this information 
public, answer all the questions and 
whatever dirty linen’s there, it will 
look better now than it’s going to 
look a month from now." 

Senator Alfonse D’Amaio, Re- 
publican of New Yak, issued 
statements over the weekend say- 



‘getemg worse. 


STAFF: As Disarray Mounts , White House Sinks Further Into Whitewater 


1 

again to right itself. David R. Ger- 
: gen, the senior White House advis- 
■ ex, said Mr. Omton, who left unex- 
• pectedly Saturday for Camp 
’ David, is now committed to bang 
: “very aggressive in ensuring that 
J drisWmte House is open,coop«a- 
\ the and forthcoming" in dealing 

i with the issues. 

But at the same tune, aides ac- 



S KSKtsetinatweek’sendat 

•:'! a White House v/bere bad news 

; never seems to stop. “We wjj 8? 

past this,” said one, offering jus 
' reassurances that “the 
; notiting wrong, not in Whitewater 

• and not since, and that will °^ . 
i But, he said, “getting 

■. this after last week means another 

.■ struggle, another phase d 

• bon, another level of compheah^ 
-with everyone getting 

lawyers, g oing to grand Junes* in- 
sure what they can talk about an 


to whom, and all this while we enter 
a critical legislative stage.” 

The transformation of 
Whitewater from a complex real- 
estate- transaction in which the 
Clintons may or may not have lost 
money into a staple of the nightly 
news is the fruit in large part of a 
White House operation whose ev- 
ery move made it appear that there 
was something to hide. 

When questions about 
Whitewater first arose dining the 
1992 campaign, the Clintons re- 
sponded with a report suggesting 
thauhey had ktt $69,000 m the 

real-estate deal and declined to 


named in that referral as potential 
beneficiaries of Madison Guaranty 
Savings & Loan improprieties, al- 
though not accused of any wrong- 
doing. But the White House strate- 
gy of refusing to provide 
information fa the ensuing stories 
only piqued reporters' interest. 

The first major flare-up came 
with the belated disclosure, four 
months after the fact, that 
Whitewater documents had been 
among those in the office of the 
deputy White House counsel Vin- 
cent w. Fester Jr n when he com- 
mitted suicide last July, Had that 
rem-w,— r been revealed at the time, it might 

provide modi information beyond ^ about 

whether it was appropriate fa Mm 
to be handling personal legal wok 
fa the Clintons. 


his office, but not the Gin ton per- 
sonal documents — ended up hurt- 
ing the White House much mac. 

Outsiders who are familiar with 
the White House operation suggest 
its problems go beyond Mr. Nuss- 
baum. 

At the White House, there is a 
sense of disbelief that it has crane 
to this. 

“It is crazy, it is insane, it is nuts 
that this thing should loom large 
not because of what it was back m 
Arkansas a decade ago but because 
of whaiwehffein the White House 
are doing,” an official said. 


duct of Ms aides. Mr. D’Amato and 
42 other Republican senators have 
called for congressional hearings. 

The House Ways and Means 
Committee chairman, Dan Rosten- 
kowski. Democrat of Illinois, 
whose committee oversees the 
Treasury Department, was asked 
on the ABC News program if he 
would hold hearing s on Treasury 
officials’ roles in the meetings. 

He replied that if Treasury Sec- 
retary Lloyd Bentsen called him, or 
if “I call him," there would be a 
discussion and “well take a look at 
it." 

—ANN DEVROY 


worked hard to please everyone 
and satisfy herself, treating an 
awkward hybrid of comforting old 
first lady rituals and unsettling new 
co-preadcntial power structures. 

But Clinton strategists have al- 
ways felt there was a risk inherent 
in the ambiguity of Mrs. Clinton’s 
position: She is exercising power 
without an official tide. She is the 
first presidential spouse with her 
own power base in the White 
House and her own set of top offi- 
cial 5 throughout the government 
who owe their jobs, and loyalty, to 
her as much as to her husband. 

Even those close to the Oimons 
complain that this has created con- 
fusion, especially in a White House 
that struggles daily with tangled 
lines of authority 

“It’s hard 10 run a White House 
with nobody in charge." said an 
influential Democratic friend of 
the Clintons. “It’s especially hard 
to run a White House with nobody 
in charge and two presidents." 

Everyone in the administration 
knows that power is centralized at 
the White House in the hands of 
BUI and HDlaiy Clinton. 

David Gergen, hired as the 
WMte House troubleshooter, seems 
too worried lately about his own 
future to help in this tune of trou- 
ble. And the weak chief of staff, 
Thomas F. (Mack) McLarty 3d, 
has announced each time the WMte 
House has conceded guilt in misus- 
ing federal agencies that he knew 
nothing about it 

As Senator Bob Dole of Kansas 
mocked last week: “Mack 
McLarty, the chief of staff, has is- 
sued a memo: ‘You cannot do this 
anymore because (hey have caught 
us.’ ” 

Marlin Fitzwaier, the press 
spokesman for Presidents George 
Bush and Ronald Reagan, said the 
blind spots that always exist with 
regard to a first lady are made 


worse when the spouse has such 
rarepower. 

“The senia staff always fears 
crossing a first lady,” he said. 

‘Tartly, it’s the respect fa the of- 
fice of first lady. Partly, it’s a man- 
woman thing : You’re afraid that 
when she’s home with the presi- 
dent, she’ll repeat the charges 
against you every night fa the rest 
of your life." 

Many high-ranking Omton offi- 
cials confess that on matters from 
the first family to health care to 
WMtewater, they are afraid to chal- 
lenge Mrs. Clinton, a even to ““ 
her honest advice about things 
fear are being handled wrong. 

“No one wants to tell Bill a 
especially Hillary, that they can’t 
do t hin g s the way they’re used to 
done them,” a top administration 
official said. “Andso many of these 
people around them are old 
friends, thai you can’t just break 

into the circle.” 

Even Mr. Fitzwaier, far from the ■ ed by the owner of the savings and 
reach of the While House, pleaded loan. 

humorously: “Don’t say I said any- No wrongdoing has been alleged 
thing bad about Hillary. Tm as in connection with Mr. Clinton’s 
scared of her as everyone else.” investment. 


FBI Issues 

Whitewater 

Subpoenas 

By Douglas Jehl 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The FBI 
has served a string of subpoenas on 
10 senior While House and Trea- 
sury Department officials fa testi- 
mony and documents related to 
their discussions about an inquiry 
into a failed Arkansas savings and 
loan. 

The subpoenas issued to some of 
the most senia aides to President 
Bin Clin ion and Treasury Secretary 
Lloyd Bentsen was a major new 
embarrassment. 

The six WMte House aides sub- 
poenaed to testify are Bernard W. 
Nussbaum. wbo resigned as White 
House counsel on Saturday; Bruce 
Lindsey, a senior adviser to Mr. 
Clinton; Harold M. I ekes, the dep- 
uty chief of staff; Mark D. Gearan, 
the communications director; 
Maggie Williams, the chief of staff 
to Hillary Rodham Clinton, and 
lisa Caputo, Mrs. din ton's press 
secretary. 

All were ordered to testify before 
a federal grand jury in Washington 
on Thursday. 

A separate subpoena demanded 
that the WMte House surrender all 
documents and communications 
relating to contacts between the 
White House and Treasury Depart- 
ment officials about the savings 
and loan, Madison Guaranty. 

In response, the deputy White 
House counsel, Joel 1. Klein, issued 
a memorandum ordering the White 
House staff not to destroy docu- 
ments and information stored on 
their computers. 

The Treasury Department 
spokesman, Howard Schloss, said 
that Deputy Secretary Roger C 
Altman, a department counsel 
Jean Hanson, and Josh Steiner, Mr. 
Bentsen’s chief of staff, had been 
subpoenaed by the grand jury sit- 
ting in little Rock, Arkansas, un- 
der the direction of the special 
prosecutor investigating the bank 
failure and the Clintons’ invest- 
ment in a real estate venture. 

Mr. Nussbanm’s departure was 
due in part to the embarrassment 
he caused the president by partici- 
pating in a series of meetings with 
senia Treasury Department offi- 
cials to discuss the status of the 
federal investigation into Madison 
Guaranty. 

Madison Guaranty is being scru- 
tinized by Robert B. Hske Jr., the 
special counsel who has been ap- 
pointed to look into the role it 
played in Mr. Clinton’s investment 
m a real estate development, called 
WMtewater, that had been mount- 


it's way fo fubfcr&o 
in Great Britain 

just calk O BOO 89 5965 


once 


that. 

The questions resumed 
Clinton took office, after the Reso- 
lution Trust Corp. asked the Justice 
Department to investigate a sav- 
jnwand loan owned by James 
^rtougal, the Clintons’ partner m 
Whitewater. The Clintons wens 


But the apparent effot at decep- 
tion — repaters were told about 
the disposition of official files and 
Mr. Foster’s personal papers from 


just 


ask the butter... ^ 


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ee to Air Corridors for Tuzla 


BOOKS 


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t^pHaibrOvr SiaJJ Frm Dupaifa 

SARAJEVO. Bosnia- Herzegovi- 
jy -^The leader of the Bosnian 
<abs. Radovan Karadzic, agreed 
Monday to open two air corridors to 
die besieged Muslim enclave of 
■fuzla in northern Bosnia but re- 
ports, of fighting elsewhere cast a 
sto§W over fragile truce accords. 

-We liave agreed on the use of 
[wo air corridors to Tuzla. one 
leading from Zagreb, the other 
from Split" said Yasushi Akashi. 
die special United Nations envoy 
to the former Yugoslavia. He was 
spcafaii^after talks with Mr. Kar- 
adzic ana the .commander of UN 
forces in Bosnia, Sir Michael Rose, 
at (he Bosnian Serbian headquar- 
ters in the town of Pale. 

The "report of the Tuzla accord 
came as a.NATO jet swooped over 
Magiaj on Sunday after Bosnian 
ladlo claimed Bosnian Serbian jets 
destroyed a bridge in an attack sim- 
ilar to one last week that provoked 
NATO retaliation. But with Magiaj 
our of reach of independent inspec- 
tion. neither the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization nor the UN 
could confirm the reported bom- 
bardment, and Bosnian Serbs ridi- 
culed it, accusing the Bosnian 
Army of mimicking an air strike. 

“There have been no bombard- 
ments of Magiaj," a statement by 


military in 


.Banian Serbian 
Banja Luka said. 

Magiaj is cut off by besieging 
oerns. who have refused UN re- 
quests for access to the Muslim- 
donunated pockei 70 kilometers 
tw miles) north of Sarajevo. 

NATO is enforcing die UN- 
mandated no-flight zone over Bos- 
nia: a bombing raid, would be a 
flagrant violation of the zone. 

Bosnian radio and Croatian ide- 
vision said the planes targeted 


town, the Bosnian government's 
most important stronghold after 
Sarajevo, has since been supplied 
only by land. 

Airlifts from the Croatian capital 
of Zagreb and the port of Split 
would serve not only Tuzla but also 
many of the 12 million people in 
central Bosnia displaced by 23 
months of war. 

The Russian news agency Itar- 
Tass said an advance group or Rus- 
sian experts had arrived in Tuzla to 


Maglaj's only bridge, which Sans ■ for the deployment of Rus- 
the Basna river, destroying the aan observere 31 ^ a^P 0 *- Th* 

air bridge might open as early as 
March 18. it said. 

Reports of fighting elsewhere 
cast doubts over cease-fire arrange- 
ments between Muslims and Serbs 
in Sarajevo and between Muslims 
and Croats across Bosnia. 

There were conflicting reports 
on the situation at Magiaj, besieged 
For months by both Serbian and 
Croatian forces. The Croatian news 
agency HINA, quoting ham radio 
operators in Magiaj, said Serbian 
combat aircraft knocked out the 
bridge between the old and new 


structure. 

Any bombing would be ano ther 
challenge to NATO's newly dem- 
onstrated resolve to punish warring 
parties in the former Yugoslavia. 
Two U.S.-piloted F-16 fighters 
downed four Serbian Galeb p lanes 
m central Bosnia last Monday. UN 
officials said the Serbian plants 
were attacking .Bosnian govern- 
ment targets. 

Agreement to open Tuzla airport 
stemmed from talks in Moscow last 
Tuesday between Mr. Karadzic 
and the Russian foreign minister, 
Andrei V. Kozyrev, who promised 
to send observers to ensure that 
relief flights did not carry military 
supplies. 

The airport has been closed since 
May 1 992. when Serbian, artillery 
damaged its two runways. The 


There was no independent confir- 
mation of either report. 

But UN sources and local police 
confirmed the first major cease-fire 
violation since December in Cro- 
atia, saying Serbian artillery 
opened up on the Croatian town of 
Gospic. Police said a woman was 
killed and two persons were 
wounded. 

Serbs controlling about a third of 
Croatia signed a UN-brokered 
truce with the Croatian govern- 
ment in Da-ember and there had 
been little military action since. 

A UN officer in Zagreb said 
Czech peacekeeping troops in the 


THE PALACE THIEF 

By Ethan Canin. 205 pages. S2L 
Random House. 

Reviewed by 
Peter D. Kramer 

C HEKHOV. Bulgakov. 

Maugham. Celine. William 
Carlos Williams. Walker Percy. For 
the physician-author the question is 
always whether he will be one more 
“doctor who writes’' or whether he 
will join the select group of writers 
who are also doctors. 

Ethan Canin. then a medical Stu- 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Philip Joseph, chairman of 
Books etc.. London booksellers, is 
reading "Body and Soul” by Frank 
Conroy. 

"It is an unputdownable. good 
old-fashioned novel about a young 
American boy born wuh every dis- 
advantage. except an ability to play 
the piano. It is so inspiring and the 
beauty of the telling stays with 
one.” 

(Michael Kallenback JHT) 



Gospic area recorded 167 artillery dent, now a resident, made an ac- 
rounds fired from both sides, with claimed debut in 1988 with the story 
one round landing near a UN ob- 
servation post. 

On another front line in former 
Yugoslavia, the town of Mostar in 
southwestern Bosnia, Bosnian Cro- 
atian forces began withdrawing 
heavy weapons, a day ahead of a 
deadline. Bosnian Croats and Mus- 
lims agreed in Washington last 
week to end almost a year of fight- 


coUeelion “Emperor of the Air." 
The tone was set by the first line: 
“Let me tell you who 1 am.” All but 
one of the stories were told in the 
first person; all featured a distinc- 
tive, believable voice; all turned on 
.an uncharacteristic transgression 
that revealed the narrator to himself. 


pans of the town and subsequently 
flew air raids on other targets. 

Muslim-controlled Sarajevo said 
three persons were kiHed and six 
wounded in Serbian attacks. 
“Howitzers, mortars and tanks are 
pounding the town," the radio said. 


Canin’s 1991 novel, “Blue Riv- 

. , - - . , r. er ,” an expansion of one of those 

stories - the ways that ad- 

whjcb would eventually be linked QumfoQ and jealousy of a brilliant, 

.„„j deviant older brother affect a bov's 
Military commanders agrred development Constancy of cbarac- 

ter is the issue. The boy betrays 
which both sides would Withdraw f ^ ^ rriend & 

thar heavy weapons or place them rebdlious brother; ^ M ^ulu he 
by D°° n °J£ drives the brother away once more. 


GMT) on Monday. ( Reuters, API 


ncm 



RISE: The Stunning Ascension of Zhirinovsky, a Political Nobody in 5 90 


In “The Palace Thief,” his new 
collection of four long stories. 


Canin pursues similar themes — 
rivalry, second chances, the nature 
of character. But the perspectives 
here are more extreme, the use of 
language more daring. 

The strongest piece, “Batorsag 
and Szerelem.” is a reworking of the 
“Blue River” constellation. Wiffiam 
watches as his genius older brother, 
Clive, becomes odder and more dar- 
ing. In a strange decade, Clive out- 
does the oddity around him by start- 
ing to speak in a seemingly made-up 
language. The world seems to move 
too fast, but, beneath the pace and 
turmoil of observations that recall 
the style of Don DeliDo, human 
character retains its constancy. 

“Character is fate.” the father 
quotes Heraclitus. William asks, 
“What if 1 changed my character?” 


!' .'■* 








W -***■ ‘ 




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vi-i a 


Get 




Continued from Page 1 

those who worked closely with him 

p years. Near the end of the inter- 
view, in a fury at repeated ques- 
tions about his past, he threatened 
to prosecute and imprison journal- 
ists who “interfere with my private 
life” and “inflict moral rfamagp on 
me.” 

In his campaign autobiography, 
“The Final Thrust South.” • Mr. 
Zhirinovsky writes about his un- 
happy childhood in Kazakhstan, 
his hapless early sexual experi- 
ences, his lonely years as an out-of- 
towner at an elite university in 
Moscow and his. two years 'after 
graduation as a Soviet Army officer 
in the Caucasus. He makes nearly 
no mention of the professional ca- 
reer that occupied his adult life 
before he became a politician. " 

After graduating from evening 
law school at Moscow State Uni- 
versity. Mr. Zhirinovsky, then 29, 
went to work in 1975 for Inyurkd- 
Iegiya, a stale-run law firm. 6ne of 
about 50 lawyers in the firm, he was. 
assigned to track down Soviet citi- 
zens whose relatives in the West 
had left them pension, alimony and 
inheritance benefits. 

At first, all went smoothly. He 
was regarded as professionally 
competent, energetic and well orga- 
' -xized. He became head" of the . 
win’s trade unioti. But as' fime 
wore on, Mr. Zhirinovsky , seemed 
tc grow restless and began voicing 
his political opinions around the 
office in tones that his supervisor 
remembers as strident . 

“He would come into my office 
repeatedly to talk about politics," 
said Yevgeni Koulicbev, Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky’s immediate boss at Inyur- 
koUegrya. “He was especially indig- 
nant that Russia was surrounded 
by Turks.” . 

The turning point came in the 
early 1980s, when Mr. Zhirinovsky 
asked his superiors to recommend 
him for membership in the Com- 
munist Party, Mr. Koutichev said. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky* now denies that 
he ever tried to become a Commu- 
nist. 

Explaining the reasons for Mr. 
Zhirinovskys failure to win the 
firm's hacking. Mr. Koulicbev said: 
“He was very emotional and gratu- 
itously, not constructively, critical. 
His ideas were disorganized, and he 
insisted fiercely on them. His char- 
acter, the remar ks he made, the way 
be related to people — these did 
not fit the code of Com m u n i s t be- 
havior ” 

His fate with InyurkoUegiya was 
sealed in the spring of 1983, when 
he was caught accepting what his 
superiors considered an improper 

gift. 

v * ^According to Mr. Koutichev, the 
'-matter involved an inheritance case 
from West Germany. Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky's Soviet client, whose relative 
had died in West Germany, had 
received as part of the inheritance 
spfri.il vouchers allowing him to 
stay at an exclusive resort. As a 
token of his appreciation, he gave 
the vouchers to Mr. Zhiripovsky. 

. According to Mr. Koulicbev, 
Mr. Zhirinovsky insisted he had 
returned the vouchers unused to 
the diem. But Mr. Koulicbev said 
Inyurkollegiya’s managers were 
convinced Sal he had returned the 
vouchers only after he had been 
found out „ 

This was the last straw, Mr- 
Konlichev said. It was decided, he 
said, that “unless he wanted more 
trouble, he'd better go." 

No charges were brought- Mr. 
Zhirinovsky, who denies that ne 
did anything improper. -left Inyur- 
kotiegiya in mid-1983. Sometime 


a party member at the time, refused 
on the grounds that the law did not 
permit dismissals for political rea- 
sons. 

While at Mir, Mr. Zhirinovsky 
seemed to act as a sort of workers’ 
advocate, in 1987, having gained 


Mr. Zhirinovsky was elected chair- 
man and-Mr. Bogachev his deputy. 

But the partnership was short- 
lived- Seven months later, while 
Mr. Zhirinovsky was in Helsinki 
attending a conference, the Liberal 
Democrats held their second party 


some attention with his lobbying ■ congress in Mr. Bogachev's Mos- 
for workers^ be derided to run as cow apartment. The party mem- 


Mir’s representative for the district 
council in Moscow's Dzerzhinsky 
district. But the local Communist 
Party officials, wary of his candida- 
cy, rewrote the rules so that he 
would be ineligible. " 

Meanwhile, a two-page letter 
marked “Extremely Confidential" 
arrived at the local party headquar- 
ters . According to Mr. Kartsev, 
who saw the letter, it was from 
InyurkoUegiya, describing the cir- 
cumstances in which Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky had left his old job. 

Undeterred by his exclusion 
from the neighborhood council 
election or the dredged-up story of 
his departure from hi&oM job,- Mr. 
Zhirinovsky looked for a new out- 
let for bis political ambitions. He 
found it in -1988, when Mir held 
elections for a 14-member employ- 
ees' council — a perestroika-era 
innovation designed as a counter- 
weight to management. 


bers, suspecting Mr. Zhirinovsky of 
ties to the Communist re gime, vot- 
ed to expel him. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky’s supposed 
links to the Communist Party in 
1990-91 have never been proved, 
and Mr. Zhirinovsky himself now 
denies that the party supported 
him But Russian journalists and 
some politicians speculate that, in 
early 1990, the party leadership 
and the KGB hit upon the idea of 
ming Mr. Zhirinovsky as a stalking 
horse, a sham “opposition” figure 
to give the appearance of political 
pluralism without threatening the 
Communists’ primacy. 

A few months later, in February 
1991, Mr. Zhirinovsky launched his 
own Liberal Democratic Party, this 
one confined to. the Russian Feder- 
ation. The party’s registration soon 
became the subject of controversy 
and suspected dark motives. Many 
saw the hand of the Communists 
and the KGB behind the party’s 


polled 6 million votes — nearly 8 
percent of the total — in Russia’s 
first popular presidential election. 
He finished third behind Boris N. 
Yeltsin and Nikolai 1. Ryzhkov, the 
Soviet prime minister. 

He expanded his entourage, 
forming what he called a “shadow 
cabinet” of framer security men 
and other hangers-on. To those 
who would listen, Mr. Zhirinovsky 
proclaimed that he would be Rus- 
sia's president. All the while, he 
prepared to run in whatever politi- 
cal race might come along next. 

He got his chance last fall when 
Mr. Yeltsin dissolved the Russian 
parliament and called new legisla- 
tive elections. Suddenly, Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky was on the move, thanks 


BRIDGE 


A quarter-century ago, 
Stakgokl of Newark, 


laijydy to television. 


the campaign provided a forum “F uauilu 
for extravagant 

promises of better ^benefits -^d.c 1991, Mr, Zhirinovsky 

conditions for workers at Mir. To 
this platfonn be added another 
populist idea: Mir should print 
omy popular, profitable /books 
rather than the purely scientific 
books that were it? specialty. The 
earnings should be distributed to 
workers rather than rolled bade 
into new prqjecis. be said. ., 

. It was the same sort of simply 
sounding, vote-grabbing idea that 
has marked much of Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky’s campaign rhetoric. The 
populist appeal 6f;these positions 
was echoed in his T991 and 1993 
national races, 'when he aiuacted 
attention and votes with his calls 
for higher pensions, cheap vodka, 
less crime and a. renewal of Great 
Mother Russia. . 

Mr. Kartsev opposed Mr. Zhir- 
inovsky’s candidacy, appealing di- 
rectly to the firm’s employees. 

' “I asked people not to vote for 
him, because he was unreasonable 
and unpredictable and would cre- 
ate more problems than he solved,” 

Mr. Kartsev said. 

He said Mr. Zhirinovsky had not 
frre n g frvaad. But -in his interview. 

Mr. Zhirinovsky called the cam- 
paign a “victory.” 

In 1990, Mr. Zhirinovsky en- 
tered another race, this time to be- 
come director of Mir. Mr. Kartsev 
was departing for a publishing iob 
with the Umted Nations in New 
York. All of the firm’s employees 
took part in the election, which Mr. 

Zhirinovsky lost badly. ■ . • 

Shortly after his defeat, Mr. 

Zhirinovsky left the publishing 
house to launch a full-time political 
career. 

Beginning in late 1987, be started 
attending the functions of a variety 
of groups that had nothing in com- 
mon beyond their .opposition to 
communism. He would, for 'in- 
stance, appear at gatherings spon- 
sored by Armenians and by Azeris, 
ethnic groups that regard each oth- 
er as enemies. : 

He also went to meetings of Sha- 
lom, a Jewish cultural organization 
founded in 1989. and became die 
head of several of Shalom's com- 
mittees. Simultaneously, he has 
said, he spoke at a rally staged by 
PamyaL a right-wing group, with 
strong anti-Samtic leanings’- 

In Moscow, Mr. Zhinnovskys 
participation in Sbalam is taken, as 
proof thai-he is at least party Jew- 


on-screen appearances were 
eyecatching, memorable for the 
simplicity of the message and the 
arresting impact of the messenger. 
Ordinary people, stunned by the 
chaos, hi gh prices and surging 
crime of the new Russia, watched 
Mr. Zhirinovsky's advertisements, 
impressed and amazed. 

On Dec. 12, the Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party of Russia placed first 
with nearly 23 percent of the total 
— about 12.3 million votes in all. 
Reformers and Communists were 
distant runners-up. Mr. Zhirin- 
ovsky was on the political map. 


By Alan Truscott 

Alice 

Dela- 
ware, who died of cancer in Febru- 
ary, was a member of the winning 
team in the Master Mixed Teams in 
Los Angeles, and the diagramed 
deal on which she sat South, was a 
factor. Her partner was her hus- 
band. Ivar Stakgold, a professor of 
mathematics who represented the 
United States in world champion- 
ships. 

Experts are divided on the choice 
of opening with the South hand 
Some would bid one club, allowing 
an easy development of the auc- 
tion. Mrs. Stakgold preferred one 
spade, showing the major suit im- 
mediately and in some situations 
making it difficult for the oppo- 
nents to locate a heart fiL 

North showed his trig hand with 
a jump to three hearts, and then 
used Blackwood to locate two aces 
and a king in the Sooth hand. He 
bid the grand dam in the full 
knowledge that a winning spade 
finesse might be needed. He wxild 
have been on firmer ground in this 
respect with Roman Key-card 
Bladcwood, a convention that has 
become popular since this deal was 
played. 

Seven spades was not a certainty,, 
but South had several chances. She 


won the opening diamond lead 
with dummy’s ace, and threw two 
dubs on dummy's heart winners. 
She then ruffed* a heart with the 
spade seven, and had no trouble 
when the queen appeared: Trumps 
were drawn and the grand slam was 
claimed. 

If the heart queen had not fallen. 
South’s main chance would have 
been to play East for the dab 
queen. But that would not have 
been needed if another heart ruff 
produced the queen and the trumps 
divided evenly. 

NORTH 

• Q J 10 4 

<7 A K J 10 3 

0 A 

*K62 

EAST (D) 

♦ 8 

096542 
O KQ874 
+ 53 
SOOTH 

* A K753 
O — 

C 652 

- +AJ974 

North and South were vulnerable. 


The father says William won't arid 
"that’s the point ” This stylized sto- 
ry is Cain and Abel, Jacob and 
Esau, played out beneath the Tow- 
er of BabeL William cannot help, 
betraying Clive. 

When he does, in the stray's last 
paragraphs, the narrative takes an 
astonishing turn. It’s possible to 
say, without ruining the reader’s 
enjoyment, that although the sub- 
ject is never named, “Batorsag and 
Szerelem” turns out to be a com- 
mentary on our relationship to 
AIDS and that the title means, in a 
language that, it turns out, Clive 
shares with some 1 1 million other 
people, “Courage and Love.” 

A motif of incompatible tongues 
runs through the book. In "City of 
Broken Hearts” a divorced father 
who speaks the language of male 
bonding, baseball and bar-scene 
womanizing is introduced by his 
son to the language of modem 
courtship. 

But the first and last stories, "Ac- 
countant” and “The Palace Thief,” 
are what turn the diverse narratives 
into a book. Each is told by a rigid, 
self-deceiving protagonist, reminis- 
cent of the butler m Kazuo Ishi- 
guro’s “The Remains of the Day.” 
Realism is abandoned for an ex- 
treme formality of voice that is in- 
herently comic. The eponymous ac- 
countant confesses, “I have worked 
diligently, and I do not mind saying 
that in the conscientious embrace of 
the ledger I have done well for my- 


self over the years, yet now 1 must 
also say that due to a flaw in my 
character 1 have allowed one small 
trespass against my honor.” 

lit each of the bookend stories, 
an inhibited protagonist is ob- 
sessed with a manipulative, power- 
ful man he has known for years. In 
confronting his opponent each 
over-scrupulous narrator is moved 
. to an uncharacteristic action that 
may or may not constitute a victory 
over fate. 

■ The accountant’s thoughts focus 
! on a high school classmate who has 
become a ‘multimillionaire entre- 
preneur’. Implying the possibility of 
a lucrative deal, the businessman 
invites the accountant to a baseball 
fantasy, camp. There, under the 
eyes of Willie Mays, the two reen- 
act their teenage infield competi- 
tion. When the accountant discov- 
ers that the playing field, even at 
baseball camp, is not level, be com- 
mits a small crime that cements his 
career and his self-understanding. 

In “The Palace Thief,” Mr. Hun- 
dert, a teacher of classics at an exdu- 

witb ac^arismatic and deceitful stu- 
dent, Sedgewick BetL As Hundert 
nears retirement, Bell, now a captain 
of industry, invites him to referee a 
reenactment of the school's ancient- 
histbry contest Bell cheated the first 
time. When he cheats again, H un- 
der! must face bis own limitations. 

The thief within is character, 
which robs us of love and courage. 
Bin there are other thieves: jealousy, 
time and age, even lan guage which 
hides us from each, other. These sto- 
ries comment on one another, and 
on Cariin's prior work, in delightful 
ways. The collection, particularly 
“Batorsag and Szerelem,” which is 
extraordinary for its craft and emo- 
tional effect, constitutes a broaden- 
ing of literary scope for a writer of 
enormous talent and charm. The 
stories are of interest both in them- 
selves and as a staging ground for a 
leap Cm in is preparing to make: 

Peter D. Kramer, a psychiatrist 
and author of “Listening to Prozac," 
wrote this for The Washington Post 


WEST 
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- - — T -■ 

LIVING IN THE U.S.? 

NOW PRINTED IN 
NEWVORK 

for Same Day 
delivery in Key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE. CALL 

1 - 800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK. CALL 212-752-3890) 


that year, be requested and was F ^ who. were active in Sba- 
seat an invitation to immigrate.^ lnm 3]^ assumed he was Jewish, 
brad. Israeli officials toe ad. - - 

Apparently, he never followed jt 
up, and soon found a new job. He 

* He w-as hired by the Mir PjWj*- 
ing House, an enterprise with more 
.. As 600 employees that needed 
^someone with a legal background- 

As at InyurkoUegiya, Mr. 
ovsky made a strong start ^ 


although he bad never before taken 
part in Jewish activities in Moscow. 
Mr. Zhirinovsky has denied he has 

any Jewish blood. ' ' 

“What did I want to use Shalom 
for?” he told a journalist inJ992. 
“To have a chance to speak.” 

In 1989, Mr. Zhirinovsky jenned 
forces with Vladimir Bogachev a 

v.«j . self-styled poet and composer he 

But as usual he became kn*. ^ m et at die Democratic Union 

around the office fur n* *rong ^ Mr ^ * 

opinions. His unti-Cummumvi work on a scheme to create 


news were so vehement _iha . 
soon attracted the aileron c> 
neighborhood party 
Within a year or two of Mr. 
aovsky-s arrival at Mir. the 
gv chief of the party’s branch egg 
contacted the head o» Mir- ^ 
mr Kartsev, and urged him W** 
miss Mr. Zhirinovsky. Mr. Kart**. - 


what he called the Uberal Demo- 
cratic Party of the Soviet Union. 
Impressed by Mr. Zhinnovsk/s or- 
atory legal background and lin- 
guistic ability. Mr- Bogachev invit- 
ed him into the fledgling party. . 

At the Liberal Democrats 
founding congress in March 1990. 


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Page 6 


MONDAY, MARCH 7, 1994 

O P I N I on 


f ,:!■ 


l 1tl 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



PIBLISHfLO WITH THK NKW YORK TIMKS A Nib THE WASH INI HI IN POST 


For the first time in some. 25 years, the 
American economy is glowing with health. A 
startling}- high growth rate has just bees 
reported for the last quarter of 1993, and 
steady progress is' widely forecast for this 
year. The inflation rate is low, by the stan- 
dard of recent decades, and unemployment 
has been declining. Private debtors are get- 
ting their finances in better order than in 
many years, and tbe federal deficit is drop- 
ping. the banking system has largely recov- 
ered from the crises and losses of the 1980s. 
it is possible to hope that the United States 
may be entering a period of stable prosperity 
unlike anything since the 1960s. 

But in the years of turbulence, a lot went 
wrong that even the smoothest of recoveries 
will not automatically remedy. One particu- 
larly ominous indicator is tbe increasingly 
unequal distribution of income, signaling a 
more rigid structure of social classes. The 
reasons involve the labor market's rising de- 
mands for education and advanced skiffs — 
and the inability of the educational system so 
far to respond adequately. 

Tbe widening gap between rich and poor, 
accompanied by an increasing population of 
uneducated and permanently unemployed 
young men. is in turn related to crime rates. If 
prosperity brings a rise in incomes that is 
concentrated in the richest fifth of tbe popula- 
tion, as in the past IS years, while the poorest 
fifth’s share declines, it is difficult to think 


Risking a Trade War 


Bill Clinton's decision to invoke a trade law 
provision that would enable him to impose 
lough sanctions against Japan if the Japanese 
fail to open their markets to American goods 
is unnecessary, dangerous, and misguided. 

Tbe political logic behind the president's 
move is understandable. Polls snow that a 
significant majority of Americans favor a 
tough stance toward the Japanese, and protec- 
tionists in Congress are pushing hard for re- 
taliation against Tokyo. But any crackdown 
by tbe United States could undermine the 
elaborately constructed international appara- 
tus for resolving trade disputes. 

Tbe provision invoked by Mr. Clinton, 
known as Super 301, triggers a timetable for 
Washington to decide unilaterally whether 
Japan, or any other country, is violating fair 
trade rules and if so what sanctions to impose. 
The key word is unilateral: under Super 301, 
the United States belittles its commitment to 
resolve disputes in multilateral settings. 

The provision is unnecessary because U.S. 
law already permits the government to retali- 
ate unilaterally against unfair trade prac- 
tices. That is risky enough, but Super 301 
hastens the process. 

Super 301 is dangerous because the added 
threat moves the United Stales one step 
closer to a trade war with an important ally 
and could undermine the fragile coalition of 
Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa, who is 
pushing a deregulatoiy agenda that would 
eventually break down protectionist barriers 
around Japanese markets. 

And the provision is misguided because it 
belies a profound misunderstanding about tbe 


Tango With North Korea 


The bargaining over North Korea’s nuclear 
program is back on track. But back on track to 
what? The dismal fact is that it is stffl not 
possible to tell whether, as stalwarts of non- 
proliferation intend, rogue North Korea is 
being drawn into a non-nuclear role in a 
community of nations or whether, as many 
suspect, it is prolonging negotiations in order 
to become a nuclear power. 

North Korea is no Soviet Union, an adver- 
sary that over time the United States success- 
fully drew Into a precarious but mutually 
reassuring sharing of nuclear knowledge and 
risk. For North Korea is not merely Commu- 
nist but, by choice, a hermit state that may 
well regard the prospect of international com- 
pany less as a benefit than as a dire threat to 
the stability and survival of the regime. 

In other circumstances a regime that acted 
with North Korea's irresponsibility would have 
to expect to pay. But none of those touched by 
Pyongyang’s bad faith is eager for a showdown 
with a paranoid and unpredictable regime. 
That is why North Korea's interlocutors — the 
United Stales, South Korea, the International 
Atomic Energy Agency —have felt it necessary 
to make what the State Department describes 


not as “cracessi cos,” although they are that, 
but as “prudent steps” to keep the hope of a 
non-nuclear North Korea alive. 

North Korea has stretched out and is still 
restricting inspections of the sort that the IAEA 
has just resumed, even though it undertook to 
permit full inspections in signing the Nudear 
Nonproliferation Treaty. It has wot assurances 
of talks with tbe U.S. and South Korean gov- 
ernments, and suspension of this year’s nriHtaiy 
exercises by tbe United States and South Ko- 
rea, although US. negotiators insist that these 
boons will not actually be delivered unless the 
North meets IAEA inspection demands. 

In Washington there is much dissatisfac- 
tion with this course, in and out of the admin- 
istration. The idea of a bomb in the hands of 
North Korea is insupportable all around. Bnt 
even critics who think that the administration 
is not tough enough with North Korea accept 
the main American strategy of first trying to 
block any further development of its nuclear 
capacity and only then going back to reverse 
whatever progress it may already have secretly 
attained. Firmness and consistency are re- 
quired in this uncertain but urgent quest 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


India in a Reckless Hurry? 

China started its market Teforms in- 1978, 
and has since been haring along. India, after 
small spurts of reform in tbe early and mid- 
dle years of the 1 980s, started again in ear- 
nest only in 1991. As the economic and 
political risks in China become ever more 
evident India's steadiness is looking increas- 
ingly attractive to investors. That makes the 
Indian budget announced on Feb. 28 espe- 
cially worrying, for it suggests that tbe gov : 
erament is prepared to risk stability, for a 


burst of speed. While continuing to liberalize 
the economy, the government seems to be 
ignoring the need for fiscal responsibility. 

India's impatience is understandable; it 
has been frustrating to watch its great rival 
pull ahead. But if inflation and government 
finances get out of control, the country could 
lose its reputation for steadiness. Asia's suc- 
cess stories argue that macroeconomic sta- 
bility is a necessary condition for long-term 
prosperity. The tortoise did not win by pre- 
tending to be a hare. 

— The Economist (London). 



■ International Herald Tribune . 

ESTABLISHED 1887 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Cii-Chaimttn 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher A Chief Executive 
JOHN VINOCUR. ErtatitirEdi** A Vke Pnsuirnt 

• WALTER WELLS, Non bfox • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
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that new wealth will make the United States a 
more pleasant or comfortable place to live. 

Rising incomes can provide the meins to 
strengthen society greatly, if society chooses 
to use than well. Rapid growth in the quarter- 
century after World War U provided the eco- 
nomic base lor two profound changes. Ameri- 
cans decided that every child should complete 
high school and, although that ideal has never 
been quite attained, the rise in the average 
level of education has made a powerful differ- 
ence for the better. Prosperity also greatly 
eased the process of racial desegregation. 
Growth made it possible to open opportuni- 
ties to black Americans without dosing them 
to white Americans. People who deprecate the 
importance of economic growth need to con- 
sider those two examples. 

In the 1980s, most of the increase in Ameri- 
can incomes went into health care, and Amer- 
icans now seem to be ambivalent about that. 
Most of them seem to fed that they don’t 
want that trend to continue indefinitely, but 
they are still far from agreeing what to do 
about iL If the country should now be fortu- 
nate enough to enter a time of stable prosperi- 
' ty, and if it should find a way to restrain 
health costs, the increase in its disposable 
wealth would once again be sufficient to 
promise large changes in American society. 
But nothing is guaranteed — least of afl tbe 
wisdom to use the money well. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


THIS?. ITS PURE 

Af?K ANSA* MONKEY 
RBM.hSWl.W- 
Of-caj&s. it'# 
snu-Au^g- , 



economic impact of trade deficits. Even if the 
United States were to compel Japan to buy 
more U.S. autos and computers, the overall 
U.S. trade deficit would not fall. Trade defi- 
dts are caused by Americans buying more 
goods and services than they produce. The 
extra goods must come from trade partners — 
if not from Japan, then from somCT/here rise. 

The admmlftration portrays the $60 billion 
trade deficit with Japan as an assault on jobs. 
But U.S. employment would not rise if Japan 
were to buy more goods from Ameri ca. Chair- 
man Alan Greenspan of the Federal Reserve 
recently said the Fed would raise interest rates 
to ward off inflation- In other words, the econo- 
my was pi cking up enough speed that the Fed 
decided to dampen domestic spending. If tbe 
Japanese were to spend more for American 
grods, Mr. Greenspan would tighten further. 
The important point is that employment rates 
are set by derisions in America, not in Japan, 
and Mr. Clinton’s alarms are false. 

True, specific U.S. industries — some of 
which are highly profitable, like computer 
software, insurance and medical equipment 
— are hurt by Japanese barriers. But opening 
up every Japanese market in right would not 
add modi to the $6 trillion U.S. economy. 

If invoking a strategy that could trigger tit- 
f or- tat sanctions pushes the Japanese to make 
further concessions or heads off even worse 
legislation in Congress, the strategy could be 
judged a political success. But if Mr. Clinton 
actually triggers a trade war or destabilizes the 
Hosokawa government, the price could turn 
oat to be very steep indeed. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Learning to Live With a Less Centralized China 


L ONDON — China's central gov- 
t eminent is lading in importance. 
The crisis of governance has major 
implications for tbe way in which the 
outride world deals with China. 

Market reforms that decentralize 
power have unglued important parts 
of tbe social fabric.. At a time of 
uncertainty over the succession to 
Deng Xiaoping, the authority of gov- 
ernment is seriously undermined. 

Beijing no longer has control over 
the economy. Attempts to impose an 
austerity plan in flrid-1993 were soon 
abandoned. Efforts lata in the year 
to impose a new tax structure so that 
the centra] government would stop 
losing so much revenue to the regions 
is being frustrated at lower levels. 

Provinces are acting, as the World 
Bank has noted, like increasingly in- 
dependent agents. The percentage of 
trade done between provinces is fall- 
ing as they expand contacts with the 
outride world. Tbe official media 
worry openly about protectionism 
and trade wars between provinces. 

■ The loosening of central authority 
has caused a sharp rise in the drug 
and gun trade and in associated rales 


By Gerald Segal 


of crime and drug addiction. China 
has a floating population of 130 mil- 
lion, and another 2 00 million people 
are surplus to the requirements of the 
rural economy. Mass migration on 
this scale would be the largest such 
flow in human history. 

This is looming at a time when 
senior Chinese military leaders are 
w arning tha t social decay is gating 
away at tbe morale and professional- 
ism of the armed faces. 

* External trade is increasingly a 
matter that need .not involve contact 
with the central government. Beijing 
cannot enforce existing international 
accords, for example on trade in tex- 
tiles or the observance of copyright, 
because it does not control those 
parts of the economy where viola- 
tions lake place. 

The weakness of the central govern- 
ment accounts for growing problans 
along the southwestern frontier where 
the trade in guns, drugs and even 
women sold into prostitution in 
Southeast Asia is out of control. The 
rise of lawlessness is also evident in the 


increase in piracy off China's coast. 
Sane of these naval entrepreneurs 
turn their boats into transports for the 
illegal migration of more than 100,000 
Chinese a year. At least 20,000 of them 
end up in the United States, with dou- 
ble that number entering Europe. Bei- 
jing cannot control the flow. 

The weakness of central govern- 
ment extends to relations with Hong 
Kong and Taiwan. One of the reascos 
why Britain is able to take such a 
rough line on Hong Kong is that BeL 


investment°trom the British colony 
and wants to get on with business. 

. Taiwan is finding that increasing 
economic convergence with southern 
China m eans dial Beijing has less 
power .over both Taiwan and south- 
ern China. A struggle that was once 
between China and Taiwan is now 
much more complex. 

In short, China is changing shape. Jt 
is thus becoming all tbe more impor- 
tant to deal with the parts where real 


decisions are made. On many issues, 
ihai means dealing with provinces and 
with lower levels of government 

Many foreign governments would 
welcome a more decentralized China 
because that would weaken Bering’s 
ability to puisne a nationalist agenda 
in its numerous territorial disputes 
with other Asian slates, and on other 
issues- Yet on some issues,, such as 
enforcing global agreements under 
GATT, outriders have an interest in a 
centralized China. 

There is much that stops short of a 
formal breakup of China which would 
offer the outride woritf the opportuni- 
ty of constructive dialogue with the 
largest country in the world. Itmdy be 
that the way to ensure that China does 
not become more dangerous as it 
grows richer and strongs- is to ensure 
that in practice, if not in law, there is 
more item one China to deal with. 

The writer is a senior fellow at the 
International Institute for Strategic 
Studies, in London, which releases a 
report this Monday entitled “ China 
Changes Shape.” Me contributed this 
comment to die Herald Tribune. . 


: Herald Tribune.. 


A Gloomy Vision of Anarchy Sweeping the World 


N EW YORK — A particular nightmare, for 
most human, bongs, would be to live in a 
society without order of any kind, without predict- 
ability: in a country that has no effective govern- 
ment, subject to crime and disease and primitive 
rapacity without recourse to any saving authority. 

That is tiie future foreseen for much rf the worid 
in a chilling and, alas, com pelling article, The 
Craning Anarchy." It is by Robert D. Kaplan, who 
has reported from many parts of the world and 
written among other books “Balkan Ghosts." His 
anti-utopian virion of the future appeared in the 
February issue of the Atlantic Monthly. 

Mr. Kaplan's theme is that maps, with their neat 
boundaries and colors, have little to do with reality 
in much of the world. Borders and the very states 
(hat they supposedly contain are disintegrating 
under the pressures of povmy, population growth, 
lawlessness and the resulting chaos. 

The oncomm| reality is exemplified by West 
Africa, Mr. Kaplan says. In both the French- and 
tbe English-speaking states, hardwood forests are 
cut down at an accelerating rate. Populations move 
from the interior to the litoral towns, where they 
live in shantytowns presenting “a Dickensian spec- 
tacle to winch Dickens himself would never have 
given credence." Rebellion and massacre flow 
across national boundaries, and government's writ 
does not run outside a few towns — in tbe daytime. 

Mr. Kaplan sees West Africa becoming “the 
symbol of worldwide demographic, environmental 
and societal stress, in which criminal anarchy 


By Anthony Lewis 

emerges as the real ‘strategic' danger." He sees a 
world of “disease, overpopulation, unprovoked 
crime, scarcity of resources, refugee migrations, 
the increasing erosion of nation states ..." 

As a grim example, be describes Sierra Leone, 
which was once a pleasant small West African 
country. Now it is riven by half a dozen armies and 
local warlords. There can be — there is — no law. 

“Sierra Leone is a microcosm of what is occur- 
ring. albeit in a more tempered and gradual man- 
ner," Mr. Kaplan writes, “throughout West Africa 
and much of the underdeveloped wodd: the with- 
ering away of central governments, the rise of 
tribal and regional domains, the unchecked spread 
of disease and the growing pervasiveness of war." 

When there are riots and other violent upheavals 
around the world, be says, the press ascribes them to 
ethnic and religious conflicts. “But as these conflicts 
multiply, it will become apparent that something 
else is afoot, making more and more places like 
Nigeria, India and Brazil ungovernable." 

Mr. Kaplan's “something else” begins with envi- 
ronmental scarcity. He recognizes that many West- 
erners yawn at the word “environment,’’ or mock 
iL But he argues persuasively that it is “the nation- 
al-security issue of the early 21st century." 

■The political and strategic impact of surging 
populations, spreading disease, deforestation and 
soil erosion, water depletion, air pollution and. 


possibly, risin« sea levels in critical, overcrowded 
regions like the Nile Delta arid Bangladesh — 
developments that will prompt mass migrations 
and. in turn, incite group conflicts — will be the 
core foreign policy challenge." 

In the next 50 years the earth’s population is 
expected to grow [rum the present 5.5 billion people 
to more than 9 billion. If all the world had the 
agricultural and industrial levels of the developed 
countries, that growth might be manageable. But 95 
percent of the increase wifi be in the poorest regions, 
where governments have trouble functioning as it is. 

Mr. Kaplan cites India and Pakistan as coun- 
tries where the question of democracy “is less and 
less relevant to the larger issue of governabllity." 
He asks whether the central bureaucracy in New 
Delhi is the best mechanism to improve the lives of 
tbe diverse peoples of India — 866 million now, 
approaching 1.5 billion by 2025. 

Given overworked croplands, declining water 
levels and communal tensions, be says, “it is 
difficult to imagine that the Indian state will 
survive the next century." 

Is Mr. Kaplan too gloomy? Probably. Human 
beings have astonishing resilience, and so do their 
political constructs. Recent trends in places such 
as lodia and Latin America have been favorable at 
least on the surface. But his assessment re mind s us 
that there are longer-run concerns, showing us 
convincingly that the real issues of the future are 
not those that preoccupy us today. . 

The New York Times. . 


Great Powers Shouldn’t Play Chauvinistic Games 


H ong kong — what do bui 

Clinton’s resurrection of Super 
301 trade sanctions and China’s brief 
rearrest of the dissident Wei Jing- 
sheng have in common? Both deci- 
sions are at best gambles bordering 
on the irrational 

The damage that one decision 
could do to fragile international trade 
relationships and the other to an un- 
easily balanced U.S.-Chinese rela- 
tionship is well in excess of any gains 
to be made from them. They are in 
effect gestures of frustration based 
not on rational assessment of current 
objectives but on emotions derived 
from earlier experiences. Ixr both 
cases there is an dement of “to beQ 
with foreigners." 

It would be easy to explain the 
arrest of Mr. Wei and other dissi- 
dents in advance of Secretary of 
State Warren Christopher's arrival 
in Beijing this Friday, and while re- 
newal of most-favored trade status 
is in the balance, as an attempt by 
the anti-Deng faction to derail U.S.- 
Chinese relations and thus the open- 
door economic policy. 

After all, where would that policy 
now be without southern China's ex- 
ports to the United States, and the 
seal of approval and permanence that 
U-S. investment bankers have helped 
give China's “socialist market" eco- 
nomic transformation? 

Such a conspiracy may emerge af- 
ter Deng Xiaoping’s death. But in 
fact it appears not to have been be- 
hind last week’s actions of the Public 
Security Bureau to crack down on 
dissidents before the National Peo- 
ple's Congress convenes this week. 

Yet it is hard to see how any dam- 
age or embarrassment that the dissi- 
dents might cause during the Con- 


By Philip Bo wring 


gress session , could outweigh tbe 
damage done ip Deogist economics 
by a breakdown in relations with the 
United States. 

Clearly .then, Beijing is gambling 
that the perceived interest of Ameri- 
can big business in maintaining the 
China unk will outweigh the pressure 
from the human rights and democra- 
cy lobbies, almost regardless of what 
the Public Security Bureau does. 

Beijing’s calculation is probably 
right, but it is a big risk for a small 
gain. So one must conclude that part 
of the motivation is resentment 
against U.S.“interference," a desire 
to be seen not to be taking instruc- 
tions from erstwhile imperialists. 

A nrtrilar strand is evident in Chi- 
na's policy on Hong Kong; For all 
Beijing's appearance of bong long- 
term and cerebral its policies toward 
the outside world are often driven as 
much by 'emotions and historical as- 
sumptions as by cool calculation. 
China is jusi like other countries. 

It Mr: Wei’s arrest was a blunder, 
Soper 301 is a blunderbuss. It ap- 
pears to have no dear objective other 
than to frighted Japan. In fact, it has 
angered. Japan ana irritated most of 
America’s other trading partners, 

There are ^dozens of countries — 
China among the most prominent — 
that have far worse records of -non- 
tarifr barriers than Japan's. 

As an isolated event, the Super 301 
threat might not matter so much. But 
it has come so hard on the heels of the 
Clinton administration's attempt to 
make an international incident out of ■ 
Japan's reasonable reluctance to have 
Motorola phones forced on its con- 
sumers that it becomes- ever more 


apparent that Japan- bashing is an 
end in itself, if opening op Japanese 
markets is the objective, why choose 
an issue on which Japan’s other trad- 
• ing partners — with technology that 
is at least as competitive — have no 
complaints? Why not find common 
ground with some other countries so 
that issues can be discussed other 
than on a bilateral basis? Why the 
sudden demand for managed trade 
when the United Stales spent the pre- 
vious decade fighting the idea? 

U.S. trade pronouncements have 
been confusing three separate issues: 
access for specific products and ser- 
vices where there is real evidence of 
barriers against foreigners; structur- 
al often quasi -cultural impediments 
to imports which can only wither 
slowly; and the trade balance itsdf. 
which is partly structural and partly 
cyclical and is only tangentially relat- 
ed to the trade access question. 

This confusion, perhaps deliber- 
ately created for domestic political 
consumption, is causing the United 
States to gamble with global relation- 
ships to spite Japan yet without hav- 
ing any weQ-defmed trade objectives. 
The motive seems to be not so-much 
to improve the trade balance as to 
punish Japan for past sins. 

In the process, Washington has 
generated considerable sympathy for 
Japan in such improbable quarters as 
Seoul and Brussels. 

The one thing that ail Japan's part- 
ners, whether in Europe. America or 
Asia, have in common is a desire ro 
see domestic demand growth in Ja- 
pan. Washington’s fixation with mak- 
ing the yen ever more overvalued is 
having the opposite effect. Japanese 


companies are hurting. But the over- 
all effect is simultaneously to depress 
domestic demand while impeding 
further interest rate cuts. Die macro- 
economic issues are the ones which 
matter most, bat they have been over- 
whelmed by the fist-waving. 

Die outlook is grim if a China 
facing post-Deog trauma and an in- 
coherent U.S. adimnistratioa want- 
ing distractions from Whitewater let 
chauvinism off the leash. - 

International Herald Tribune 


In its last decade tbe KGB dominau. _ 
this loathsome traffic. In contrast, the 
major Soviet defectors in that period 
came over not for money but because 
they saw the failure and inevitable 
doom of a bankrupt Soviet system. 

The Ames case displays a third 
characteristic of the class system, even 
one as small as an old- boys" network. 
A self -contained aristocracy is eventu- 
ally corrupted or overwhelmed by 
money. Treating espionage p rimari ly 
as a marketplace activity exposed the 
agents of the CIA to the virus of 


betrayal through greed. If be is guilty 
as charged, Aldrich Hazen Arnes be- 
came One of Them for money. 

The Washington Post. 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 

1894: Troubled Balkans tries as France and Italy. It is im- 
frankforton-the-main - ESftSS 3E5K# Sc 

The Eastern question is assuming vessels, for should the ships be dis- 

iSl'JSiSW* tributed in proportion to a country's 
cowuof thetroubte mMonumegro mval activities m tbe war Great Bni- 
and Serna, which, if not shortly pan- ain would receive at least half of them. 
Tied, may endanger the peace of Eu- 
rope. Russia contributes annually 1044,. Allfos in Rm-ma 
large sums of money among the Sla- ***" iJnrma 

vonic races of the Balkan States and NEW DELHI — [From our New 
of Austria, nominally from religious York edition:] American infantry 
motives, but in reality for political anils, in action for the first time on 
purposes. According to Austrian re- the Asiatic continent, have opened an ' 
ports great dissatisfaction prevails in attack in northern Burma under the 
Montenegro in regard to this. • direction of Lieutenant General Jo- 
- sepb W. Stillwell who has sworn he 

ly IV: German! leet ^hdfof™ wilh theJa P ar3e&e . ror the 

PA RIS — ■ ■ Disposition or the German years ago. Veteransoin lE^nBinf 

5^J he J , ?Sf?S V s ^ Guadafcanal arid the soutin^i Pa- 

A yesterday s {March 6] meeting of cific. scoring their first success in the 
die Council of Ten, situng as the drive to open a short cut to China's 
Supreme War Council, and much Burma Road, have inarched 200 
progress was made. All -the powers miles through the thick bush and 
are now m favor of tbe destrixenon of struck the enemy a surprise blow 
the Hun warships, after allotting sev- from the rear, a communique from 
era! of ibe larger units to such conn- Stillwell's headquarters announced. 


Cross Over* 


- * ..By Jim Hoagfa nd 

W ASHINGTON — Aldrich Ha- 
ztffl Ames, the spy with three 
last names, might hot have ran his 
scam so line had he been, plait Fred 
Jones or Billy Bob Smith. His fellow 
spooks might have been more suspi- 
aous when he drove to work one dav 
in a new Jaguar, fresh from his mori- 


’ • -Does the still unfolding Ames case 
reveal the Central Intelligence Agency 
•as a mini dass systan that hasoutfived 
its social and economic usefulness? 

■ -It is grand&se overstatement to re- 
fer lo an intelligence agency as a class 
system. What we are really talking 
about is an cM boys’ network — a 
network that also revolves around the 
central notions of a dass system: in- 
herited privilege and social solidarity. 

Those notions permeate tbe case of 
the 52-year-old former head of coun- 
terintelligence now accused of havina 

e xl. v tz_ fi v- .7® 


the agency before even finishing co{- 
lege because of his father’s good re- 
cord there. He was. the dd boys at the 
agency decided. One of Us. 

A sense of sodal solidarity may help 
explain why a spy agency spending 
$30 billion B- year to discover the 
worid’s most guarded secrets failed to 
see a significant change of behavjor 
undcr its nose. There are some things 
that One of. Us is not expected to do. 

Director R. James Woolsey repo" 
edly said as much when he informed 
QA. employees of Mr. Ames's arrest 
A Washington Post account para- 
phrased him as saying on closed rir- 
aril .television that be found the be- 
trayal hard to comprehend “involving 
as it did both harm to the country and 
a violation of a spy’s personal and 
professional obligations." 

Thai is the mind-set that produced 
the CIA’s failure to follow Ronald 
Reagan's most famous dictum: Trust 
but verify. Tbe spy-masters trusted 
Mr. Ames but did not verify his bank 
accounts. Indeed, the agency does not 
seem to have asked to see mem. 

Ex-director Robot M. Gates bris- 
tled on television when journalists sug- 
gested that this may possibly have 
been an error. Congress did not order 
us to check employees' bank accounts. 
Mr. Gates said by way of explanation. 
The agency was anoranfortable about 
being lob “intrusive’’ in the lives of its 
employees, he added. 

1 doubt that delicacy about intru- 
siveness really explains the agency's 
failure in the Ames case. I rhmk the 
spy^masters missed a crucial turn in 
their business, much as Pirilco stuck 
with radios at toe dawn of the televi- 
sion era and IBM let its disdain for 
laptop computers undermine its cor- 
porate foundations. -J 

Tbe agency seems to have stuclT 
with the idea that what One of Us 
doesn't do is spy for trig money. In- 
ternal controls are designed to weed 
out or capture ideological turncoats 
or agents caugit in the familiar KGB 
honey pot trap of compromising sex- 
ual situations that expose fallen 
agents to blackmail. 

Die CIA was run in a tweedy Ivy 
League fashion in its first decades and 
has remained deeply influenced by toe 
Anglophilia of its founders. Ideology 
and/or sex were at the core of Britain’' 
big spy cases. The CLVs fLrsl line o r 
counterespionage defease assumed, 
perhaps unconsciously, that toe same 
would be true for American spies. 

Times change: In the 1980s the 
Walker family, Ronald Pel ton and 
other cash-short Americans got big 
bonuses fra 1 agoing with the KGB and 
selling their country secret by secret. 
In- a world of satellite photography 
and electronic survefllance, spies con- 
centrated more and more on the com- 
merce of turning each other's coats. 

Seventy to 80 percent of a CIA 
coven agent's working hours is spent 
on one activity: hying to recruit his or 
her opposite number in toe Kremlin’s 
secret service. That estimate comes 
from several CIA Add agents, all 
speaking with the same tones of frus- 
tration over this misplaced expendi- 
ture of time and effort. 

This is marketplace activity, toe 
buying and selling of careers and lives. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 7, 1994- 


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i ' By Peter Behr 

\t Washington Pan Service 

£ WASHINGTON — Americans 
arc more pessmusiic about United 
States relations with Japan since 
u ..the breakdown of trade talks last 
. ^nranth between President Bill Clin- 
ic® wd Prime Minister Marihiro 
a Hbsokawa than they were eight 
.^monihs ago, according to a Wash- 
lr ingJ on Post/ ABC News Poll 
But Secretary of State Warren 

- jM. Christopher, on an Asian tour 
t . that wU include high-level meei- 
t: >ngs with the Japanese, said in Ha- 
i wan: “f do not think there will be a 
--trade war. The steps the United 
- . States has taken are steps that en- 

able us to have a dialogue with 

- Japan, they are steps that look for- 

- . ward to a solution to this problem.” 
£»• Asked in the survey about rela- 
«/* lions between the countries, 58 per- 

cent of the 1.531 adults questioned 
v Feb. 24-27 said they would de- 
*. J scribe jhem as “not so good” or 
“poor.” In June, 44 percent re- 
,.*■ sponded that way and 31 percent 
• i did so in November 1991. 

In the recent poll 38 percent said 
•' relations were excellent or good, 
'■ compared with 50 percent in June 
’- and 64 percent in November 1991. 

■ ! ”Ihe 1991 poll was taken two 

months before a trip by Former 

- President George Bush to Tokyo, 

• ■’during which trade disputes be- 

tween the two countries were high- 
lighted. 

“• On Feb. 1 1, Mr. Clinton and Mr. 
jj- Hosokawa said they had failed to 
-* reach an agreement on reducing 
^Japan’s global trade surplus. 

, Of those questioned in February, 
-7 31 percent said they thought U.S.- 

* Japanese relations were “getting 
' worse,” up from 17 percent in June 

-7 and 15 percent in 1991. 

. Half of those surveyed last 

■ ' month said they “generally have a 
..favorable" impression or Japan, 

iV down from 60 percent in 1991, but 
' ’7 unchanged since June. By a margin 
. : of 56 to 41 percent in the recent 
i poll, those questioned agreed that 
I ^ 14 the United States should close 
American markets to more Japa- 
: 1 nese products,” up from 52 percent 
“ in June. 

But almost 80 percent of those 
7 questioned in February said they 
agreed that “the United States 
t- should pressure American busi- 
/ nesses to try harder to do business 
7 in Japan” 



Later Vote Sign - Up 
Urged by Mandela 


Reuters 


PJETERSBUJtG, South Africa — Nelson Mandela, rbe African 
National Congress leader, said Sunday that the deadline for parties 
to register for South Africa's first all- race election should be extend- 
ed. 

The formal deadline to register for the election next month elapsed 
at midnight Friday. 


Mr. Mandela, speaking hours after gunmen killed 1 1 blacks in an 
YC section of the Bhambayi settlement near Durban, called for 


ANC 


Alena Franco- Pro* 

A woman saluting Nelson Mandela at an ANC campaign rally. 


extra registration time to enable aD organizations, including extrem- 
ist white and black groups, to register. 

“1 am prepared to go down on my knees to ensure there is peace in 
this country,” Mr. Mandela said at a campai gn rally in the northern 
Transvaal town of Petersburg. 

The African National Congress suggested that the rival Inkatha 
Freedom Party was responsible for the attack Sunday by about 20 
gunmen and said such massacres were the worst possible intimida- 
tion. “The massacre was allegedly perpetrated by the IFP," a 
statement said, adding that there could be “no talk of freedom of 
political activity" while such massacres continued and “the guilty 
persons are not apprehended.” 

“The killers and selfish spoilers must be isolated and defeated 
once and for all at the ballot box.” it added. 

Mr. Mandela said there would be no peace if some players 
remained outside the electoral process. U I am prepared to talk to 
these who have refused to register,” he said. “We must develop 
absolute patience and the ability to understand the fears of others.” 

He said he would urge the Independent Election Commission to 
extend the registration deadline so that as many parties as possible 
could take pan. 

Most major groups have signed up for the election, set for April 26 
to 28. including the Inkatha Freedom Party, but not the white 
rightist Afrikaner People's From or the government of the nominally 
independent Bophulhalswana black homeland. 

The co-leader of the Afrikaner People's Front, General Consland 
Viljoen. registered on Friday, saying he wanted to keep his parry's 
“options open.” But the party’s full leadership voted on Saturday to 
withdraw the registration. 

■ Accord on Ties to Vatican 

The Vatican and South Africa agreed over the weekend to estab- 
lish full diplomatic lies, The Associated Press reported. 


Russia Gets 
First Load 
Of Ukraine 
Warheads 


Death Rate Rises 
As Russians Worry 


Male Life Expectancy Crashes 


Kohl Barometer: The Race for Presidency 


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ROME — Seven people died 
' r Sunday when a bus carrying pB- 
' '* grims to Rome caught fire on a 
-. highway sooth of Naples. Italian 
_ radio reported. 


By Craig R- Whitney 

New York Tima Service 

BONN — Johannes Rau ran 

r 'nst Chancellor Helmut Kohl in 
1987 elections and lost Now he 
is hoping to win the largely ceremo- 
nial job of the German presidency 
this spring, and if he does it will 
bode no good for Mr. Kohl in the 
October national elections. 

That, Mr. Rau fears; could be his 
biggest handicap. 

“The main thing that will be de- 
cided in May is who will be presi- 
dent for the next five years, not 
whether the government will 
change in October.” said Mr .Rau, 
63, the Social Democratic governor 
of North Rhin e-Westphalia. 

Both he and his main opponent, 
Roman Herzog, 59, a Christian 
Democratic civil servant and politi- 
cian who is now president of the 
Federal Constitutional Court in 
Karlsruhe, are running hard, turn- 
ing the vote for the presidency by a 
special assembly that will meet in 
Berlin on May 23 from a ceremoni- 
al yawn into a suspense-filled 
showdown. 

Politicians say the only way Mr. 
Rau could win the presidency 


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AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Vii^inia Students 
Retain Honor Code 


Students at the University of 
Virginia have voted overwhelm- 
ingfyto retain thezr 152-year- 
old honor system, one of the 
oldest and strictest in the Unit- 
ed States. _ . 

Under the student-adminis- 
tered honor code, anyone found 
guilty of cheating, lying or 
stealing is subject to one penal- 
ty: expulsion. And hy nearly 3 
to 1. students voted to keep it 
tha t way on the campus found- 
ed by Thomas Jefferson in 
Charlottesville. 

About 6,500 of the universi- 
ty’s 1 8,000 students voted, more 
than three times a normal turn- 
out. 

Critics had urged making the 
system more flexible by allow- 
ing one-year suspensions for 
some cases. 

“Automatic expulsions and 
the obligation to report other 
students have historicaDy not 
worked very well anywhere.” 
said Gary Pa vela, director of 
the National Center for Aca- 
demic Integrity in CoDege Park, 
Maryland. “People on hearing 
committees are extremely reluc- 
tant to find someone guilty. 

100 honor cases a year 


Of 1W Uinim — ~ — / 

investigated at Viipma, about 


40 students are charged. Of 
those, about a dozen admit guilt 
and leave the university. Ntariy 
half of those who do not admit 
guilt are found guilty after a 


trial. 


Short Takes 


A New Jersey Mafioso says 
hedefected tobecomea govero- 
« because the Moo 


neuraecicu w - 

ment witness because the Mob 
bad lost its standards — an 

. _ 1 .. la MMtAV 


aaa ium 

they care about is money, not 
honor” Choosing bttweet 1 a 


honor. -77- , 

probable underworld dejJ 
threat and a certain 30-to-W- 


utreat auu a . 

year nrison sentence for racke- 
teering and extortion unlessfte 
cooperated with the aulhonUK. 
Anthony Acoetturo 55, det^- 
ed from the Lvcchese mroe 
family. “The new generation 
that is running things threw aD 
the old "lies out the 

he told The New York Timgin 

an interview in a 5 J® 1 ? 
where he is being held m a wt* 
ness protection wing. ‘* e , 

the Mob “is no Ionian 

orable secret society, th^ 
glamour like m the movies, ana 


most of the families are becom- 
ing street gangs.” 


Hospitals are begpuring to in- 
doctrinate interns to help bring 
down health-care costs by not 
ordering unnecessary tests. At 
Long Island Jewish Medical 
Center in Hyde Park, New 
York, doctors in training spend 
a day with the nurses who give 
the tests. At the University of 
Minnesota, interns spend two 
weeks with a clinic business 
manager to study costs. The 
goal. The New York Tunes re- 
ports, is to mm out “a revolu- 
tionary new breed of doctors — 
sensitive to patients and nuraes 
and aggressive about holding 
down hospital costs." 


Showing that he is no grind). 
Governor William Weld of 
Massachusetts has earmarked 
$600,000 of state funds to build 
a monument to the children’s 
author Dr. Seuss in Springfield. 
Theodor Gdsel, better known 
by his pen name, died in 1991 at 
87. A Springfield native, he 
wrote such books as “The Cat 
in the Hat" and “How the 
Grinch Stole Christmas.” The 
city plans to contribute 
$250,000 and the Springfield 
Library and Museums Associa- 
tion, $600,000. 


A lawsuit by a Los Angeles 
County judge who claimed he 
had been defamed by a parody 
was dismissed by the Calif ornia 
Court of Appeal. The majority 
opinion, written by the presid- 
ing justice, David Sills, said, 
“The formality land, no doubt 
on too many occasions, outright 
pomposity)' of judges and legal 
proceedings provide rich 
ground for mockery and par- 
ody” 

Plays that flop on or en route 
to Broadway often suffer the 
additional indignity of being 
given farcical nicknames. Thus, 
after a quick close, the 1991 
“Nick and Nora.” featuring 
Nick and Nora Charles and 
their dog, Asia, became “Asia 
la Vista/ An ill-fated 1984 pro- 
duction of - “Henry V” became 
“Hank Sank.” A similarly 
doomed “Richard Ijrbecame 
“Richard Ay-yi-yi. The 1983 
musical “Dance a Little Closer 
lasted just one performance, 
and was thereafter known as 
“Close a Little Faster.” In 1989, 
Gloria De Haven was dismissed 
during rehearsals as the star of 
-The Prince of Central Park ; 
the play lasted four perfor- 
mances 'and earned the nick- 
name, “Ain’t Miss De Haven.” 


Arthur Tfigbee 


would be with voles from Mr. 
Kohl's coalition partners, the Free 
Democrats, who plan to back their 
own candidate, Hildegard H amrrv - 
BrQcher, on the first two ballots. 

The assembly is expected to take 
three ballots to decide, because 
there are four presidential candi- 
dates in all and none are expected 
to win the majority it takes to be 
elected in the first or second 
rounds. 

This is because the special as- 
sembly comprises the 662-member 
parliament, which is dominated by 
Mr. Kohl’s Christian Democrats, 
plus an additional 662 electors pro- 
portionally chosen to reflect party 
strengths in the 16 state parlia- 
ments, where Mr. Rau’s Social 
Democrats are stronger. 

But if enough Free Democrats 
supported Mr. Rau instead of Mr. 
Herzog on the decisive third ballot, 
when the candidate with the largest 
number of votes wins, h would 
probably doom their 12-year coali- 
tion with Mr. KohL 

“I am counting on the possibility 
that the third ballot could go in my 
favor ” said Mr. Rau, a lifelong 
Social Democrat who has been gov- 
ernor of North Rhine-Westphalia 
since 1978. 

Mr. Herzog was named by Mr. 
Kohl after his first choice, Steffen 
Heitmann, a conservative from 
Eastern Germany, withdrew after a 


series of calamitously awkward in- 
terviews in which he suggested that 
Germans should some day be al- 
lowed relief from the stigma of 
Nazi war crimes. 

“1 would try to find the right 
tone." Mr. Rau said at a recent 
dinner with foreign journalists. “I 
would tell German young people 
that there is no such thing as collec- 
tive guilt, but that there is such a 
thing as collective shame. You have 
a lot of advantages that come from 
being bom into the German peo- 
ple, and you can't expect to escape 
the burdens that come with it, too.” 

Mr. Herzog is a modest man 
whom Mr. Kohl plucked out of 
relative obscurity mainly to keep 
the presidency from going to his 
opponents by default 

“If the office gets me," he said in 
the weekly magazine Stern, “I’m 
not going "to change.” 

whoever is the next German 
president will, have a hard time liv- 
ing up to the reputation of the ih- 
combent, Richard von Weizsacker, 
a Christian Democrat who has 
been telling Germans to reconcile 
themselves with their neighbors’ 
historical fear of them, and with 
their own conflicted feelings about 
each other. 

Public-opinion polls say that if 
the elections were held today, the 
Social Democrats would win them 
with 38 percent of the vote, less 


than the 43.8 percent that Mr. Kohl 
won in 1990 but more than the 33 
percent approval rating the polls 
give him now. 

But Mr. Rau is not counting on 

any thin g 

“The Social Democrats always 
have their best poll results when 
there's no election," he said. “The 
race isn’t over. I just hope we get a 
government that is capable of mak- 
ing decisions.” 

In the past, some German presi- 
dents have been elected by consen- 
sus among the political parties — 
something both Mr. Rau and Mr. 
Kohl say was discussed in his case 
two years age. 

Mr. Kohl for his part, seems 
annoyed that Mr. Rau wanted the 
job badly enough to campaign 
openly for it at a time when the 
chancellor thought that if there was 
to be a commonly agreed candi- 
date, it ought to be somebody from 
Eastern Germany. Former Foreign 
Minister Hans Dietrich Genscher, 
who came from there originally, 
declined to run. 

Mr. Kohl’s new candidate, like 
his opponent, is doing the best he 
can to soothe ruffled feelings. 

It was nothing other than “West- 
ern German imperialism,” Mr. 
Herzog said recently, to think of 
unification as a process in which 
people from the West told people 
in the East what they had to do. 


Compiled hy Our Staff From Pispadus 

MOSCOW -—The first trainload 
of Ukrainian nuclear warheads to 
be dismantled bv Russia under a 
disarmament agreement arrived in 
Russia on Sunday, a Defense Min- 
istry spokesman said. 

The train carried 60 warheads _ 
that will be disassembled under the' 
pact, in which Ukraine has agreed 
to give up its nuclear weapons in 
exchange for nuclear fuel for its 
power plants. 

The agreement 10 eliminate 176 
long-range missiles and more than 
1 ,600 nuclear warheads was signed 
in January by President Leonid M. 
Kravchuk of Ukraine. President 
Bill Clinton and the Russian presi- 
dent. Boris N. Yeltsin. 

Mr. Clinton, at the end of a visit 
to Washington by Mr. Kravcbuck, 
announced Friday he would double 
aid to the former Soviet republic to 
$700 milli on as a reward for nucle- 
ar disarmament and economic re- 
form. 

Ukraine has yet to ratify the Nu- 
clear Nonproliferation Treaty, and 
some Ukrainian lawmakers say giv- 
ing up the arms would threaten the 
country’s security and status. 

Mr. Kravchuk, in an interview 
broadcast from Washington, sug- 
gested on Saturday that Ukraine 
had more pressing problems than 
nuclear disarmament. 

“Fulfillment of all agreements, 
including agreements 00 nuclear 
commitments, is possible only if 
the economy works.” he said. “If 
tomorrow factories come to a halt 
in Ukraine, and this is a reality if 
there is no gas, what carrying out of 
commitments can be spoken of?” 

Moscow, which says Kiev owes it 
1J trillion roubles (S900 million) 
for natural gas, has been reducing 
deliveries to Ukraine since the start 
of the month to try to force 
Ukraine to pay. It cut daily deliver- 
ies by a further 80 million cubic 
meters this weekend, bringing sup- 
plies down to about 30 million cu- 
bic meters a day, or a quarter of 
normal levels. (Reuters, AP) 


By Michael Specter 

New York 77 mo Service 

MOSCOW — With a society so 
nervous about the future that it has 
all but slopped having children, 
and a death rate rising faster than 
that of any other country. Russia 
faces a population crisis that even 
optimists say will take a generation 
to reverse. 

Life expectancy of adult men has 
plummeted to 60 years, Russian 
and Western demographers say. 
That means that men in Indonesia, 
the Philippines and parts of Africa 
live longer than the average man in 
Russia today. 

At the same time, the number of 
children bom to each woman — an 
average of 2.17 only five years ago 
— has fallen to slightly more than 
1.4. 

The results have been startling, 
and so are the implications for a 
country already stru gg ling to rise to 
its feet after decades or Communist 
rule: Deaths exceeded births by 
nearly 800,000 last year, making 
Russia the first industrial country 
to experience such a sharp decrease 
in its population for reasons other 
than war, famine or disease. 

If the trend continues, and in 
most regions it appears to be get- 
ting worse, the country’s popula- 
tion of 148.4 million "will shrink 
sharply in the coining years. 

“It isjust an incredibly clear pic- 
ture of a society in crisis.” said 
David Coleman, a lecturer in de- 
mographics at Oxford University, 
who has focused on population 
trends in Eastern Europe and the 
countries of the former Soviet 
Union. “A decline in life expectan- 
cy this dramatic has never hap- 
pened in the postwar world. 

“It is really very staggering, it 
shows the malaise" of society, the 
lack of public health awareness and 
the fatigue associated with people 
who have had to fight a pitched 
battle their whole lives jusi to sur- 
vive." 

The reasons are varied. An epi- 
demic of alcohol abuse is at least 
partly to blame, as is severe envi- 
ronmental pollution. And part of 


the grim picture can be attributed 
to new birth and death statistics, 
whicb for the first time in decades 
actually reflect the bleak reality of 
life in Russia. 

Infant mortality rates have risen 
for years; the high rate of abortions 
leaves many women unable to have 
children; common antibiotics are 
in increasingly short supply, and 
the nation's hospital system often 
lacks even the most rudimentary 
supplies. 

Soviet statistics were notoriously 
incomplete and purposefully inac- 
curate. But even current levels of 
candor cannot explain such a huge 
drop in life expectancy among 
men. specialists say. 

“This is bad even by the stan- 
dards of the Third World.” said 
Yevgeny B. Mikhailov, vice presi- 
dent or the State Committee on 
Statistics. He said that to find high- 
er death rates among men one 
would have to look largely to very 
poor, agrarian countries. 

Last year, the death rate soared 
to 14.6 for every 1.000 people, an 
increase of 20 percent over the 1 992 
figure. The birth rate last year was 
only 9 2 per 1,000, a drop of 15 
percent from the previous year. 

By comparison, the figures for 
the United States last year were 
almost exactly the opposite: The 
birth rate was’] 6 and the death rate 
was 9. Life expectancy for Ameri- 
can men is 72 years. 

Unlike many Western countries, 
Russia had no baby boom in the 
1960s, and therefore the percentage 
of women who can give birth is 
comparatively small. The decline is 
also in keeping with a trend that 
has seen tile average birth rate in 
Russia fall from 7 per woman in 
1 875 to about 3 per woman just 
before World War II. 

But it is tbe changing death rate 
that has most astonished govern- 
ment officials and Western ana- 
lysts. Although the data are prelim- 
inary and largely anecdotal. Labor 
Ministry officials say the suicide 
rate has risen sharply in the last two 
years, now accounting for almost 
one-third of unnatural deaths. 


A Concession to Mexico Rebels 

In Peace Deal, Government Lets Insurgents Keep Arms 


By Tod Robberson 

Washington Past Service 

MEXICO CITY —The Mexican 
government made a landmark con- 
cession in its tentative peace pact 
with peasant rebels when it agreed 
to let the insurgents keep their 
weapons until nationwide political 
reforms are implemented to their 
satisfaction, according to political 
analysts. 

The accord, reached Thursday, 
would let the rebel Zapatista Na- 
tional liberation Army stay intact 
and remain unchallenged by the 
Mexican military at least until 
presidential elections are held in 


August Rebel leaders said they re- 
served the right to resume fighting 
if Mexico did not democratize by 
that time. 

“I can't think of any other Latin 
■ American country in history that 
has accepted such an agreement," 
said a Mexican political scientist 
Sergio Aguayo. 

"Look at H Salvador and Guate- 
mala,” he added. “The govern- 
ments told the rebels to hand in 
their weapons and negotiate sur- 
render. Here, there was no surren- 
der. They negotiated democracy 
and let the rebels keep their weap- 
ons.” 

A diplomat who has monitored 
the peace process said: “It is the 
most conciliatory gesture of the en- 


A nVFT musicuutujiiioiygcaiiucui ukcu- 

BLItAI lit How Many Buyers for $500,000 State-of-the-Art Supercar? ^ .g.' SLS i ffi fi 


Continued from Page 1 
L’Automobile. “How long can they 
hang on?” 

Mr. Artioli says his shareholders 
are still fully supportive and that 
their investment is beginning to 
pay off. He said he owned 18 per- 
cent of the company, with the rest 
held by Bugatti International. He 
said the capital of Bugatti Interna- 
tional was split among “five indus- 
trial investors, principally French,” 
and that they would "reveal them- 
selves” sometime this year. 

He hinted that the companies 
that had donated technical services 
to the effort were among the share- 
holders, but Aerospatiale, Elf, Mi- 
chetin and Snecma, the French 
state-owned maker of aircraft en- 
gines, all denied they had any equi- 
ty stakes in Bugatti. A source at Elf, 
which developed a biodegradable 
motor oD for the Bngarti engine, 
said his company turned down an 
offer to invest in the car. 

A source dose to the company 
said that Mr. Artioli, who amassed 
a fortune as a distributor for Gen- 
eral Motors, Suzuki and Ferrari, is 
likely the company’s sole share- 

Described by a Bugatti dealer as 
“dynamic, a great entrepreneur” 
ana by a former employee as “over- 
ly ambitious,” Mr. Artioli is cer- 
tainly a master at self-promotion. 
Twice a year he publishes an ele- 
gant hard-cover book devoted to 
Bugatti — past and present — 
splashed with numerous color pho- 
tos of hims elf and his wife, Renata, 
who oversees a subsidiary that mar- 
kets a line of fashion products car- 
rying the Bugatti name. 

In an interview at his sumptuous 
headquarters and facioiy complex 
near Bologna, Mr. Artioli, 61, said 
he was well aware of tbe doubts 
hovering over his venture, but dis- 
missed them as the malicious work 
of unnamed jealous competitors. 

“They’re doing everything they 
can to destroy our image,” he said. 
“Why don’t they make a better 
product instead of attacking us 
with these criminal words?” 

The 61-year-old executive, who 
oversees 247 employees, also said 
outsiders, particularly Americans, 
could not understand his company 
because they were accustomed to 
focusing on immediate payback. 

“It would be difficult to find 
something like Bugatti in the Unit- 
ed States,” he said. “Americans 
don’t invest for the Jong term.” 

In fact, Mr. Artioli claimed, the 
company is healthy and nnindebt- 
ed, though no documents were pro- 


duced to substantiate this. As a 
private company, Bugatti is not re- 
quired to publish its financial sta- 
tus. 

He projected that Bugatti’s car 
operation in 1994 would register its 
first profit, of 2 billion lire, on pro- 
jected sales of 75 billion lire. In 
1993, be said, the car business lost 7 


The Bugatti is 
billed as the fastest, 
most technically 
refined road car in 
the world — bat 
experts suggest that 
it has found 
precious few 
buyers. 


billion lire on sales of 40 billion lire. 

Through January of this year, he 
said, the company delivered 8 1 cars 
— 37 in Europe, 22 in the Far East, 
13 in the Middle East and 9 in 
South America. 

While long established competi- 
tors in the superluxury 
such as Ferrari 
have experienced a sharp 
sales over the past three years, Mr. 
Artioli said (hat Bugatti's target 
market — “the very cop of the pyra- 
mid” — is protected from the eco- 
nomic storm. 

“The people who are rich are 
very rich,” he said. “A certain 
friend of ours, a sultan, has already 


ing manager of the German 
Importers Association. No Bugatti 
registrations came up in checks 
with motor authorities or import 
organizations in Britain, Switzer- 
land and France. 

Marco Beilucci, Bugatti’s sales 
manager, said that considering the 
tax implications for such pur- 
chases, he was not "surprised” that 
European buyers had not regis- 
tered their cars locally. 

“I believe our customers will reg- 
ister their cars, but when and where 
is their problem,” Mr. Beilucci 
said. 

France Wassmer, 51, a Swiss in- 
dustrialist who bought the first Bu- 
galti, in December 1992, said he 
had driven the car with temporary 
Italian plates and is only now able 
to register the car in Switzerland. 
He said he had to wait for some 
rwhniflfll modifications to the en- 
gine in order to pass Swiss regula- 
tions. 

He said he did not know any 
other Bugatti owners. 

Mr. Artioli said the purchase of 
Lotus would advance Bugatti’s 
sales effort, particularly in the 
American market, where he hopes 


to sell 40 percent of his output 
through a sales and service network 
composed of up to 10 current U.S. 
Lotus dealers. 

Hie U.S. launching of tbe EB- 
1 10 is set for June, and Mr. Artioli 
says be will next year introduce tbe 
EB-112, a luxury sedan that was 
unveiled at the Geneva Auto Show 
last year but is still in the prototype 
stage. 

“The United States is the most 
important market in the world for 
this kind of car. even If there is a 55 
mile-per-hour <90 kilometer-per- 
bour) speed limit,” he said. “Amer- 
icans like to demonstrate that they 
have achieved a level of power.” 

But a sales strategy that draws on 
Lotus resources surprised industry 
experts, who said a half-million- 
doQar Bugatti would prove diffi- 
cult, if not impossible, to sell in a 
showroom next to a Lotus, which is 
priced at less than $70,000. 

“This is very bad news," said 
Karl E Ludvigsen, an automotive 
consultant in London. “Bugatti is 
quite another animal. It needs to be 
sold by dealers accustomed to sell- 
ing 6-figure cars. At that end of the 
market, it's so personal You have 
to know the individuals." 


way or testing the sincerity 
government.” 

The rebel leadership must sub- 
mit the accord for approval by its 
estimated 1.500 guerrillas scattered 
throughout Chiapas, Mexico's 
poorest state. The leaders made 
concessions on assistance to Chia- 
pas farmers, autonomy for indige- 
nous communities and investiga- 
tion of public officials identified by 
the rebels as corrupt. 

The government’s sincerity is by 
no means assured, the diplomat 
said. He noted that several Western 
governments had sent notes to 
President Carlos Salinas de Gortari 
urging him not to backtrack —'un- 
der pressure from his party’s rig ht 
wing — on the commitment to pro- 
posed electoral reforms, including 
tbe use of international observers. 


that could undercut one-party role 
in the country. 

After briefing Mr. Salinas and 
his cabinet on Friday, the govern- 
ment's peace negotiator. Manuel 
Camacho Solis, said that the presi- 
dent had ordered cabinet members 
and stale governors to cany oui the 
peace plan “to the letter." 

The electoral reforms are not 
spelled out in the agreement but 
will be taken up in a special legisla- 
tive session within three weeks, 
government officials said. 

The package already includes 
monitoring of the August elections 
by international observers, equal 
access to the media by all political 
parties and eliminating the long- 
dominant Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party’s control of the feder- 
al agency that oversees elections. 

Electoral reforms have been a 
key demand of tbe Zapatistas as 
well as opposition parties from 
across the political spectrum that 
contend that the governing party 
had used fraudulent tactics to stay 
in power and that its control of the 
government has fomented wide- 
spread corruption. 


2 Swiss Die in Avalanche 


Rruim 

DAVOS, Switzerland — An ava- 
lanche killed two Swiss skiers here 
over the weekend, mountain rescu- 
ers said. They were reported miss- 
ing after the avalanche Saturday, 
and rescue teams wiLh dogs found 
their bodies Sunday buried under 
2 J meters (eight feet) of snow. 


Japan Coalition Seen likely 
To Split Up for Elections 


Reuters 


TOKYO — Japan’s governing 
coalition, after almost splitting up 
over a cabinet dispute last week, 
bought three Bugattis and he just has polarized into two opposing 
ordered four more. He’s in _ love camps prepared u> go separate 


with the car." He would not identi- 
fy the customer. 

He projected sales of 220 units in 
1994 bared on orders on which cus- 
tomers must make hefty down pay- 
ments. 

“We will make 220 cars this year, 
and all of them are sold,” he said. 
“Each has a buyer.” 

But a source close to the compa- 
ny said it was “unlikely” that more 
than 40 cars were made last year, or 
that more than a dozen were deliv- 
ered to private customers. The rest, 
he said, were most likely purchased 
by dealers. The company has 18 
dealers, but it also sells direct from 
the factory. 

In Germany, where the company 
says it sold 14 cars, only one Bu- 
garri was registered in 1993, ac- 
cording to Martin Eggloff. market- 


ways at election time, its leaders 
said Sunday. 

Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa abandoned plans on 
Wednesday to reshuffle ms cabinet 
and remove a powerful coalition 
leader, driving the eight-group alli- 
ance to the brink of collapse. 

By Sunday, some of the govern- 
ment's partners were speaking 
openly of creating new political 
groups before elections, which 
could be called later this year or 


next, after a new election system 
has been established. 

“It’s impossible now for the co- 
alition partners to form one, united 
party," said Tomiichi Murayama, 
head of the Soda! Democratic Par- 
ty, the largest coalition group. 

“But we do aim to make a new 
party of our own, to fight the Liber- 
al Democratic Party, he added. 

The head of the centrist Demo- 
cratic Socialist Party, Keigo Ouchi, 
also predicted the coalition’s even- 
tual split. 

“There’s no way the eight coali- 
tion groups can form one party,” he 
said. “But two or three of us may be 
able to cooperate and fight together 
in the next election.” 


For investment information 


Read THE MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday in the IHT 





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TO OUR READERS 


IN VIENNA 


AND IN 


SALZBURG 


You can receive 
the 1HT hand delivered 
to your home or office 


0660-8155 
or fax: 06069-1 7541 3 


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ended Friday, March 4. 


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Page 9 


CAPITAL MARKETS 


*Doflar Move Would Spark 
Rally in European Bonds 


P 


By Carl Gewinz 

ARK -u ,J *«W 7hfcmr 

prices is likelv ^ J* Coin 5 s - diy rally in European bond 
at Union Bank s ^ ar P > ' insisted Malcolm Roberts 


A see a ri<u» tM*7 ~ V . „ ,<tna - BUt J,ke analysis, who 

w^.ss^jwas^.sS 

rredk^mnwjK ^ 1 ^.? 3 ?? 1 ? 1 t * eve l [°P *** an environment of shrinking 
credit supply and balance-sheet implosion,” he said 

needed, he added, is a trigger ^ ^ ^ _ 1 

tike last week's half-point cut iii r ^ 

short-term rates by the central Continental yields 

priSsWgbS 111 **“* ^ hoad should not be surging. 

ri 9*5 ®? *? salva ' Recession is at best 

non of European bond prices 

coming from developments in oyer and recovery not 
the foreign-exchange market. . 

There is considerable agreement Certain* 

that, as George Magnus of S.G. 

Warburg & Co. put it, “the dollar is the pivotal factor on whether 
European and U.S. bond markets decouple.** 

The starring point is that the upset in the dollar bond market is 
natural. The Federal Reserve Board increased short-term rates 
ouly last month by a quarter-point, or 25 basis points, and Fed 
Chairman Alan Greenspan has made clear — without hinting about 
size or timing that the trend is upward. Awaiting clarification, 
the bond market will drift lower. 

This should not be occurring in Continental Europe. Recession is 
at best over but recovery is not yet certain. A surge in long-term 
interest rates is not only unjustified by underlying economic condi- 
tions but, if m a in tai ne d, could also set back hopes for a recovery. 

At a speech in Paris last week, Mr. Magnus said that simulations 
of the impact of a sustained 100 basis point rise in long-term yields 
and no change in short-term rates could have serious c on sequence s 
in Europe. (The yield on 10-year German government bonds ended 
last week at 6.25 percent, up 72 basis points from the low set late 
last year.) 

“Up to one-half of Germany's growth could be lost in 1994 and 
1995, potentially more if the impact is compounded via a more 
hesitant Bundesbank and a blow to private-sector confidence.** he 
said. “Elsewhere in Europe, the impact looks smaller but gfflt 
substantial, with France losing a quarter point off this year's 
expected growth and nearly half a point next yean’* 

Even in Italy, Spain and Britain, where long-term rates are less 
important to growth prospects than short-term levels, “a large part 

See BONDS, Page 11 



INDEX 


International Herald Tribune 
World Stock Index, composed 
of 280 internationally investabte 
stocks from 25 countries, 
compiled by Bloomberg 
Business News. 

Weekending March 4, 
dafly dosings. 
Jan. 1992 = 100. 



World Index 

:.v ^' ■<«" ■ 



■‘ “ ‘ M y * 1 


-i-n L 


138 

137 

138 
135 
134 
133 
132 
131 
130 
129 


104 

103 

102 

101 

100 

99 

98 

97 

96 

95 


AaWPacific 

. . . .. ^ 

. ' 1 


F M T W T 


Europe 

i: ; ■ v - ; 


% . v '0 



F M T W T F 


North America | 



F M T W T 

Latin America 


* yg 


F M T W T F 



Industrial Sectors/Weekend dose 
3WM ms w % 


3M M a nsBt 
eta» cion 


Energy 11154 tff.62 -0-07 
UBHties 12337 124.09 -058 
Finance 117.30120.13 -2^6 
Services 121.49 122.60 -021 


Capital Goods 11Z1D11Z3B -025 
Raw Materials 117.85118.06 -1JC 
Consumer Goods 9935 99 SI -0-52 
Miscellaneous 12920 12854 +020 


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CURRENCY RATES 


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S5SiS!£SS£JSi — - * 


Miwh Ado About Nothing to Do 

UN Says 30% of World’s Workers Un- or Underemployed 


By Alan Friedman 

InJematiow/ Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Unemployment has become a 
global crisis, wiih about 30 percent of the 
world’s labor force, or 820 million people 
currently unemployed or underemployed, the 
International Labor Organization reported 
Sunday. 

The labor organization, a Geneva-based 
agency of the United Nations, said that prac- 
tically half of the unemployed workers in 
Western Europe had been off the employ- 
ment rolls for a year or more, putting them In 
the category of the long-term unemployed. 

Michel Hansenne, the International La- 
bor Organization’s director-general, said the 
new data “demonstrate why we call the 
employment situation a global crisis, far 
more serious than the economic problems of 
the 1980s.” He said that for the First time 
since the Great Depression of the 1930s the 


industrial countries, as well as developing 
states, are facing long-term, persistent un- 
employment. 

The UN agency said there were at least 120 
million registered unemployed around the 
world, although it noted that the real num- 
bers, including those who never registered or 
who have stopped looking for work, “are 
almost certainly higher." fa addition, about 
700 million workers are underemployed — 
engaged in a level of work or economic activi- 
ty that does not permit them to reach a 
minimum standard of living. 

The numbers make for sober reading ahead 
of the jobs conference of leaders of the Group 
of Seven industrialized countries who will be 
i next week in Detroit by President Bin 
non of the United States. The Interna- 
tional Labor Organization said job growth 
was hindered in 1993 by the general stagna- 
tion in world output, resulting in a global fan 


in average per capita income, the fourth year 
in a row this has occurred. 

The labor organization identified three sets 
of factors to account for the trend in long- 
term unemployment These are the degree 
and pace of technological change, which has 
drastically transformed the way work is 
structured; the widening economic competi- 
tion in the world economy, including the 
ability of manufacturing capacity to be trans- 
ferred; capital goods and services; and the 
current recessionary economic cycle, which 
may or may not be long lasting. 

Although the report did not offer prescrip- 
tions for battling unemployment, Mr. Han- 
senne said solutions need to be found on an 
international basis. 

“No single country has the capacity to deal 
with problems on its own,” he said. “We 
believe that the world needs an international 
strategy and an international framework.” 


Accord Augurs 
Labor Peace 
For Germany 


A Team Approach to Japanese Barriers 


By Steven Brail 

huemational Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — The European 
Union’s ambassador to Tokyo sug- 
gested that Europe and the United 
Slates could team up to identify 
import barriers in Japan and press 
the government in Tokyo to re- 
move them without delay. 

Jean-Pi erre Leng said a multilat- 
eral approach of this sort might not 
yield results as quickly as the U.S. 
strategy of threatening unilateral 
sanctions against Japan. Bnt be 
said it could be more successful 
over the long term than the Ameri- 
can approach, which runs counter 
to global trade rules and under- 
mines European interests. 

“It could be something that the 
U.S. and other t rading partners 
could do together,** Mr. Leng said. 

Mr. Leng, who is about to end 
his three-year stint in Tokyo to be- 
come the EU*s ambassador to the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade in Geneva, said be had 
“found in Japan a friendship and a 
warmth that I had not expected." 
But he admitted in an interview to 
having been “frustrated from time 
to time" over Europe's trade rela- 
tions with Japan. 

Tmtod, although the ELFs trade 
deficit with Japan feD from its 1992 
liontoS26i3 billion 


in 1993, ibe improvement was due to 
the recession in Europe, which 
slowed the demand for Japanese 
products. At the same time, Europe- 
an penetration of the Japanese mar- 
ket has been in slow deenne, a reflec- 
tion of diminished competitiveness. 
St3L. be urged restraint. 

“I don't know how long Europe 
will be patient, but this is not a 
reason to put the multilateral trad- 
ing system at risk." he said, refer- 
ring to President Bill Clinton's re- 
instatement last week of the U.S. 
trade law known as Super 301. “We 
might resolve some of our trade 
problems in the short nm. but in 
the long run we could make a mess 
of the multilateral process.** 

Mr. Leug's call for a common 
effort with the United States comes 
as Brussels and Washington have 
reportedly begun exploratory talks 
about joint actions to open the Jap- 
anese mark et. The ELTs trade chief. 
Sir Leon Brittan, has also raised the 
possibility of a trilateral effort, in- 
cluding Japan. 

Mr. Leng said such an approach, 
without threats of retaliatory sanc- 
tions. could share the U.S. goal of 
measuring progress in market ac- 
cess, yet be more palatable to To- 
kyo. 

“I think the Japanese will not be 
adamantly opposed to the world 


Sydney Notebook 


A Tax-Break Lure 
To Hook Asia HQs 

When multinational companies establish Asia-Pacific regional 
headquarters, many choose Hong Kang or Singapore partly because of 
favorable tax treatment Few opt fra Australia, with its relatively high 
33 permit corporate tax rate. But officials hope to change that by 
introducing tax breaks in lbe annual budget in May for companies that 
base their regional operations in Australia. 

The plan is part of the government's strategy to foster economic ties 
with Asia. It would also take advantage of growing uncertainty about 
Hraig King’s future as the date for the return of the British colony to 
China in 1997 draws closer. Under the Australian plan, regional 
headquarters would pay only 10 percent tax on income derived from 
the provision of management and treasury services. They would also 
get withholding tax exemptions under certain conditions. 

Such a regime would be similar to one used by Singapore to help 
lure rirggiK of multinationals to set up regional offices. 


Japanese Landlords Expected to Flee 

Australian real estate agents expect a wave of selling by Japanese 
companies in coming months as banks in Japan increase pressure cm 
indebted Japanese companies to repay loans that were used to buy 
hotels, tourist resorts and other corzunercial real estate in Australia. 

Mi chad Allen, managjng director of Colliers Jardine’s interna- 
tional hotels division, said he expected about 1 billion Australian 
dollars to flow bade to Japan from hotel sales alone. 

But as Japanese companies — the dominant buyers of commercial 
property in Australia m the late 1980’s boom — quit the market, 
investors from Singapore, Malaysia. Hong Kong. Taiwan, South 
Korea and Indonesia are buying up hotels, resorts, and office and 
apartment blocks at what they consider to be bargain prices. Local 
investors lag because Australian banks, badly burned in the property 
bust of the early 1990s, are reluctant to make real estate loans. 


Qantas’s Year Off to a Flying Start 

After a painful period of restructuring, Qanias Airways LuL, 
Australia’s main international aurlinc, is expected to report a strong 
return to profitability this month when it announces first-half results. 

Some analysis have predicted record pretax profit of about 150 
million Australian dollars ($107 million) in the six months to Dec. 31 
based hugely on revenue growth, foreign-exchange gains from a 
relatively weak Australian dollar and cheaper aviation fuel costs. 

In the year to June 30, Qantas absorbed (mo-time losses of 446.4 
milli on d ollar s, mostly because of the takeover of the domestic 
carrier Australian Airlines in September 1991 As a result, Qantas, 
which is 25 percent owned by British Airways PLG posted a net loss 
of 3772 million doOars. 

in a final step to prepare for full privatization, James Strong, 
Qantas’s new manag in g director, has almost completed a shakeup of 
the airline's senior management which has seen most of the 12 
executive general managers replaced, mainly by outsiders. 

The Aus tralian government, which owns 75 percent of the earner, 
wants to rase about 2 billion dollars to by malting a public offering in 
1994-95. To raise this amount, analysts say the airline needs to increase 
the return on shareholders* equity to about 15 percent, which implies 
an annual profit level of about 300 million dollars. 


Bottom lines lifted by Low Interest Rates 

Corpor ate A ustralia has been bringing good cheer to shareholders 
in the past few weeks of the season for reporting first-half profits. 

A survey of results of 190 companies for the six months to 
December shows an overall rise of more than 25 percent in net 
profits. Dividends were up 43 percent. 

But closer analysis suggests core profitability has barely risen, with 
earnings before interest and tax up by rally 3.6 percent. Nearly all the. 
increase in net profits came from lower bank interest charges and one- 
time cuts in 1993 in the corporate tax rate from 39 to 33 cents in the 
Australian dollar, rather than improvements in productivity. 


Michael Richardson 


looking with some indicators on 
what progress is being made in 
macroeconomic terms," he said. 

The multilateral approach also 
could be used to hasten deregula- 
tion in Japan, a process Mr. Leng 
described as part of an eventual 
“cure" to Japan’s persistent trade 
frictions. 

Europe and the United States, he 
said, could present a list of regula- 
tions with the biggest potential im- 
pact on trade and ask the Japanese 
government to abolish them on a 
“fast-trade” baas. 

The application of concerted 
pressure from outside to discard 
specific regulations is necessary, he 
said, to overcome the inherent re- 
sistance to deregulation from the 
bureaucracy. 

He added that abstract pledges 
from the Japanese government, 
such as one to cut a certain number 
of the more than 11,000 regula- 
tions, were nwaningWc shire man y 
had no impact on trade. 

“You have incredible regulations 
in Japan which are totally crazy." 
he said, “but you have some which 
migh t have an impact on trade. 

Why don’t we single these out,” 
he added, “and look together how 
progress is being made/ 

Concerning the EU’s joint effort 
with Japan to identify barriers to 


European exports to Japan, the 
ambassador said it was too early to 
make a judgment Since last year, 
bureaucrats have been studying 
regulatory, tariff and other factors, 
sudi as relative competitiveness, 
that may explain the low penetra- 
tion of a variety of European ex- 
ports to Japan. 

But the process, known as the 
Trade Assessment M echanism, is 
still in the initial phase of discover- 
ing causes. In the second phase, 
which wxD start before summer, 
Brussels expects Tokyo to take spe- 
cific measures to remove impedi- 
ments. 

■ An Understanding cm fish 

The United Stales said last week 
it had reached a preliminary under- 
standing with France to end a dis- 
pute about $100 million of annual 
U.S. fish sales, Reuters reported 
from Paris. France had imposed 
strict controls after violent protests 
by French fishermen. Washington 
had complained the controls were 
unfair and left U.S. fish to rot. 

But Prime Minister Edouard 
Balladur of France charged the 
United States an Saturday with 
abusing international trade rules 
by threatening to retaliate against 
imports of French products, in- 
cluding cheese. 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Sighs of re- 
lief, not strikes, are likely to spread 
throughout Germany's close-knit 
automotive, electronic and metal- 
working sectors Monday now that 
union and industry officials have 
readied a last-minute compromise 
to save jobs and cut costs. 

The agreement, which applies to 
3.5 million workers, restored credi- 
bility in the embattled system of 
labor-management partnership 
that once guaranteed Germany rel- 
ative sodal stability. The accord 
was expected to put pressure for a 
quick, pragmatic settlement of oth- 
er labor conflicts, including a fight 
overpublic-sector pay. 

“The wage round is all but be- 
hind us now ” Richard Read, chief 
economist at the investment bank 
UBS Phillips & Drew in Frankfurt, 
said. “It wflj be very difficult for 
other unions to ignore this dad.” 

The OeTV public-sector work- 
ers' union, however, said it still 
planned warning strikes and work 
Stoppages Monday to maintain 
momentum for an agreement The 
DAG bank-employees union said it 
would hold protest strikes on 
March Hand 15. 

The metals-sector compromise 
contract freezes companies’ labor 
costs for at least a year and provides 
business greater flexibility to cut 
production. Employees received as- 
surances of greater job security and 
no nominal decline in pay or elimi- 
nation of vacation bonuses. 

The deal follows a similar com- 
promise in the German chemicals 
sector and draws on lessons learned 
in Volkswagen AG*s institution of 
a 28.8-hour work week with a 15 
percent reduction in wages. VW, 
based in Lower Saxony, tradition- 
ally establishes an in-house con- 
tract independent of the nation- 
wide collective bargaining process. 

“All in all, the result isn't bad," 
Klaus Zwickiri. head of the power- 
ful I G Metal! metalworkers* union, 
said Saturday. 

The accord Saturday is expected 
to be accepted by union locals 
across western Germany this week. 


A spokesman for Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl said the agreement 
“beaded off an industrial conflict." 

Gerhard Schroder, premier of the 
state of Lower Saxony, where the 
strike was to have begun, welcomed 
the deal as a triumph of reason hr 
light of the blow a wide-scale strike 
would have dealt the country’s fee- 
ble economic recovery. 

Last year, for the first time in 
West German history, employers 
canceled an existing labor comma 
in order to force unions, which they 
blamed for driving wages so high 
that German industry had become 
uncompetitive, on the defensive. 

Employers sought a steep reduc- 
tion in wages, shorter holidays and 
an elimination of Christinas and 
holiday bonuses that generally 
amount to a month or more of 
wages. The metalworkers union 
sought a 5 .5-6.5 percent wage in- 
crease and better benefits. 

Instead, according to the com- 
promise that followed 14 hours of 
nonstop, closed-door negotiations 
Friday night and Saturday morn- 
ing, employers will raise workers’ 
wages 2 percent beginning in June, 
which amounts to a 1.16 percent 
annual increase. That gain was 
then effectively erased by an agree- 
ment to lower the Christmas bonus, 
leaving “zero growth" in nominal 
terms or a loss m inflation-adjusted 
terms. 

Christmas and vacation pay was 
also frozen for the next three years 
at 1994 levels. 

The most innovative aspect of the 
compromise, permits companies in 
financial straits to cut their employ- 
ees’ work week to 30 hours frran 36 
hours currently and reduce pay ac- 
cordingly over the next two years in 
exchange for a freeze on layoffs. 

Mr. Zwickd said the union had 
“lost feathers” in a losing battle for 
higher wages for its members but 
came out ahead in job security. 

Germany lost 8S0,000 jobs in 
1993 and is expected to shed another 
500,000 this year. Unemployment is 
more than 4 million and has been 
setting new, postwar records for 
months. 


THIS COULD 

BE YOUR 

TICKET TO 
WORLD CUP 







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lit- 


through your credit 
cards. Not to mention 
Sprints limited-edition 
World Cup design. 

Its a reminder 
that Sprint is an official 
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'94. As well as the events exclusive 
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telecommunications. 

So call and sign up for your WorldTraveler 
World Cup USA '94 FONCARD. Its your 
ticket to international excitement. 


Enroll for a Sprint 

FONCARDT and . - - 

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competition is coming to the v$j0p 
US And no ones mom excited 
than Sprint! Were giving away 
tickets to some of World Cup 
USA 94s hottest events. Including two tickets ; 
plus hotel and airfare , to the final game at 
the Rose Bowl A free trip to one of the play- 
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To enroll, call the number below. And 
know that no matter what happens, you 'll get 
something valuable: Sprints free World- 
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operators. And convenient billing options 

CALL COLLECT TO THE U.S. AT 402-390-9083. 

■GnnJ PriK: 2 Tsto. 2 NrfB H* 1 ™! RanHnpCoadi Airfare tolfae Ful Gameai ihc Rose Bb»l Fha Pria: 2 fid*. NrfmHoKLml jane. Teo (101 Secoi^ 

I Sami' WjtW Cgi Cmi Cdfeow fifty f50f Tbml Prisa: Sorim/Hbrid Cup Tmd jym ngt raenfling of I .<>ccg fat- f Mat. I Scrim, HbHrf Cp T-Sfart and 1 Spna/WbrM Cun I T T 

No j>on*a* mxitay w ewer All cons, us be received by March 31. IW. Warner will to etnen by taadom diming cm Apnl 30. One enHy pet tunrinU. This pranaum h abject w fo 
laws of the United Sues nl Amenta. Local lows apply. Valid ody wine legal. Void wfanr prohibited. rcgutiKd or Unffd. metoding b« «* Innaed to any claim or dafleoee ifaa this promotion visits 
any Uw. rcgubm* » « MytMmtrr « wblA lh» poMioDum b distributed w sold. Each ennara specifically mdeitfanfc Ae« luniwioni ud agrees to Aide by such itsnnioro Not 

open W cmplnwes of Sprfl or ih alMum. their families or their agencies. AM undnuils are properly of their retrain: owners, fl 1W Sprint lnteirahraal Coauminkmiom Corpora wn. 



Sprint. 


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Page 10 

MUTUAL FUNDS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. MARCH 7, 199 A 


| Grp Name wUy [GrpMome wWv IGroNcjm WwyiGroNcm* W^-|GgNgme Wklr GreNamc umaSc ‘ww Ltrtffi LaslChw Lwf Chge; FdNamc UgtQige| Fgltone lng% 

Fa Name Lust awe Fd Name Lost awe I FdNama Lost Owe Fd Name Last Oise i=d Name Lent Owe i FdName Lost awe ranjame uan-ns* i • : ! 



Close of trading Friday, Match 4 * 


Grp Name Wkfv GrpName WM» 
Fd Name Lost awe Fd Nome Last Oise 


AAL Mutual: 

Band o 10 j 03 —.0* 
CoGrp 14B1 - .03 
MunBdp 1Q-B7 -33 
SmCoSTK 1151 + 41 
AARFhtvSt: 

CapGrn 3340 + 57 
GirrieMn 15,45 —14 
Grwlncn 3X32 +34 
HQBdn 16JH— 16 
TxFBdn 11,73-35 
ABTFands 
Emergp (142 +32 
FLHI 1X42—15 


HQf-QAP 1130 
HarbSa 1532 


I 6 ”*, 1 #;™ MO TxF 11X59 -37 

| Fd Nwne Last Owe Fd Name Lost awe hjtFi in an •n 

j NYT*Ft 113? —16 

Boston Go Refcrifc DvGtht IV5Q +32 {2+?jEi I wSI 

AlocAp 1534 — 31 DWGthl 3073-37 oftTxFf 044 -33 

CcpAAp 2841 -34 DiWlt 1002-37 ORTxFt 1X50 .Tm 

ItSSAD 1240 -.10 EBtlnCt 859 -55 PATFt X71 -45 

tntA 1215 -.17 Eumt 13.57 +OT di-i-wc j 9i5 

MadlAp 11 JO -.18 Obit 8.97 — JH XT*Ft 1229 -25 

SpGTAp 14.70-34 CHWSvl 11W —.10 7vr£p\ jolj _J6 

TtBdA 1137 —.19 — — — - - - 


FLTFX 1132-33 American Fuads; 
Gwttilnp 1022 +38 AmBOIP 1136 — .W 


'in Bt^tomdRiSb; 

H'2g | * , I 4fj H2 Boip ?js — w 

S J Monomc 9 JO -37 

MunBpPXliU? — .18 SfraTBal 9B7 

P«AP \]*l (£ Funte 

PoceBP HJfl +-M BrinjnCitioja -J» 
TEHiYAp 10.95 —.14 Brin&GIBf 979 —.11 
TB^BPIO.95 -. 4 1% -M 

BmtJvwnn 2650 +49 
TxEIBp 1132 —.16 Hruc-n 10656— 246 
™? SAp T &2 b _ ' Ti BnjndflSl n 1059 —05 
- Bat 8 Bear Gp: 

™WBH Finds Gtbincnc 938 —.07 


Eumt 12.57 +.04 
Obit 8.97 — JH 

Gtwsvi ia«-.io 

FddSect 948 — .11 


HimSCI J1J9 

HKay. .£5 - « MiPEqn' 1195 +4? 
NWAZ I 1038 —.22 crfirW/H 19.ru 

WJSS*. V&-& iSESdFurts 

,!-£ “•« Em&zt 11.97 +31 

SSSf 1 EmrWUS 1043 —07 

SJHmm ££ -■% Pt-TE 10.91 -54 
ISct - ^ SmCdPlnlOOT 
**SJ. P . °|2 -53 EmoBW 1751 ~J2 
CfinJEc.' “■£ Endow* 17JK —28 
lt«“nS Enterprise Croup! 
NIRSt 11 JB +.04 CapApp 31 Jl + » 

5* r * 2040 —81 Gvsecp 1X17 — .11 
"OT —« Gwmnp 840 +.ll 
f f ST' erp ,H5 H5 Grincp 1745 -JB 
SetMu p 12J1 —42 HVBdp 1144 — 12 
MBMWHIJW +OT irrtIGro 17 74 


Utillncp 1113 *.1! 
AF LgCap nIO.Ql —316 
AHA Funis: 

Baton n 1127 -JB 
Full 9.94 — JW 
Urn 1036 —.03 
AIM Funds; 

AdiGvp 0.78 -JB 
Agrsv p 35.99 + 36 
Wa 16.01 — JB9 
Chart p ’fM 
Const! P 1050 +30 
GdSCD 9J8 —.09 
GrthBI 1142 +.16 
Grthp 1IJB5 +.14 
HYldAp 1009 -.12 
HYldBI 1O07-.FI 
Incop OH —.13 
IrrflE p 1293 -.16 


Amcpp I2B? —JO I 
AmMutl P21A0 —07 I 
BcndFdpMJB -.15 
CmUnBIP 33.19 -33 


GoMlnv np 14J1 —.18 
GovtSec np!5L22 —.12 
MvlPCP 16J4 —.42 
QuolGthplAM —.11 
SoBtP 2238 +.17 


MO TxF > 10.59 — 37 MedDeir 2033 +.14 
NJTFr 1040-32 NalGosr 9 JO +JB 
NYTxFt 1 1.09 -34 Paper r 19J5 -35 
NlMunt 10-05 —33 ProcMetrl444 +32 
NCTxFi 1035 —34 RegBrikt 17J6 —39 
Oh TxF f 1066 —35 Retail r 2536 +J 5 
ORTxFt 1050 -34 Softwrr 28.96 +40 
PATFi IQJ1 -35 Tech r 4254 + 132 
RITxFt 9.65—38 Telecom r 37.2? +JS 
SCTaFI 1029 —35 Trans r 21 J3 +.W 
TNTxFt 1034 _J4 UtUr 3449 -33 
VATxFt 10J1 —34 FMe0ty$partm 
WVTxFt 7.69 —34 AsrMunn 10.05 —30 


11 JO -.17- Bakmcenx9J5 —.11 I HTTMt 8J36 -JJ? 

1U1 —.18 i Bondnx 1047 — .14 1 3TG1I 7.26 +.01 ■ 

9JE —.09 I GavtBdru 9JB -08 I ShHntt 838 -.03 

1280 -M Growth lutlDJO +.07 SmCpEo 111.95 +33 

14 J7 +.05 1 tacfirmc 9.85—11; TclRett V4.1I 
1443— .041 inexfiax 11 j? —I? Kemper Premier; 

11.11 -.13 SpGrEqn UJ5 -.10 Drtn 635 -.05; 


Canada 1022 - 

Fixlrcp 1009 —.08 
Ocbal ISA* —13 
LtdMuP 1033 —OS 


BoITAfl 11.10 
CpGTAri H-64 -.01 
DivIlCl 10-51 —.10 
DivlTAn 10J1 - I? 


MVNUmp 934—11 EmGTA 11*J +3« 

(UatfAuP 933—11* EOlnCICt 1136 — i5 


n-Trii g fa _nj ' nuplAlp 9 03 .05 i ST BtfTr n 9,98 — JM &witvn SJBl -J5] 

gggj tfirB' ERLiSz&. SSHWS^i 
eErlt SSSp^M^SiHlSSSC-i SRsauSfiElft; ■“ 


Hlohlnc 9Jv —in 


HIMuBd 1068 -36 HMondGr 1253 -1? 
lna>5er> 236 — JQlHomstdBdnilJ —32 
1NTF 11.81 —.19 HomsMV! 14J9 +J2» 
Inst Adi 9J6 — %04 HorocMnn 20.12 —.15 
insTF 1335 —.19 HudsonCQp 1158 -JH 


GwSecp I217-.nl 
(jwttinp o« +.ii 
Grincp 1735 -JB 


CAHYm 1QJB —26 IruiEa 
CTHYnr UjW -33 KYTF 
FLMum 1031 —34 LATF 
GNMAn 9.94 — .08 MDTF 
Gavin n 1039 —.10 MassT 
HiahJn m 1235 —OS MicnTi 
InfMunf WJ0Q-.19 MNliu 
InvGrBdnIOJJ — .15 MOTF 
LWSv 986 — JQ5 NJTF 
LTGn 11.40 —49 NYlns 
NDfAum 9.90 -32 NY Taj 
Munlnr 1039 -.25 NCTF 
NJHYr 1135 -33 OtvotTl 


NYlntmlTBUl — .IBlHummermcMJl -.11 


UUlEa 1159— .14 HummrG 2214 —.09 

KYTF 1089 - HyoSD 931 -32 

LATF 1138 -.17 HvpSD2 939 -03 

MDTF 11.17 —18 IAATiGt I6JJ7 -JJ2 

MassTF it Jl —30 IA! Funds 

MicnTxF 1205 —.18 Baton on TQJ5 


1439 *JQ6 l WYId 838 -J14 
2012 — .15- ST Gl 7.23 -Jll 
1158 -JM. ShtUrt 831 —03 
J631 —.11 SmCpEq 1211 -.24 
2214 -.09 I TotRr 14.19 
931 — JB I Kent Funds; 

939 — .031 ExEalns lie? —.09 
16.07 — JB | Fxcflntrts 9.92 —.13 
1 Mj£4n 11J)1 —.04 
I0J5 - j imEalns 1337 —Sfl 
9J2 —.1 1 ; LtMaltns 935 —04 
1637 >36] MedTEfn 10.16 -.15 
10.18 —37 MIMuIns 9.91 -.08 
1447 -35; VoJEpto 10J7 — Q7 


SS!5S P USOvs no 837 —XB 

ijn— 15 Burnham p 2081 —.10 

sssr 

Govt p 1291 — 13 AmeiTFx 9J7 — J4 

* cSSvnaw^ 

SLIS B IHi “ it FxdlncnxllJB —.12 
MuWn m7 

SS5S.S » CalmoSP 1298 +JJ6 
CATFHIX 1030 — .1 9 

* cnHonttoTrasfc 

NwEcan rtOJS —16 cailnc nx 1249 — J4 
m CatUSnx 1036 -.15 
jOCPWp 23,/B +32 s^psdob 11.1s — JB 


Grincp 1735 — JB NY HY melQ J2 —38 
.WtS WVBdp 1IJ6-.12 PAHYm 10J8 —30 

o'ff * lnt1Grp V2i SWI^n 939 —US 

~® SmCo 5J6 +jii SlntGvn 9,73 — JJ7 

Hi TE Inc p 1272—33 SWUlMu n 9.91 — J59 ! 

EatySTn 3138 + 46 RduCOpn 1930 -Jll 
U-S Evemreen Funds 59WUStnMh. 

evromn 1446-J8 EumEq 30.94 -331 

Found n 1X08 —10 PncBsn 47,15 -J7[ 

20.18 +J5 GtoRen 1474 — 20 SmCO 1272 +.10 

.Hi - -25 LWMKtn 21.94 —35 TxFSI 10J0 — .05 


NY HY melQ J2 —38 ORTF HJ1 -18 
PAHYm 10J8 —30 PixGrwin IS45 — 39 


UmAAp 10.83 —.03 

AAuBP 83! —.13 TxExMDpl534 -35!'X f 3* ^ 14 ^75 
Summil 9.98 +.06 TxExVAqIM -33 337*04 

TeCTp 1291 —.14 WshMutPi736 — .IB 170—14 

TFInt 1037 — J79 AmGwttl 944 +.10 i+ii r 

Utflp 1336 +.1? AHeritBh 138 -.02 nil - or 

TO, ^ *-1® ^ SS iuo 

VsluBI BM +34 Growtn *13 _ sacJalP 3033 — .1* 

Vahip 22 . 05 +32 Income 21J9 +J19 SocBd 16J5 13 

Wei ns p 1733 +.m Triflex 1541 +JJ2 2L99 - 12 

AMF Funds: API Gr fan 1289 —J19 T^tdn lOJ? ! 

AtfNUq 9.9S — .01 Am Peffam* _ TiSj» 16Jfi -30 

IntMtgn 9.75 — .06 Bond x 9J8 — JJ9 + cot 1433 .15 

intlLiqn 1032 -JM Equity * 11J4 -JJ3 /,SGov 14J1-13 

AAfaSecn 1035 — ,11 InfSdx 10J6 -.08 rlSteS 

ARK Funds: AmUtlFd n 21.92 +38 1ST — JB 

CapGrn I0J4 +35 AmwvAAutf 731 +38 SgS 1348 -J2 

Grincan 10J8 —.02 AricXylicn 1105 —3' GwttiA 16JJ0 31 

Income 9.87 — .10 AnchCnpf 2034 -34 1534^33 

ASMFdn 1214-31 Aqtfla Funds C««rBt 53S -33 

Acosssor Funds AZTF 10J0 -.19 gvStBI 3J0— 13 

IntFxIn nxl2JXI —.12 COTF 1034 -.18 SSS, {tS -31 


^ Hi S&PMM 1239 +J» OetGrpInstl: 


|TBd 9JB —.ffi 5mCn %S6 +31 
|TU5P 32il — -S TEInep 1332 — 73 
»SU EWyStn 3U8 +46 

Tax Ex 11 Jl —31 EVerareM Fuads 
USOvtt 9J8-JB l^-JB 

1H5 ‘-S Pound n 1X08 —10 
VoUWt 20.18 +35 GtoRen 1434 -30 
SK2K. ,Hi “S LMMWn 21.94 -35 

S?22 lf JH! rtunCA n '®- 19 -M 

TCMD 10JM +31 MuniFn 1035 —07 
TCCort 1294 +.10 AAunflns n 1CL25 —34 
JCincp Retire n 1134—31 

TO-OU 1438 -J6 Tn«tn 1934 +35 
*■« VaTTmn 1543 -37 
TCSQ» t 1039 +J» ExceU/Udas 106 —33 


' 6J5 — 05 : N Amer p *.00 —.05 ■ 
725 —06 ! Modiemielvy: 

17.94 -.02 OiinCAt 10.09 -33 
838 — JH IvvEaA 183* -33 
7 23 -31. GrttiAP 1540 
831 —03 GrlnAD 9.93 -.02 
1211 - It InHAp 2734—07 
109 .MBfiSCA 1224 -39 

Mainstay Fumte . 

17 67 09 CcApt S42 -25 

M2-” Co"T* 1W0-02 
1131 -.04 Cri*fllx JM-’-Jg: 
1332 -3» . 6aldx W31 -W , 
935—04 GlcUt 11.67— JOA ■ 
10,16 -.15' Gavttx 9.41-38. 


EaWA 1136 -35 
EqlnTA 1139 —.05 

ElndTA 10.07 —03 
RatrtM 1033 —.14 
GAlTAn 1033 —16 
GvtTAn >0-22 —36 


10J3 —37 • MuHiA 1132 -.16 
1134 -.07 1 PncGrA 16.97 -.73 
896 -37, STGlAp 9.00 —04, 
11207 —.12 , UtilAfa 9J4 - 05 
IQJ6 —.13 ; CaWut 11J0 —22 1 


MHlnBtx 1053 -31 

NToxBt 11.74 —34 


GvtlCl - 1022 —06 NYTxStx 10.78 —33 
InNLjTAn 9.93 —.14 RegFBt 1636 —19 


AdiBt 945-31 
EquiBnt MOO -33 
Eatncnt 1433 -31 


"CfltfFrn 11.84 -27 j A6ATEBOB46 -.30 
Pewitvn 1172 +39 1 Secsirn BUB —.14 
GNMAn 9.62—10 STAR n 1944 —JB 
Growth n 2037 +.19 SmCoean 50.42 —.17 
HiYldn 9.19 -.11 Star Funds 
ln«m n 1739 -JM | RelV<* 1232 
AAimicn 1171 -Jl « SleltarFd 1145 
NWn 1295 +35 USGvlnc 937 


944 _ju 
.. s -?-^07 


.30 ( NwCaS U48 + U 
14 j R&ttre 831 ‘ 9 

03 j SeTech isj? 


SmCoean 50.42 —.17 Vanouord 746 +35 
tar Funds __ untteu senucss 
RetVal 1232 AllAmn 2125 +flt 

SieUarFd 1145 -JO > Euron 4L54 

USGvlnc 937 — JB GfbRscn 646 —10 

■ — »■- bu At 1 Jrzz -Im 


imEaTAnii38— V STO/tf 
MaBTA a IBS -39 Sn*0P 
MDIIp I0J6 — .13 UliBp 
MD1TA 1DJ6 —.13 CclTDl 
AAHSTAH 977 —07 USGvfi 
MuInTA 10.74 —33 ’ A«3= 
Mrjnl A p 10T6 —23 CapAD 
StGvtAp 419—32 ComTe 
SIGvtBt 419—02 DvGDC 
SIGvTAn 419—32. EuGrO 
STlnTAn 935 -35 GtGTO 
STiniBt 935 — JB . NTxDi 
5TlrriCt 935 -35, GrttiD 
SOTAn 1040—12 GllnOI 
StFTAn 996 —.10 HilncO 


FUtrStt 1203 — 01 Sasi>mrGrp1l30— .11 iSWtrstGv 9.W — 35 j GfctStin 240 


MunCAn 10.19— 38 FinHartSvt 1033 — 30 
MuniFn 10-35 — JJ7 RnHorMu 10JV —30 
Martins n 1CL2S — 34 Brst Amer Fds C 
Retire n 1134—31 AstAHln 1034 -.03 
Tfl«tn 19JM +J1S Balance! nlOTS —31 
VoTTmn 1543 —37 Ealdxln 1075 —03 


TxAdHY 830—13 IDEX Group: 

TXTF 1138—14 K»x 19.17 +J» 

USGov Sc *6.91 —10 TGtobAD 1X76 —09 
utilities X 936 —06 2GrowAp1833 +JB 
VATF 1143 -.18 2TaxEx 1IJ4 -39 
Franklin Msd Tr. . ZtocWA p 1037 -38 


Baton un 1075 -I inrEalns 1332 -30. 6rtdx lf3l , MKTAn9^-w 

AflNlltt 1116—17 BandPfl 942 -.1 1 ; LtMallns 935 -04 GlcUl H A7 -36 ■ JMnTA 10.74 

MOTF 11.73 -30 EmpGrpnlLJ? -36 MedTEto 1016 -.15 1 <^1* ..ML-S in “m 

NJTF 1143 -.19 Govtpn 10.18-37 WUMirtns 9.91—08, NlR^otalip.72— 09 SIGvJA p A19 -to 

NYlns 1139-35 Grtnco 1447 -35 VolEpki 1047 - O' TxFBW ?-W -30 . SGvJB ta.W—O- 

NYTox 11.92 -31 ImFdn 1196 — 09 [tCeyStoae: . TorRtt* 15.76 +35 SgvTAn 419 -32 

NCTF 1171-30 Midcap n 1431 -.14 1 Cusfilt 1542-11. Veil J570 S^nTA" Mg— ® 

OtvotTF 1120—20 ReoMinp2149 +J»I CusB2t 1457-.il MamwereFiU^: STlfaBt 9^— to 

ORTF 1131—18 Resrvpn 1031 -321 CuSB4t S3 4 — JM Cao^Pri 25^ -34 FnrtC I 935 -to 

PncGfWtn IS45 —39 value n 1235 —07 ■ CUSKII 974-331 SpEqn 3937 -.06 SOTAft 10^ —IZ 

PATF 1042 —14 IBM Mutual Funds CusMt 843 -35 incEan ^33 —13 SFTAn 9J6 — 10 

PrtmRt 6.35 —02 LoraoCo nl5J12 —34 1 CusSIf 2257 +.01 ShortGv n 19.18 —IS ! “II 

PuerTF 1144—17 MurtBd 10.11—15 CUS531 940 -.02; lntWsn lW -« Vah*!ApV3S3 

SI Gov 1040 -36 5moUConl834 +.13 CusS4t 849 -.16 SI°ond S6 — T3 VrtueTA 1195 +^ 

SmCopGr 1340 +.19 US Treas nUL55 — JB7 will BJH — .07 1 Bwjdn -J-92 — » ™ TAn 1044 — .13 

TAGov 1043—12 UtiBty 1143 +33 KPMt 24J8 -34 j imtEqn 35J9 -31 VAl Ap 1164 -.13 

■ JEXGrtup: ! TxETrl 1076 -72 'Manner Funds: Natomrteras 

laex 19.17 +j»; ToxFrt 7J4—16. Fxdlnc 9.94 —37 . tB Bert 956— .12 

2Gk3bAD 1X76 — 09 KGVPStane America: ; NY TF >1-17 -35 . JMnFd 16.12 

JGrowA 01X33 - 36 Aulncfp 945 —19! 5TF*Jnc 931 —M Nt©*mj M36 +36 

ZTaxEx I1J4-39I CAPIF 941 —.01 TR Ea . 1274 —02 TxFret ~3A 

2lncPlAp 1047 — JB I CPI2BI 933 — 02 I Mark Twun Fds ( USGvIn r 932 -JI7 


STGvtBo 246 -.01 ; FISfrAf 1X10 — 02 'SojCMWOBrMi 5teto WVupl044 —12 

SmO0PBtl059 FWCPRh 1125 -JE' Capn 20.18 *J1S«eBrtdCrt 

wrap 930 + 33 GNMAtmi4A4 — 12: lnw«n IXS5 +35 1 Com St 773—39 
CcTTDp 11.15—251 SAstB 1.90 -31 , 3043 +-JH 

USGvfit 975 — 09 GtoWBt 1280 — J3 ! Sdxrfff V ^35 _ Pnwess 1+38 +^ 

AHDb 1653— 36. GWtBf 14.17 —31 Schfudlnph2211 —42 TaxEx 1033—12 

CopAO 1337 -.19 GISGAnf 1879 —44 i Schrader 831 +36 USGovp ill —05 

ComTecp 948 — JM I GtoRsrU 1220 -.15 SdnwB FUmta 5tFam«s: 

DvGOP 2048— .10 ■ ©vPIBttn 9JO — 09 j CASln 917 —39 Baton n 3135 —31 
EuGrO ?J1 -31 GvtScfpn 930—07 CATFn 1047 -36 Gwfhri H45 —30 

»M3 1135—08 GrthBI 14.99 -JB 1 GavSI 10.15 — .05 Interim 1030 —35 

MTmDb 1175—34.'. GtOpBt 1231 -.11 : intllrtx 1037 — 0B 1 __Mumn .839 —09 


Sfart»tlMupI044 —12 Growth n X02 +37 
Stale Band GriR tocon lit* + no 

Cam St 773 —39 ReaEstRl039-n 
Diversitd 9.19 -JB SaTiGvtn 9.98 — m 
Prusreu 1208 +.02 U5TxFrnxI179— 34 
Tax Ex 1033 —12 WridGMnl673 -3* 
USGovp ill — 05 VafFuran 943 + 3P 
5tFarmFds: Value Line Fit 

Baton n 3135—21 AdjGun 9,92 -ja 


NTxDP 1175 —24 '• OOPBI ' 1241 -.11 
GfltC 2040 -.04 | HiYIcBttn 8.64 —09 


CATFn 1047 —26 Gwthn 2245—30 
GavSI 10.15 —.05 f Interim 10J0 -35 
intllndx 1037— 0B 1 Munin BJ9 — 09 
NtfTFBn 10.15 — 30 StStreet RefihE 
1000 r 1235—01 CATFC 833-16 


VAI TAn 1064 —.13 STGvtOP 244 —01 
VAJJAp 1044 -.13 SmCapO 10 JB -31 
latianwideFds USGOa 974 -.09 

tBB art 956—12. UtlOp 
NatnFd 16.12 _ PonGMjn 11.07 — J09 

NtGwttl 1136 +36 POOP Stt 1X17—15 
TxFret 1037— 34 Ramson Ft 


GlInDI 1075—37 IntGllf 836—111 lQ OOr 1235—01 CATFC 8JB — 16 

®!Edp 833 —37 ; MGHBf 837-11 SlTFBdP 9.99 -.10 CertWA 10.11 +.15 

InvGD 1077 —12 : lnVerBRnl236 — 36 SrrrCptdx 1031 +36 CdptiD 1036 +.15 

mnDmiut-jM 1 MumB 11S -.03 'scatwai 1478-31 Capita® 1035 +.15 

MHIDPR laa-Si PacGriJ 1677 -73 Scudder Funds ExchFdnm94-4B 


Brtancednl2tB— 05 Energy* 1135 —.12 

IOJB-31 MunArz 1 1139 —30 ! CdTxr 1038—21 GvtlncA 1248-38 
974 -39' MuR-A 1030 -31 l CapGtn »J7 +.17 GvtlfiB 1246—08 

9^ +m MuGat 1145 -31 . Develop n 34 J7 +J9 GttiCn 844 +43 

11 07 —39 MunHYr 11 JB —16 1 EmAAkinclliS —38 IfwTrfi 848 —33 

1X17—15- Mulrts* 11.01 —70 ! GNMAn 14.48—19 KivTrAp 271—33 

Munin! 1131 —70 1 Gtohln 2446 — J? InvTrC 873—03 

17JM +J2-- MuMdt 10.76 —71 1 GISmCO 1648-17 NYTFAp 8.11 —.14 

1038 -37' MunMAt 1143 -30! GcHdn 1118—05 _ NY TF C 0.12 —14 
1042 —,16 | MuMnt 1137—181 Grvrfncn 1743 +32 Steadman Funds 
10.18 — JH. MunMIt 12.01 -30 l Income n 1344 —16 1 Amlndn 147 +32 
1Z19— as- MuniMoariOL92— .13; Ifiwmatl n44JM — C i ASSOC n M 
1X10 +17 MuNC I 11J7— inttSdn 1334—16 Invest n 138 +.02 
,Sh£ , flrtunNJI 11.13 —.17 1 LatAmrr 2247 — 33 Oceangn 2J7 +.10 
974 —06 MuNY» 1106—33! MATxfi 1346 — 39 iSMBnftoeFds: 


I OOMert Gmum 


TxExMDp 1X34-351 

TxExVA pl 180 —33 1 


— ,B GtobEa 17.93—16 
mGWTtJ 9M ♦.ID i rtre* 1714 —.16 

MSCAl 1M1 -38 

Aflumm 1030 —08 

SS?2 2^ .49 g** ri? 

JS41 +32 i»J9 -12 

f l £ f fo | lj+ J9 -Jg TxFLtdn 1070 

IT! TOWnU „ TxPl TW l&ifi ___2Q 

Bond* 948 -J» iS —15 

!'■« USGov 1441-13 


S&PMM 1237 +J» DeJGfPlnslfc ExtovKp 736 —09 

MrrtG™*, _ Cecil }H? “■E FAMVuln2X35 +JH 
Ariel 30.14 —35 Detwrl 1841 —37 pRLSertes 
Ariel Ap 2237 +.06 Dtcpt 2632 +36 bKKpI 1&84 — JJ7 

GtobEa 17.93 -.16 Dtert , 7.06 -M Si 1344 7 JO 

Inoo 17.14—16 TsyRsI 946 — JH HJGrBdt 1039 —03 

MSCAl 1031 -38 DetawnreGnniR HiYBdt 1049—12 

Munirn 1030 —08 Trend p 14.14 +J4 Mwigdt 1X10 +j03 

SoctolP 3033 —14 VufcJep 2078—47 FFBLilXKWfc 
SocBd 1655 -.13 DbKWU 2tg +34 GopAw 1147+ 05 

SocEa 2159 —.12 Deem 1442 —.07 Pvdln 1032 — m 

TxFLtdn 1070 - DecJrHp 1185-JM 1030 -46 

TxFLng 1645 —30 DetawB 1840—08 SetVotoepllJS +J» 

TxF VT 1633—15 MtEap 1233 . FFB Eq 1068 +47 

USGov 1441—13 Oeichp 7.06 —08 FFBNJ 107B — 30 

OomWdgeFds: USGovtp 8_53 -.08 STW J F»o*r 

CoaGrA 1X11 — JB Treas P 946 — -06 biffl-toa 749 — J)4i 

GvtnA 1148—12 TxUSp 1230 —16 usaSt 9J6 I 

GwrhA 1600 —01 TxliiSD 1131 —16 WWHedg 940 — JB 

MuIncA 1574 —33 TxFrRPP X47 -.13 WWFxdto974 — OS 


FxdlncJ n 1049 —07 Fran Win Tempt 
Govern n 931 —43 Gtobl 1345 -.05 

Ultlndn 9.90 — JM 1 Hod 1277 — 35 

Ltdlnd n 9.97 —.01 l Hilnc 11.11 -33 

MtBSecI n 1X18 —03 Fremoal Funds 
MunSdl n 1042 — .13 Global n 1X19 —.19 
ReflEq|nl24B . Growth (1 11.17 +J15 
SoecEql nl63I —.04 CAInt 1071—13 
Stockln 1641 +47 FundTmst: „ 

First Amer Funds Aggres fa 1i*3 —.01 
AstAII o 1044 — 04 Groin fa li77 —.07 


Bdanp 10.78 —Jll 
Equity p 163! — 04 
Eqldx p 1075 — JD 


Gwttlfa I4JJ2 —M 
incofox iai4— 11 
MwJTR Ip1135 -JM 


CapGrBt 1X08 —JO Dimensional Fete 
GvInBI 1340—131 USLT9 1X94 — JB 


AocMartg 1204 — JB hi TF 1145—16 Sffifi*, 'la — U 
ShtlrtiFx xl213 — .09 KYTF 1047 —15 I _j4 

AcomJri 1637 -35 NrunslTF 979 -33 c ^mSSx „ hm -m ' 
AanFd 1160—16 OR TF 1047 -.IS cSS,M^roc9« +42 
AdsnCap 2142 +42 AqofaasFund: oSSmSlHl -16 

AdvCBrtp 1040 -JM Batancen 9.93 -JJ4 r^pWEGnixia +49 

££21"^ - u 2S-12 3 ppwu« Vj»+S 

-.18 ArtiniSds "• ,0 CrtStortGrome .. 
Gwttinp 1734 —47 Bal 10.04 —.01 


US Short 936 _ MtgSec P 10.18 — 03 

WWHedg 940 —48 MunBdp 1042 —.13 
WW Fvcfin 9.74 —08 RegEu P 1248 
FMB Funds: Stock P 1641 +47 

DivECp 1144 _ FslBoslG 941 -.13 

DfvEI 7144 _ FsfEaglnr 1X49 +.03 

MGCP 1036 — JH FrSIF+E* 1036 —.01 

MG I 1036 — JH FtHwMu 1039 —17 

MiTFp 10LA5 — .12 First hnestW5; 

MjTFI 1045—12 BIChip p 1541 -JM 


HYBdp 9.49 —07 EmGrth 11.95-3? 
Inconp 1190 —05 GavCorp 1031 —.07 
MuBdNat 948 —34 Grolnc 13 JM +JM 
Sod np 2139 + 32 MoTF 1134 -32 
Aetna Funds: USGov 1073 —07 

Aetna n 1030 —.03 Armstna n 830 + 32 
Bondnx 10.15—10 AttantoGrpHA3 —.02 
GrwinCO U36 .. Altos Fonts 

InWGrn 11.18—35 CaMuni 11.10—32 
Ataer Funds CAlns 10.14 —10 

Growth I 2170 + 39 GvtSec 1033 —11 
IncGrr 1274 +.01 Grolnc 1431 +38 
WtaJCpGr t!330 + 33 NoMuni II. 15 —20 


■ , FundSW IL00 +30 WGv 1 1 1.93 —.93 

1?'22 — -SJ Gvttnc 479 -Jll lntlHBAA 1135 —06 

-« MedRS 19.10 - LCaplnt IZ1B -.12 

’“1 -■?' NZJand 1202 -31 PacRim 1740 -46 

to Hjapai 7J0 +.14 USLflVal 1045 +JB 

I).-" US Trend 1340 +JW USSmVui 1170 

’nan 7 m CarOnal PomOr: DodgeACbx: 

tK AggGth 1040 —02 Baton n 4737 — JOB 
H43 — JH Balanced xltt.^0 +.0f utcomen 117 6 —sv 
mn -w Fundx 1296 -J07 StocKn M.94 +J05 
in i! m GovtOttlig 140 -JH DomSOdal 1242 —06 
ini? COrilCa 1X13 -JB Dramau Funds 
iSo, ?J3 ComegOHTE 9.75 — .12 Cantm 1172 -72 
Ifti w CnKBiA 1X41 —31 HiRtn 1X84 —.16 
11.15 —20 CnKBIB 1X38 —31 SmCpValnlUl— .11 


USSml 870 +.02 rvVF I 1144 
US6-10I, UAH +42 1036 -Ob 

JWtonn Jfl9 < MG I 1036 — JH 
25-™ — ■ MiTFp JH4S -.12 
Cartn _ 14X3 —13 MiTF I 1045 —12 
DFARIEslt13» —.09 h*A Funds 
Rwlfl J0146 —to CdPit 20.14 +43 
G*Bd 1^ -75 Newtnc 1057 . 

Govt" J?3.W —47 parmnt 1166 +J17 
WGV .. "I-H --5 Peren 2205 -.06 
lntHBM 1135 —06 Ftrirmfn 34JM +45 
LC®W W* — 1* Fasctonon 1745 —417 
PocRnn 1740 —46 FedendedFiireis: 
USLflVal 1045 +JW ArmSSon 9.86 — JB 


Fxdfnc p 1049 —.0* Fundamental Funds: 
GovBd p 931 —.03 CAMun np X77 — 32 
Inline P 9.«0— .04 NYMunnpl.12 —03 
Ltdinc 9.97—31 USGovn 1.88 —JO 
MtgSec p 10.18 — 03 GAM Funds: 

MunBdp 1042 -.13 Global 151.06 — 240 
RegEqp 1248 . mtl 19X73-334 

Stock p 1641 +47 PacBas 18X18—5.95 
FslBoslG 941 -.13 GEEHunSAS: 
FStEaglnr 1X49 +.03 DiversfdnW.W — JB 


raakfin M3d T r BncPIAp 1047 -JB | CPI2B1 943 -.02 i KWrk Twwn Fds . ( U SGvln r _99! - JP . &^5 17^+^ 

CorpQualQ835 — ffl Mex3 1X8S +.«l EinA 1146 -.03 ! W -£6 o« “u 

InvGTOdepSJM —07 ZFtxWA p 9 J7 — 1 1 ' FhtA 1Q4? -32. FttUncm 0.»1 — 10 , £MT EalnlilO -03 ^ LATF 042 —16 

RiSDivpr 14B1 —18 IDS Group: I FOAA 11J» — JOI fttortlJ-W .. %3A — ^ ETGv 10.18 -^4 

hnddin Tempt BluCpu 6J7 — J» I GKJA 1948 +.08 | MarfceJWOWiFds: t'ESS n IH? “■« «™7u 

GkST 1X85 —05 Bond o 534 —06 GvSA 9.90 —.11 1 Eauity 1OJ00 — ( U dftftrt n 1031 — JB V alGr» 1X19 .17 

CATEu X34~J» HrEGA 24.80 Flxtoc 9^ —03 1 Martjatn JIB 

DEI p 754 — JM 1 HrtGrA 2343 +36 1 IntFxIn 953 -57; MuST 10^—10. Bon^d 9.74—06 

Dlscpvp 1238 + 36 IrrxW 932 -JM I VAMuftJ 1003 — 15 1 20^8 -57 &W«vA 1647 +.16 

EquitPlp 1130 -41 Omesa 1731 - .09 | Marouis Ftmdfc ■ SeBetol n 22JM —20 . H^A 1486 +.W 

Extrinp 444 — JM 1 PtxA 11J8 — 34, GviSecA ^ — 55 ! Wfaffld n 9^ — g IntGav A 9J7 

Fwflncp 4.96 — JQ7 1 StcA ZM —07 ! GlhlnA 9.90 — JM , NewAIter 30i5 —53 . Irt^sA 11S8 — J 4 

GlabBd P X96 —OB 1 TxF A 9 93 JO 1 VOlEoA p 953 — 31 NewCnt to 1232 — 37 1 LMMalA 055 — 

Gto&S" X76 —37 1 Wri« A 938 -iS j MaretaH Fu«te .NewUSA p M27I -33 MINtoA 

Growth p 1112 -30| Ft»B 1 IOA5 —23 1 Bain 1039 + 34 ‘NidiQkwGrPUPe, pmCD A 7196 +33 

HiYdTEp 441 -38- FOABf 1130 —01 j Ealnc 977 -35 1 g-W * 03 U SGvtA 9J6 

InsrTEp XS5— 121 GtOpBt 1944 -.07 Gvflncn 942 —36 1 Nchlln +.14 Pmfcsta«C9kB 

Irmp 8636— .13* GvSBI 9 89— U. IrtBdn 972 —36, NiCWncn 343 —33 Baton Cn 1146 -JM 

MgdRp 1132 — JO I IrrtdBf 932 — 35 ! IVUdCaon 1020 -.17 Wi Ldn 1871— 10 BondCn 973 —36 

MKip s.40 IT PTvFBt 1136—33 ST Iren 932 —31 tfidiota* Applegate: Equity Cnl 646 +.17 

Michp 542 —.10 ! StcBt 839 — .07 • Stock n 1047 + fft \ BaIGthB 1414 -.11 Gvttnc C 976 - 

MNTEP 534 — JBi 7XFBI 9.93 —30 VSEdn 1015 -371 CareGthA 1432 +.13; HYEqCnl486 + M 


1734 +32 
1038 — JW 


Asgrin n 7JW no 

ConvFdn 1336 -37 
Fundn 1836 +2* 
Income n 640 .37 
LevGT 2X29 -JB 
NY TE n 1036 _£ 
Sod 53 n 1740 +.17 
TaxExn HJ73— 32 
USGvtn 1145—11 
vonEdc 

AsiaDynBBJi —43 
AskiA p 1X40 —4! 
GaktResp 633 —is 
Fnitlnv 1449 —07 
Wridbic px 844 —14 
WrtdTmpU79 —33 


rSKTE A 10JR — 3X1 Gtohot n 1636 —.14 

IHwMu 1059 —17 Income n 1J41 —38 

irstkivntors: S4S Lrtonl 136 —.08 

BIChip p 1541 —34 S&SPMn36Jl — 32 . 

Gtobl p 612 —.09 Tax Ex 1176 —32 SMncf 641 —38 ARMC 

Govt p It 43 —.10 Trusts n 3X43 —.18 SlrSTl 130 —.01 AstAK 

Grolnc D 647 _ GE Funds: StrWGt 544 — 33 1 EmMk 

HWiYdp 530 —35 GtobalC 19.10—15 TEBntlP 3.97— 39 1 EmMk 

Income p 4.15 —35 LncameC nl134 — JB Utillncp 645 - 32 ] GlbEal 

InvGrdp 1034 —.10 StrogC 1X75 —.10 IStFundK 1 Gtofem 

UfeBCo till —31 USEaDn 1XI8 —31 Muni pm 1Q41 —30 I GtoEaJ 

LrteHYn 1135 —.14 GE USE 1X17—31 NoAmPx 932 —.16 , GlbFxJ 

USAnp 1138—05 USEqA 1X16—31 Trstox 9J9 — .12 ■ GtbFto 

MATFp 1133—21 GtTlUVSJ: IndOnuGT 1X10 -35 [ GvtAt 

MiTFp 1X31—35 EnSocn 21.99 +43 Independence Cap: IntFlA 

NJTFp 1193 —34 TFNatln 1038 — 35 QppartP 1146 -JM KFEtx 

NYTxFr p 1445 — 32 TkFrVAnlIJa — 33 SlidGvlP 936 —.04 ( MunlB 

PATFp 1243 —361 GTGtotrt: TRBdP 9.W —18 • SmCm 


EquitPlp 1130 —31 Omesa 1741 -.09 
Extrinp 444 — JM 1 PtxA 1148— JU 

Fedlncp iM -37 , StcA ZM -07 

Globed □ 196 —0B ) TxFA 9.93—30 

GtoGrp X76 —37 1 WrKJSA 940 — JK 

Growth p 1X12 - 30 | FtxB 1 1045—23. 

HiYdTEp 441 — JB • FOABf llj® - 01 ; 
InsrTEP 545 — .12 1 GtOpBt 1944 -.07 
Iflhp 1046—13 GvSBt 9.89 — ill ■ 

MgdRP 1142— JE lunfflt 932 — 35: 

Mess P 5.40 —11 I PTvFBt 1146—33 

Midi p 542 —10 SICBI 839 —.07 

MNTEP 544 —M | TxFB 1 9.93—30 

Mutlp 1239 — 39 GtOpCt 1940-38 

NYTEp 542 —09 TxFCt 9.93—41 

NewOP 1441 +35 1 FtxCt 1046 —23 

Ortop X4J — 39 FOACI 1131 —31 

PrecAWu X50 -41 GvSCt 9.90—H 

PTOgresp X84 +.02 Fmt/CI 932—45 

SetedP 942 — 10 1 PTxFCt 1147—24 

Stock p 1946 +33 StcCt 838 — .07 

StrAgul 1X49 +32 k'lARF 045—31 

StrEqt 944 —JO KiSWer Groups 
Strtnct til —38 ARM GvA 1232 —31 


239 -39 GIOpC t 1940 -JB, Mothers n 1X00—18; COTGnh61il6 -.13 

542 —091 TxFCt 993 —41 Mnxus Funds: , CoreGrlWJlWl -.13 . 

441 +35 1 FlxCf 1046 —33. Eflui»vfpnl343 — .10 . EmoGrA 14; 4 -.11 

543 —39 | FOACI 1131 — 31 1 Income I 1073 -.06' EmgGrB 13.12 -.11 

840 -41 GvSCt 9.90— 11! Prism ten 9.92 — 05 EnwGrQu1 1246 -.11 
X84 +.D? FmcfCI 93? —45 ; MenfGltl IA06 -32; tortrA J4.« 

942 —.10 1 PTxFCt 1147 —24 .MjentSTrn 1247 -.141 IncGrB 15JB +38 

946 + 33 I StcCt 838 —07 AlergerFd PKL06 +.05 1 VTVTGrS 1X10 -.07, 

549 +32 k'lARF 945 — 31 i/.leritfann 25.74 -.11' WWgr 15.18 +37, 


Equftv A 1647 +.16 1 MunOfl r 11.97—10 MedTFn 1X99—14 
H1E0 A 1446 +.03| MuPOl- 10.70 — IS 1 MMB X60 — IB 
UHGavA 037— JB; NJMunf 1541 —40 NYTxn 1071—31 
(nflDisA 115B-36 Struct fo 1148-07 OHTxn 1104 -Jl 
LMMatA 945— JM StTUdBt 1148—36. PA To* n 1341 —35 
MIMuA 1074—10 US Gvt fin 1031 —10 I FacOpps nl64fl— 45 
SmCo A 29.96 +43 UtilBR 943 +.05! QualGrn 15.96 

USGvIA 976 _ ProdertWtasa: I ST Bond n 1 1 43 —.08 

Purfcstaae C 9uc . AdBoln 11.13 +31 I STGtoln 1143—03 

Baton Cn 1146 -JM ! Bain 1133 — JJ2 i TxFHYn 12.04 —37 

BondCn 973 — 36- GtnSIKn 1240 +JH; Value n 1195 — 33 

Equity cm 648 +.in Income tn 9.90 —38 1 2«2>JW>n 1244 — 12 

GvttncC 976 -1 InttSlkn 1443 — .10 SeafintIRA: 

HYlEqCn1446 +J» SfcldXn 11.14—32 Asset Ax 1346—08 
IntGvTCn 9.97 —JJSlFBtnam Funds: ! BiCh 1771 

trfflCn 1344—35 . AmGcw D 832—36, Bardx 10.93 —.10 
LUMtC 945— JM I ArtAP 1040 —32 1 Security Funds: 
MIMnC 1074—10, AsicAP 1434— 431 BondP 740 —11 

MuBdC 1046— .10 1 BIGvAP 445 —.82 ' Eauilv 540 +JB 


CapGtn 2077 +.17 GvtinB 1246—06 AsiaAp 1340 -42 
Develop n 3447 +49 GlhCn 846 +JU GakWesp 633 —.is 
EmMkJncMJSa -JB InvTtfi 9.68 —.03 tofflnv 1449 —07 
GNMAn 1468 -.10 KivTrAp 8.71—03 WridlncpxB44 — 14 
Gtohln 2446 —47 InvTrC 873 —03 WrfdTmpl4.79 — jn 

GtsmCa 1X48—17 NYTFAp XU — .14 VonKampen Men 
GaWn 1118—05 NYTFC 8.12—14 CA TFA p 1740 _ji 
G rvrfncn 1743 + 32 St e adman Funds GwttiA d 1946 +ju 
incomen 1344 —li I Amlndn 147 +JH HRYldA p 1047 +-jjb 

Inwmafl n44JM — C Assoc n 46 _ in TFA o 1X95 —M 

InttSdn 1334 —.16 invest r 148 +.02 AAunlnA p 1548 — 47 

LatAmrr 2247 —43 Ocetngn 249 +.10 MumcSt 1546 —47 

MATxft 1346 -49 SHw Sne Fd® PA TFA o 17 45 -3i 

MedTFn 1X99— .14 CauOppnSZJM +46 PATFB 1744 —37 
MMB X69 —IB Gvttnc n 9.95 —38 SlOAp 87? —35 

NYTxn 1071-41 HvMunn 1142 -.19 STGBt 872 — JU 
OHTxn 13JM — 31 income n 038—39 HsInAp 1346 —.15 

PA Tax ft 1X41 —45 kitmBdn 830 — JB StBlnBI 1345—16 

FocOppsn 16.53 — 45 littMunn 1142 — .17 TxFHBI 14.95-43 
QualGrn 15.96 _ LUMlnn 934—03 TxFrHiA olX96 —43 

ST Bond n 1133 — JB MgdMun 898—16 USGvBt 1X16—M 
STGWn 1143 —03 PrinwEqnl442— .19 U5 GvA p 1X17 —is 
TxFHYn 12.04 —47 Spedn 2347 —.14 UtUUyAp 14JB +jp 

Value n 12.95 —33 Slock n 24.15—0? Uti®l 1434 +37 

ZerSMOn 1234 —12 TaHRarn 2X82 —03 Van* ExdkmBW 


1530 +38 PCTnMn 1730 —31 


RRATn^idL , ' IS ~ M CrtCBIB 1548 -21 SmCpVatnlUl— .11 
■“ 00 C&YumGP 040 -JM DrevtUS 

A ?S!2L < ? P *«1 m ISSK. entrvShrn 2129 —23 A Band nxl439 -43 

SSfS OiCapBC 1343 +32 Aorecnp 1465 -.16 

a2^n+ IJoi Tn ~S ChesGrtti T465 +41 Asset All n 1169 -JM 

Si HP 936 - M CHestnt 143.95 — 47 Bdncd 1349 —04 

“m B nu£w? 9 not «, QkcMilwnl43L80 — 37 CafTxn 1499—27 

in£? - «7 ChubbGrtn 1X90 - Crtlidn 1341 -43 

^ ’9-?I —to --?5 OmbbTR 1535 -33 CTMn 1247—17 

f ? o|SS{S 1 p „ , 52 afapern 49J5 -75 Dreyfus 1343 —04 

LS’odC a 1412—47 BFlraiDun 936 — ^ Qjlqoigl Funds EdBlnd 1235 +49 

SSSl^L S-H Ti? ii? T-S totffllp W-52 — 17 FLMn 1348 -18 


GtoSAp Ills +.01 BJBIEqAp 1341 — 40 
GovtAp 847 — 09 BNYHtamatoa: 

Gov® p 847 —09 Ealnc nx 1148 +JB 
GovtC p 847 —09 IntGavt 931 —08 
Grolnc p 241 _ NY TE n T0.1D —09 

G+flhC 2147 + 35 Babion Group: 
GivthFp 2533 +36 BandLn 1JB —31 
GwthBt 7146 + 35 Bond S n 1039 —37 


CrtTE A 748 —.14 
ConTEA 739 —15 
FedSec 1033 —.15 
FLTEA 7M8 — 18 


FkglSn 1055 —05 NJTFp 1193—24 
FSTilsn X97—32 NYTxFr p 1465 —42 
FGROn 2341 —JP PATFp 1253—46 
FHYTn 045 —13 5pecBd 1238 -.14 
FITISn 1046—10 SoStP 1069 +44 
FIT SS p 1044 —10 TaxExpt p 10.17 —78 
F statlS n 10M3—33 TotRetp 1233 — JD 
FsiBhtSS plC.43 —03 UtllUlOOP X«5 +36 
FST n 2573 —08 VA TF p 1249 —44 
FST1 SS p 097 —32 FlrsfMut 1037 + 39 
GnrnalSn!144 — 3B First Omrtia: 

GnmaSp 1144 —38 Equity n 1048 —.04 
FigtSSp 1055 —JB FxcBnc n 10.13 — JB 
IMTIS 1046—12 SIFxInn 9.94-33 
MaxCao 1136 —02 FPDvAstp 1276 —13 
MirtcasnlZIT +37 FPMuBdPl2JM —14 
SutTerm 1044 -JM First Priority; 

US Govt n 10.18 —.10 Eauity TrnlOJV +36 
SBF A roc 1X50 —18 FxtBncTr 1015 —.10 


AstADB t 1146 —36 AcfiP. 
EmMktA 1131 -44 • AZM 
EmMMB 11.60 — 44 | SOLA 


trirmtn 2404 +35 InvGrdp 1034 —.10 StrogC 

ascicznn 1735 —37 UfeBCo 1411 —41 USEaDr 

Mended Funds: LHeHYn 1135—14 GEUSE 

ArmSSon 9.86 —32 USAnp 1138 —05 USEqA 
Arm In 9.86 —32 MATFp 1133—41 GrTUlVSb 
ExChFdn 7244 —4 MiTFp 1241—45 EnSocn 


LncameC ntl 34 —38 Utillncp X65 -32 GtoEaB n 1 642 — 12 
StrogC 1X75 —T9 151 Funds; 1 GtoEoCn 1646 —.12 

USEaO n 1X18 — 31 Muni pro 1031 —40 | GtbEaA 1643 —12 
GEUSE 1X17—31 NoAmPx 032— .16, GtoFxB 1239—15 
USEqA 1X16—31 Trstox 9J0 — .12! GtoFxA 12.10—15 
irTtoVSb IndOnuGT 1X10-35; GvtAt 1449 —16 

EnSocn 21.99 +43 Independence Cap: IntFlA 12JJ6 — 38 

TFNaNn miss —15 OooartP 1146 -JM KPEtx 3445—04 
TkFrVA rill 40 —43 SlrrtGvlP 936 —.04 ( MunIBdA 1140 —27 ' 
>T Gtobak TRBdp 9.94—18' SmCOPA 1237 -44 

Amerp 1833 + 49 TRGrp 1279 - JT5 ILAAHn 1X46—01 
EmMkt 17.12 —M InvResh 462 —31 1 Landmark Funds: 


MenfGltl 1406 -32. IncGrA 1495 -38 _SmCaoC M36 +43 1 AZ TE 9-13 - 8 EqGtA 1073—06 

MjanSlrn 1237 +.141 IncGrB I5JB +38 PtmBaln 1730 — 31 I CATxAp 839—17 Grlnc 738 +36 

MerserFd p«L06 +.05 1 VTVJGrS 1X10 -.07 PumassuS 3335 +.16 i Convert p 1931 - 1 TxEX 933—43 

Meritfann 2S.7J -.11' WWgr 15.18 -37 Ruadenq Group: 1 CdAT 4347 —19 UHrcJ 731 +35 

Merrill Lynch: : Nomura nf 1831 —11 ' BalRmA 2132—44! DivGrp 930 —38 SefecMd Funds: 

AmertnA 9.77 — IB (North Am Funds GrowfhA 1530 — J19 DvrlnA P 1236 — 13 ] AmShsnpl447 — 13 

ArfiRA p 970 —31 AstAII p 1134 +34, WHY 50 1X91 —IB | EnRsAP 1415 —12 I SpISHS np 1046 + 37 

iJMA 1038—27' GtGrp 1432 — .13 PaxWotW nl3J9 — ■ 92 . EotnAP 871 —JW USGov pn 930 —36 

BoLA 12.19—04, Gwthp TX30 +.19 iPavsonBln 1247 — 13 EuGrAP 11.90 —.12 SeCgn» Group: 

Bfls’TIA 2570 - 39 Gripes 1276 -JM Pefiaui 1231 —031 FedUip 9.96 —37 1 Frontier A 1133 +.17 

CAA1A 973 —41 ' US Gvt p 039 —33 PenCopA XM —04 1 FLTxA 9.07 —.19 1 CopFdA 1X41 +.13 

ColMnA 1133 — 41 .NelrwGrn 2467 — .IB'PAMunlp 1146 —201 GeoAp 1338—39 COTxA 748—12 

CauFdA 28.15 —12, NeltwTrn 1031 —JB PeriannancB Rh; : GKSvAp 1454—16 CmStkA 1348—01 
Consult p 1238 —13 1 , Narwest Funds: EqConp 1170—35 GIGrAp 936 — 14 ComimA 1XH +30 

CoKiA 8J2— .10 AdiUST 937—05, Eqlnsn 1170 —35 1 GrtnAP 1339 — 35 COmmunD IS.O/+ J9 


Stratton Funds 
Dividend rdf 30 +40 
Growtn n 2044 +.11 
Smcapn 2678 —35 
Strong Funds: 

Advtgn 10.17—01 
AmUHin 948 +.11 


CapE 17339 —04 
DeaGst n 8638 —37 
Diveren 17438 —16 
Bxe. 737.41 —XI 
ExFd 24630—1.03 
FdEx 14937 +48 
ScFW 12949 +40 


AsiaPCn 1041 —.16 Varauard Group: 
CmStkn 1838—05 AdmJTn IXI6—I0 


EmMk® 1737 —46 UnSerOpHd: 

Europe p 1030 —.13 CapGrt 1348 —39 
EuroB 107 J —.13 QurtStK 1413 —35 
GvtncA 937 —10 US Gvt 935 —36 

GvtocB 937 —.11 Invesok 

GrtncAp X2S — .07 Dvnmp 1345 - 39 


GrtncAp 645 —07 

Grlncfl 645 —37 

HttCrB 1942 +33 

HilncB 1189 -JM 

HilncA 1191 +33 


FundA 845 + JM I Grtncn 1746 + 35 
GrwttlAP 1417 +31 GwthOpnML8S +37 


GrlncBp 240 
GrlnvB 1237 
I DMA C 939 
insMuB 9.89 
UnMCp 939 
intlAp 17.96 
MrtgAp 8.99 


939 -44 
9.89 —44 
939 -44 
17.96 —46 
8.99 —12 


MrtgBP 8.99 —12 
NWbCp B.99 -.12 
MtpTrAp 936 -32 
MtaTBp 937 —01 


Enferp2n 1839 + 35 
Enfrp n 1X67 —.01 
Gwthn 13.12 +32 
krtf 1X64 -49 
Shodown 1248 
TaxFrSn UL79 —11 
TaxFrL n 834 —40 
UMBBn 11.18—38 
UMBHrtn?36 +.03 
UMB Sin 1X47 +32 
Value n 2539 


HTiTdA X97 —35 
IncameA P 643 —JIB 
InfGrA 1049 —12 
MAT xA 776 —15 


tosMun npl837— 45 
Inturmn 14.13—19 
liUw-Eap 1553 —13 
tnvGNn 1X13—11 


EkilCm 1X10 —35 
Ba® p till — JM 
FxtnBp 1042 —06 
FXlnT n 1043 —36 


Ml TEA 6.96—13 MAlnin 1344—19 
MNTEA 7.17—12 MA Tax n 1X44 —42 
NatResA 1235 —02 MunBdn 1230 -45 
NY TEA 7.11—16 NJlntn 1341—18 


MigTrCp 937 —02 BaaanfflJeh(*Xaiser: 
MltlG 10.12—03 Diverse n 1195 —.09 
Mttlnt 136 —.01 IntlEqn X31 —.00 

MMSAp B34 — 33 UltlFIn 97H -37 

MMSBt 834 —JM Baird Funds: 

MCAAp 1047 -42 Adilnc 9.94 

MuCABpl047 — 43 BIChip p 1836 —05 
MuCACp1047 — 42 CaDdevp2336 +.13 
MuFLCp 933—33 BakrGvn 
ICATA 1337 -40 Bankers Trust: 
MU11CAB 1337 —40 InstANtot 930 —05 
MINBp 1047 -46 InsiEqn 1039 — 32 
MuOH CP 933 —48 InvImTF 1043 —.13 
MuNJBp 9.6S — 47 invlntEq 11M — .10 
MUNJCP 935 -48 InvUMn 1040 +.12 
MNYA 933 —22 BaronAst n 2135 _ 

MuNYBp 933—22 Bartfelf Funds 
MuNYCp 933 -42 BascVIn 1531 -JB 
NMuAp 1047 —45 Rxedln 1X14—36 
NtlAAuCo 1047 —46 Vllntt 1241 —19 
NEurAp 1243—11 BascamBal2245 -.12 
NAGvA 9.82 -.17 BayFuads (raft 
NAGvBp 932 —17 STYteto 931 — 35 
NAGvC 932—16 Bundn 9.94 -37 
PrGrthAplZJB . Equity lOJB +JM 


NMuAp 1047— 45 Fixedln 1X14 —36 
NjjMuCp ^ BttlcornBol2245 — 12 

PrGrthApl2L03 . EquoU 1X98 Tjm 
P rGrthBpll35 - BayFoods burnt: 
QusrAp 2440 +38 STYWdn 031 -35 
ST Mia p 0JH — JJ2 Bondn 0.94—37 
STMtot 0.06 —02 Equity n 1X98 +34 
Techp 2X88 +30 BeocWlI 3037 -31 
Wldlncp 1JB —01 BSEmgDbt 1X10 -46 
AmSaufli Funds Benchmark Funds 
Balance 1149 —33 Bakmcrt 1048 +JB 


OhTEA 746 —15 NJ Man n 1332 —42 
SmStkp 1841 +.07 NwUlr 3435 +38 
StrtlncA 744 -38 NY1TX np 1133 —22 
TxExAP 1333 —44 NY Tax n 1531 -40 
TxinsAp X16— 16 NYTEP 1837 -43 
USGrA 1234 *31 Peoplndt 1X94 —03 
USGvA 634 -35 ReaMldml746 + " 
UtllAp 12.90 +40 ShlnGvn 11.16 - 
CATEBt 748— 14 STIncpn 1245 — 
CTTEBf 739—15 5WnTP 1X15- 
FedScBt 1X83 —15 ThdCntrn BJB + 
FLTxBf 738—18 USTIrtt 1341- 
FutwBI 844 4 JM USTLna 14SH- 
GEqB 1X16—35 USTShn 1536- 
Gwthet 1X11 +31 Dreyfus Comstock: 
HYMuBt 1X10— 11 CapVciA 1133 
HYSecBt X97 —35 CapVdBtll39 
Incomes 633 -38 PStoAP 930 
UilGrB 1037—12 PtStgyOl 930 
MATxfll 776—15 Dreyfus Premier 
NaJResB 11X52 —33 CAMunA1332- 
NYTXBt 7.11 —16 CTMuA 1X18 - 
OHTxfll 746—15 CapGtti 1X27- 

,^=5 sSslssi 

TEInsBf X16 —16 GlblnvAnli90 - 
USGrBt 1146 +31 GtotnvBt 1578 — 
USGvBt 634 -35 GnmaA 1X58- 
UtflBt 1X90 +40 GnmaBt 1439- 


FLbit n '34B — .10 SBF Amt 1X50— 18 FxtBncTr 1X15 —10 
GNMA nttx 1X90 —.17 Rdrfty Advisor: LtdMGv 937—34 

GnCA 1331 — ^ EqPGR 2976 +44 First Unioft 
GMBdP 1X15— M Eqplnc 1X39—37 BrtTn 1X11-35 

GNYp 2033-48 GtWResC 17J7 —05 DalChl 1X10-35 
Grtncn 1746 +35 Gcvlnp 934 -39 Bafflp 1X17—34 

GwJtOpnlXra +37 GrwOppp2X02 +33 FxtnBp 1042 —06 
tojMdnnpl837— 35 HIMup 1X12—27 FXInTn 1043 -JK, 
ntomn 14.13—19 HiYldpn It 38 —10 HH3dTFBpl039 — 43 
nlw6a p lin— 13 mcGfp 1X48 —07 H*GdTFCtl039 — 43 
hivGNn 15.13 —11 Ltd TER plX15 —17 MnBdTn 1X16 -38 
MAMn 1U4— 19 LWTBR 1X83 —07 NCMunCMOJM -46 
MAT™ " 834 —32 LMTEl IXI6—17 USGvTBp 930-38 
ifvn? 1 " ,'H? Ovseap 1165 -39 USGvtCr 9 30 -38 
NJ Wn 1X41 — 18 sr pip 9.91—07 VrtueBp 1739 -34 

NJ Munn 1332 -IS strcrtOp p 2X03 —12 VnlueC tn 1737 -34 

NwLdr 3435 +38 meBtv hntihfi: VahteTn 7739 — JM 


HlthCrp 1940 +.03 
bill p 1130 -41 
Inf® 10.95 —48 
Jtmanp 1X81 —41 
LatAmG 2434 —45 
Lot AmGB 24.78 -45 
Padfp 1445 -34 
PocifB J447 —34 
SlrdAp 1174—31 
StrafB 1X14 —01 
TeleB 17.16 +32 


wSerOpKM: I Baton n 1416 —07 ; FLMA 

COpGrl 1348 —09; Equity n 1430—04 FdFTA 
QuatStK 14.13 —35 Wine 936 -35 1 OA1A 
US Gvt 935—361 IntfEq 1241 —24; GiBdA 
reesetk NYTFnp 11.05 —21 GiCvA 

Dvnmp 1X25 -39: USGvn 975 -04; GXtoA 
EmgrthpnlXl?— .01 I Laurel Funds . GiRsA 

Energy n 1032 +.04 Ba trKd n 1036 —0?! QUIA 
Environ 748 —D2i Intnknnx 1DJ0 —39 1 GrIRA 
Europen 1237 —34 I S&P500 I0J25 —32 « Health/ 

RnSvcn 1549-34 Stock n 1834 -JM , Insttnp 


EuroA 1433 
FedSecAp977 


1276 -JH Pelican 1231 —03 1 Fedinp 9.96—37 
939 — 33 PenCopA 594 —04 [ FLTxA 9.07 -.19 
2437 —IB 1 PAMunl p 1146 —20 I GeaAp 1338 — JN 
1X61-35 PertomwncaFds . GIGvAp 1X54 —.16 
ads EqConp 1170—351 GIGrAp 936—14 

937—05 Eqlnsn 1140 —.05 1 GrtnAP 1339 — 35 


DvrlnA P 1X66 —13 ! AmShs nplX47 —13 
EnRsAP 1X15 —12 I SpiSnsnp 1046 + 37 
EntnAp 877 — JM USGov pn 9.00 —36 
EuGrAP 71.90 —.12 Setamui Groups 
Fedinp 9.96 —37 Frontier A 1133 +.17 

FLTxA 9.07 -.19 I CanFdA 1641 +.13 

GeaAp 1338 -39 OJTXA 748 —12 

GtGvAp 1X54— .16 ( CmStkA 1348—01 

GIGrAp 936—14 ComunA 1X22 +30 


□iscavn 1743 +37 
GavScn 1X40 —38 
HiYIMu 9.96 —.10 
Incan 1036 —11 
InsMu n 10.90 —46 
inttn 1434 -40 
mvstn 1939 — 38 


633 —JNLazard Group: 


Growth npxX6I 
HtthScn 3X16 +.09 
HiYWnp 745 —.08 
lndincanplX16 +.02 
IntGovn 1238 —07 
mttGrn 1632 —.19 


1X40 +.05; 
1243 —12 
1170 —18 
1578 +.16 
1X69 —13 
9.99 — JM 1 
776 —17 J 


OnvCkJA 1138 — 12 AdiGavA 9.97—114. InRCp 1026—39 

CpITA 1130—10 COTF A 941—19. UlHIn 1046 —09 

DevCcp 1X50 —45- GvttncTr 938—36, STFICpn 9.91 —JO 

DragA 1X12 —37 ■ GvttncA 939 —35 1 STFltn 9.91—33 

EuroA 1443 — JM! WconwTr 1X10 —37 1 Perm Purl Funds 
FedSecA p 977 —.10 1 IncomeA 1X11 —37 . PermPtn 17.19 —.11 
FLMA 1X13—40, TFtncA 930 —.18 • TBTHn 6X90 +33 

FdFTA 1X71 -31 1 TFtocT 031 —.18 1 VBondn 5X58 — 37 

OA1A 1139 — 39 VatuGrAxlXlS -.10 PeritCGti 1X57—25 
GiBdA 737—38 VohiGrT x 1X15 -.11 iPhOa Fund 671 
GiCvA ia.95 —34 ' Nuveea Funds • Ptwena Series 

GfHdA 1338 —37 1 CA Ins 1<U4 —21 : BatonFd 1X83 — JM 

GiRsA 1X87 +33! CAVol 1X55—18: CoITxEd 1344 -.19 

GfUtA 1X10 -36 R. Vat 10.12 —20 1 ConApp 1834 —01 

GrIRA 1X71 +26- InsMun 1X57—41* CvFdSer 1B43 — 36 

HeaWiA 432 +32 ; MDVrt 1X12—17: EatyOpp 733—01 
Insttnp 1031 —06* AAA Ins 1X26—18* Growth 2142+31 

InflEqA llAfl — 14 I MA Vd 077—16* HBYieUlit 9.11-40 

MIMuA 1034 — 22 i Ml Vd 1045—16! InGrAp 932 —06 

MNNaA 1041 —.17 1 MurtBd 91* — JB ' tn&SI 931 —36 

LalAmA r!744 —45 ! NJ Vd 1043 —14' Inti 1271—16 


GrIRA 1X71 
HedthA 432 
(nstfn p 1031 
IntiEqA HAS 


HH3dTFBplX69— 23 Telecom 1744 + 32 
HiGdTFCtIX49— 43 Wldwp 1731 —18 


MnBdTn 1X16 -38 WkhvB 1742 
NCMunCIlOJM —26 GabeOl Fuads 
USGvTBp 9JO-38 ABCp 5035 
USGvtCr 930 -38 Assetnp 2X42 
VatoeBp 1737 — JM ConvScp 1133 
VatueC In 1737 —34 Eqincp 1139 
VahieT n 1739 —34 GUrtCP 1X01 


Peapmat 1X94 — <H L1B1 n 1X82—39 
PedWdml746 +.15 F *ay u»wta 
|jlnGvn 11.16 -OS -42 

STIncpn 1245 —36 AAAarn 1547 —.10 
AwSGrnlX26 — 05 
Z5ri2 r ".8 - 2? AMflrtnnxIHOJ— 08 
USTIrtt 1341 —10 Batanc 1348 —37 
USTLriO 14S8— 14 aSTSl 

USTShn 1544 -37 f£ti-3n 


EqPGln 29.97 +45 FniFtlFn 930 — 37 
Eqplln 1X50 —36 Ftofl Investors: 

IShlGv 0.72 —07 EmGfhp 1238 +.17 


Wldwp 1731—18 Tech n 2X35 +30 1 
WldwB 1742 —18 TotRtnx 1X12 -41 
tofeeJO Funds: USGovt HP 734 — J» 

ABCp 5935 _ Uliln T0J7 +.05 

Assetnp 2342 — JK VaCax 1732 -.11 
ConvScp 1133 —32 InvPRnp 9.99 —31 
Eqincp 1139 + 32 InvPfNY 1111 —41 
GlinJCP 1031 + 31 InvTrGvtBt 936 — JM : 
GiConv IB50 . IstdFdrv 1X95 -32 1 
GfTelp 1X11 +33 JP Growth 1X98 - 03 


Leisure n 22.94 +42 iLebenNY 746 —17 
PacBas n I5L77 — 41 iLeebRern 1073 —05 
Setlnan npX46 —37 Lcgg Mason: 

TxFree nPlX90 -40 AmerLd p 9.95 -37 


MIMuA 1034 —22 
MNMajA 1032 —.17 
LatAmA r 173J —45 
MnlnsA X18 —.17 
MuhLttlA 9.94 —32 
MulnTrA 1038 —13 
NVNattA 10.48 —41 
NJMA 1042 —19 


,14 I AAA Vd 
22! MlVd 
.17 | MurtBd 
25 NJ Vd 
17 NYlns 
02 I NYVoi 
13; oh Vd 
21 1 PA Vat 
,10 1 VAVd 


NYMnA 1135 —26 I OVH Funds 


1045— .16! InGrAp 932 —06 
9.1* — faCHBI 931—36 
1043 —14 1 Inti 1271 —16 
1X41 —2D j MulFlAp 1X01 —14 
1X52 —19 AAuIFTBd 1299 -.14 
1X40— 40 i StoCkFd 1157 —JB 
1041 —2D TEBd 1141 —22 
1045— 15 1 TotRetp 1X36— Jll 


USGvBx 931 —10 


HtthAP 2649 —23 
HiYdAP 1X27 —10 
HYAdP 1X49—08 
InanAp 7.05—06 
InvAp 825 -JM 
AAntnAP X91 —06 
AAaTxll 945 —15 
/MJTxllP 9.15—15 
MuniAP 930 —.17 
MnTxllP 199—14 
NJTxA P 9417 —.16 
NwOpAp 2X13 +.19 
NYTxAP 9.03 —.18 
NYOnAP 830 —10 
CfTCEp 1133 +.11 
OtlTxJIP 933 —13 
PATE 943 —15 
TxExA p 9JM —41 
TFInAP 1X00—29 
TFHYA 1X68 —33 
TFHYBt 1X68 —43 
TFInB t 1531 —29 
Texas p 9.12 —13 
USGvA P 1114 —10 
UtllAp 9X5 
VsfOAp 7.70 +JKI 


USGov pn 9.00 —06 inttn 1X44—40 

e&gmufl Group: mvstn 19JN — 38 

Frontier A 1143 +.17 MUtlffidn 9.94 —.16 
CapfdA 1631 +.13 Opptnly n2X93 +32 
COTxA 748 —12 STBond n 10.12 —35 
CmStkA 1348— .01 STMunn 1X21 — 38 
ComunA 1X22 +30 Toldn 2X86 *37 
COmmunD 1 5.07 +49 SunAmaricu Fds 
FLTXA 738 —14 BdAsetA pU99— 09 


AdmLT n 1024 —12 
AdmSTn 1038 —35 
Asset An 1X30 -36 
COnvfn 11.97 +33 
Eqlncn 1X30 —38 
Explorer n/6.07 +49 
AAargnnn 1X12 +411 
Prmcan 1946 +.14 
Quart n U33 —02 
STAR n 1346 —08 
TrinKn 3X55— .18 
TrUS 3147 +32 
STTsrvn 1043 — jjs 


GATXA 739 —15 
GibIEmroA143 +JTI 
GiEmeD 11.16 
GrowttiA 548 +37 
IncomeA 1X39—04 
InoomeD 1X34 —04 
mttA 1X53 —41 
LATxA 843 —.16 
MassTxA 7.09—14 
AADTxA X12 —12 
MTTxA 831 —16 
AAimTxA 7.97 —09 


BdAsetA P14.99— 001 STFedn IXIfl — 05 
BdAsefB p 14.95 — 30, STCoron 1X73 — JM 


DtVlntSp 406— 37 
EmGrA p 1751 +41 
EmGrB 1775 + 40 
FedScfip 1045 —07 
GrowthA 014.07 +.18 
Htincfip 847 — 36 
HilncA p 841 — Jl? 
TE htsApl247 —16 
USGvA B38 —33 
USGvB p 838 —33 
VahieB 1530 -32 


MOTxA 730 —M TARGET: 

NailTxA 738— .18 IntetBd hi 10.10 — M 

NJTXA 776 —14 mttEqn 1X63 —.14 

NYTxA M3— .17 LgCtmGrn934 — 37 

NOtotA 776 -.15 LoCopV 1X08 —02 
OhioTxA 843 —13 Mtpekdfniaos —38 
ORTxA 775—10 SmCapG 1233 +.15' 
PATxA 7.94— .16 SmCapV 1233 +35 
CAHyTkA 6.51 —38 TdRtBd 1031 —38 
CAQTxA 677—15 TNE Funds I 

SCTxA 832—14 AdiUSAP 733 —01 


CapvaBtlM? 

Kt8> SS 


m CAIriSn 1X45—30 
CATFn 1133— 27 


1X04 —37 
1532 +JH 
9.75 —34 


ndAn 19.94—13 
tGrA n 1X81 +3B 
ktxAn 1X85 —32 


LtdMat 1051 —34 FocGrA 1035 +.10 


Amondnc 1107—35 
Ambassador FM: 
BotocF 1032 +31 
Bondnx 976 —12 


ShtDur 1X02 —01 
SIBdAn 2X00 —05 
SmCdA 1138 +JM 
USGvA 1979 —07 
USTldxA n30.14 — l12 


CoreGrFn 17.13 +38 BenbamGrouK 
Growth n 1X06 +.18 1 AtSGovn 079 —02 


InflSIlcn 1348—17 
Munin 1224 —26 
SMdn 2044 4.11 
Common Sense: 

Govi 1033 —10 
Grolnc 1633 +JD 
Growth tsxs +39 
MunB 1331 —21 
Compass CrtMb 
Eatvlnco 1231 —36 
Fxdln 1X56 —08 
Growth 1144 —31 
IrtlEq 1X55 —16 


CAMunAlXIB— 42 
CTMuA 1X18 —19 
CapGtti 1647 —36 
CTMuBt 1X17 —19 
FLMunA 1433 -45 
G8>lnvAn1X90 —12 
GtotnvBt 1578—13 
GnmaA 1X58—13 
GnmaBt 1459—13 
MA MunA1158 —19 
MDAAutlAlZ06 —17 
MIMunA 1538 — 27 
MN MunAt517 — 45 
MDMUBM236 — .17 
MuBdBt 1X42 —30 
MuriBdA 1432—30 
NCMuA 1343 —28 
NCMufit 1X32 —48 


SSst 1*49.94—1 49 
Contra 3132 +45 
CnvSecn 1438—06 
Desfinyt 1755 +33 
DesKnyll 2831 *35 

DfvGth ne I2J17 —10 
Em0Grorl759 + 41 
EnuMkt 1832-37 
Equttncx3L73— 147 
Ed In 1873 -.10 
Eqldx 1748—04 


mtlnp 1X36—38 ^nCapG 1737 — 15 JPM Insflb 
NitTrp 1X36 -.19 Value p 11.98 +32 Bondn 
MMurtp 1X56 —.15 Gdaxy Fuads 
QUdGrp 1X92 +33 AsselAttnlUK-JB 
TeUncSh P1X34 — 02 EnGrtti 1390 
TdRTSYP 9.94 — 37 EqlVd 1111 +35 
Vc4uep 1151 — JJ7 Eqlnann125l -31 
FtagsNp Group: HiQBd 1056 -.ID 

AATEa p 1086 -41 tntBd 1047 -39 
AATECp 1035 —21 WEqfn 1X69 —40 
AZJEP 1068-40 MAMun 9.75 . 

OTEAp 1035 — .18 NYMun 1XS9 — 42 
QOTEp 939—18 STBdtl 1036 —32 
FLTEP 1X65-41 SmCoeanll66 +.10 
GATEp 1039—18 TE Band n1X62 —.19 
GtdRfap 1738 + 37 Gtduway Funds 
IntTEn 1049 —12 Govffldn 1034 —09 
KYTEA p 1X92 — 40 fndxPtn 1X94—31 
KSTEP 1X20-41 SWRWG 1X54 +35 
LATEP 1X75 —22 GdSecnx 1249 —05 
LUfTEp 1075 —06 GdtelGraup: 

MITE A p 1150 -42 Erisanp 2942—24 
MOTEp 1031 —18 GiifflFdn 1575 —01 
M1TECP1157— 21 Gtenmede Funds 


Growth np2X09 +31 JPlncome 93d — J» 1 Lexington Grp: 


GblGf ’ J D 9.90 — 38 ) PA MA 
Gvflndnp 1X21 —07 1 PhnxA 
HiYldp 1X83 J SpVlA 
InvGrifa 1X13—12 SlrDvA 
MdTFP 16JM-44 STGIA 
PATFP 16.15—26 TechA 
Snlnvnp 2270 -.161 TX MA 
TKFrlrt D 1X14 —15 j Wkttna 
TotRetnplX05 -.16 AtSRB 
ValTr no 1941 —16 1 Amerfn 


2X12—52. COPAPPAM46 +.18; WltJOPP 1X63-33 
1146—18 EmGrthAIXSS +43ipierpoitt Fds 
1X76 -35 GovtSecAn938-J» >' Bondn 1X20 -J» 


935 - I USGvtAp 7.04 -JM 

7.70 +38 1 HTYBdAp X03 — 37 
1231 +37 Sentinel Group: 

1049 —31 AggGrthp 5.90 +.05 


1349—44 

435-32 


BrtcmAp 1X1? —05, 
BdtuiB 1X15 —06 
BdincAp 1135 -.11 
CA TF A p 736 -.11 1 


1646 +JB OdtHrtln 1X89 —31 ) TEBandn1135 — 12 CATXBY 838—17 


Balanced p 1539 — J75 1 CapGrA p 15.J2 +.16 
BondP 647 —07 CapGrBpnl547+.16 


SlrDvA 1272 +36 Oakmrk 2X68 —381 EmgMEqHTO — 4? 
STGlAp 838 — 03 Oakmrtt 1548 —JM Equity n 1938 +35 

TechA 530 + 43 loberwets 2X24 +30 1 CapApp n 21 U -.12 

TX MA 1071 — 40 IOcSOnTEp1070 — 12* InflEqn 11.12—417 

WkttncA 0J» — lOOWtofl 1X&4 —41 1 POBotEG 1X16 +.18 


COnvBt 1973 —01 
DvrtnBI 1232 —13 


CumSJk p 2943 —12 
GvSecsp 1035—10 
Growth p 1736 + 34 


970 -32 OWJomin 1977 — IB ! PHBrim Grp: 


CnvSecn 14.11 +381 
CLdr 1X74 -.02 I 
GNMA nx X17 —10 


AmerfnBt 9.78 —17 Olympic Trials 
AZMBI 1038 —21 Bdtmced n1637 _ 


ST Bondn 937 —33 

i»n n !!£ 


^ p p « 
MITE A p 1138 


Votaep 11.98 +32 Bondn 9.77 — JB I CLdr 1X74 
iataxy Funds Divers, id n 1 0.1 3 — JJ3 GNMA nx 8.17 

AssetARnllJK— 32 anoMk61h92 -49 Gtobdn I4.lt — JJ* 
EnGrtti 1X90 . IntlEqtyn 1X45 —3* Goidtdn 642 

EqtVd 1111 +35 ST Bondn 937 -33 Gthlncn 1632 " 

Eqlncmnl231 —31 SmaOConlOJM +36 £1 Govt a 938 

HiQBd 1036—10 SelErtv n 11 33 * JJ3 SO XM 

IntBd 1047 —39 Jcskson Ndtouat Snnv 245 
kitEqfn 1239 -40 Growth 1132—03 TEBdnx 1X42 
MAMun 9.75 - income x 1X16— 15 WldEm HIS 

NYMun 1059— 42 TaxExx 1X36—18 Liberty Famfly: 

ST Bdtl 1036 -32 TdRtn 1076 -36 AmLdr 1X16 

SmCoEqntXM +.10 Janus Fund: Cre«rAPll37 

TE Band nl 032 —10 Balanced nl246 +31 EalncAP H39 
kduway Funds Entarpm 2137 +.18 EqlncCt 1139 

Govffldn 1034 —09 FedTx£xnX96 —16 FTleln 19JK 
ItxtxPin 1X94—31 Fhctncn 9.64 —11 FTar 11.00 

SWRWG 1654 +35 Fundn 1931 -31 HilncBd 1131 


AZMBI 1X58—21 Bdanccd nl63 
BalBt 1248 — JM Ealnan 1X10 
BasVfflt 2147 + 38 Intt 1734 
CalMnBf 1133 —41 One Group: 


EaJncm 1X10+31! AU51-A 


743 

745 

736 — 31, 


_ * AdiUSlV 741 —01 


Gthlncn 1X52 +.11 
SIGovtn 938 -JM 
SISIl 604 —35 

Snnv 245 +.06 

TEBdnx 1X42—45 
WldEm 1115—35 


CAMB 973-41 AsetAflpxlXt? — JJ7 ARS l-A 
CapFdB t 27,73 —13 B1uCEqA*134l — JD ARS II 
CdHIBI 842 —10 DscValA xl234 —01 AcSUS 
ClrtvGdB 1138 — 12 EalndxA xlX13 — JM AdiUSII 
CplTBt 1130 —09 GvArmAnW +JH AWSHl 
DrogBp 1X07—37 GvBdAp 931—07 
EtnTjBf 1440 -35 IncEqAx 1X52 — 11 
FedSecBI 977— 11 lncomeBdx9.67-.10 
FLMB t 1X13—40 IrtFxlx 10.10—12 
FdFTBt 1531 +32 ItrfTF A x 1079 — 40 
FdGrflt 1X15+34 IndEoAn 1128 — 11 


Gatoway Funds 
Govffldn 1034 —09 
fndxPtn 1X94—01 
SWRWG 1654 +35 


Ml TE C P1137 
NCTHAp 1X39 —18 Equity n 1X45 +.13 Venfrn 
NMTEp 9.95—19 intGavnx 1X42 — 13 WrtdW 


—21 Gtannwde Finds 


1076 -36 AmLrir 1X16 -35 
It CmGrA 0 1137 —09 

nl246 +31 EqlncA P H39 —03 
2137 +.18 EqlncCt 1139 — JB 
nX96 —16 FTleln 19J12 —25 

9.64—11 FTat 11.00—13 

Fundn 1931 -31 HilncBd 1131 —13 
Grthlnc 1498 *37 MnSc 1136— 16 
IntGvt 5JH— 03 USGvtCpxHJM —10 
Mercury 1X05 +77 USGvSecA105 —10 
ShTmBdn 198 — 31 UttlFdx 1112-37 
Twwin 2X04 +.17 UNFdCtxlll3 — 04 
4934 +36 Liberty Rnanckit 
2X54 —10 Gttllnc 1X90 —01 


FedSecBI 977—11 
FLMBt 10.13-40 
FdFTBt 1531 +32 
FdGrflt 1X15 +34 
GlAlBr 1X25—09 
GiBdBt 937 —08 
GlCvBf 1130—04 
ORsBt 1X83 +32 


7.13 
7.16 
747 

7JQ—01 

7.14 

7.13 -.01 
736 +.14 
1X29 -16 
X43 —10 


GeaBI 1X54 -39 PATFP 1344 —17 

FLTxBt 938 —19 TFInCP 1X39-41 

Gt&et 933-14 Wortdo 1230—42 

GrlnBt 1X38 -36 SentrvFdn 14.91 —34 

HtthBt 2X12 —43 Sequoia n 5635—51 
HiYklBi 1X23—11 SavwseasSariME 
IncomeBf 733 — 06 Motrix nx 1 136 — 05 
InvBt 840 * 351 S&PMidnk]-99 +36 


GtabGApll39 —12 
GrOPAp 1738 —03 
GvScAp 1135 —09 
GwIhAp 1077 + 35 
HilncA p 1X07 —38 
InfEaAp 1534 — 10 
lntBfflpnlX39 —09 
Ltd USA 1245 —37 


ITTsryn 1048—10 
GNMAn 10-19 —1* 
iTCorpn 9.66 — J79 
LTTBvn 1X10 —.11 
LT Corpn X92 —11 

HYCarpn 738—13 
Prefdn 032 —07 
IdxToffl n 932 —39 
IdxBal 1036 —.03 
Idx500 n 4338 — SS 
indxExt n 1930 +.12 
IdxTittn 1174 
KtxGron 1X14 -M 
IdxVrtn 1133 -.03 
IdxSmC 1X18 +39 
KtxEurn 1133 —10 
WxPocn 1149 —35 
idxlnstn 4646 —JH 
MuHiYdnl03» —19 
AAunibitn 1X11 —15 
MuLldn 1035—35 
MuLong nl077 —21 
Mulrtan 1241 —25 
MunShtn 1532 -34 
CAInsLTn 1X87—23 
FL Iran 1X50—19 
NJInsn I US —43 
NYlns n 1032 —43 
OH Ins n 1U4 —43 
PAbun 1X98—19 
SPEnror 1541 -JH 
SPGokJr 1239 - 36 
SPHtth r 34 43 —16 
SPSetvr 2X41 —Ms 
SPTechr 1934 +48 
SPiJtil 71.16 +38 


MATxBf 944—16 5P500nx 1X59 — W 

MunlB t 930-17 ST Gvt n 979 -33 
NJTxBf 937 — 15 VUPIn 1X01 +31 
NwOppB 12446 +.19 DM Funds 
NYTxBt 9.02—18 GovMed 9.73—10 
OTCB1 1136 +.11 Grolnc n 11.12 +.16 
TXExBf 9JM— 40 MATEInn 948 — 18 
USGvBt 13.11 —10 TExMednlOOl— 15 
UtOBt 931 . Sbawinut Foods: 

VfstoBt 736 +39 FxdlncTrnlXOl— 08 
VoyBt 1132 +.08 GrEqtTr 1039—33 


Motrix nx 1136 —05 TxExAp 739-16 
S&P MidnU49 + 36 ValueAp 7.99—33 


5P500nx 1X59 —09 TRAK Fuads: 

ST Gvt n 979 —JO InlrFxn 841 —37 
YklPIn 1X01 +31 IrtffEqn 10.12 —JJS 
7M Finds InttFxn 849—07 


MOSSTAP1632— 35 uSGron 1508—06 
TxExAp 739—16 inttGr 1335 -41 
ValueAp 7.99—33 Weilslyn 1X82 — U 


LoGrwn 9.97 +36 
LgVrtn 9.15—31 


rx 1133 —32 PSfcr Funds 
atxlIJ? +34 BatGrAn l| 


1130—04 LtVaiAx 1030—09 
1533 + 32 OHMUAX1040 —20 
1335 +36 SmCoGr x!733 +J» 


HiYldp X43— 10 UtOBt 931 - Sbawmufffe 

MogCao 1238 +.12 VfetoBt 736 +39 FxdlncTrr 

STMMI1 732 -37 VoyBt 1132 +.08 GrEqtTr 1 

ShrtTrp 674 — JH OaDnaaSve Group: GrlncETrt 

® or Funds: BostForGrlX22— II IntGvTTrn 

BatGrAn 1035 -37 BosfGrwinbL32 —37 LTIncTTn 079 -JM 
EaAsAn 1231 —03 BDSNumO!647 +A2 SmCPET 11.13 +34 
EqGrAn 1136 -JB BasNum01631 +33 SfenaTlWtf: 


MtgBkdn 7.96—35 
Munin 833 —42 
SmGtwn 1339 + 48 
SmVrtn 945 +32 
nwtnn xm -jm 


GNRBt 1779 +44 TFBdA 
HeaithBt 168 +31 lHCffca 


940 -36 
1031 —11 


114B -31 | QUM For VntoS 


m 093 + 31 NYTEp 1071 —21 irrtn 1X40 — 13 JtapanFdn 1232 -45 toSMurt 1031—43 

1979 —07 OHTEA p 1137 —.10 Munlntnxl047— 13 JataHtamdc TF Band 1032 —IS 


Europe 1979—07 
ExdtFdnlOUa— 37 
FWeO=dn 1933 —01 
fifty 1075 —02 
GNMtt 1X68—09 
GtoBd 1139 —15 


NYtStaStlXM'^ 1337 -.13 

JsSp ~T« Gvtsec n 9.97 —10 


1075 —02 USAp 
1X68 —09 VATEAP 
1139—15 Flex Finds 


PATEp 1X29— 16 SmCapti 1435 — 14 
TnTEAp 1TJJ8— 10 OfreeirtA 9.M — 06 
USAp 1037 +.10 GoMenaakDOUn +33 
VATEAP 1032 —17 Goldman sadBFmhr: 
lex Finds CapGr 1639 +41 


1633 +33 OHMuA 1X09—18 
IXS9 +39 OHMufll 1X09 —19 
1331—21 PAMlxW 16J50 —49 
ntafe PAMuBt 16J50 — 48 
1Z31 — JH TXMuA 2132 —39 
1X56 —08 VAMuA 1673 —33 
1144 -31 VAMuB I 1672 —3* 


Bandnp 1977 —38 
Gtobl pn 942 — JD 
Growth np 1X80 —05 
Mulrfdfpn 549 — 02 


IdxStkn 1231 —03 CaTFIn 1X09 —14 
lrrtBondnx9J7 — .12 CaTFIn q 9.94—22 
InrtStkn 1X47 —00 CaTFSn 1(140 —05 
SmCoGrnl449 +.16 CalTFHn 948 —16 
Ain rtMfldu r Imc Coitfl n 11.16 —45 
Bondnx 9.76 —12 EqGron 1143 — JD 
CoreGrn 17.12 +J77 EurBdn 1X57—14 
Grwttin 1435 +.18 GNMAn 1049 —09 
iniSond nx 977 — 12 GokUnn 1158—15 
InttSlkn 1336 — J» IncGron 1436 — 31 
SmC0Grnl448 +.15 LTremn 039—14 
TFhttBdnfOJO — .13 NITRn 1074—14 
Ambassador Ret A- NTTFLn 1133—42 
Bondtx 9.76—12 STTremn 941 — JD 
CoreGrt 17.12+37 Tari9V5n94.14 — 41 

Grwlhl 14JB +.18 TatMOO n 6933 — 37 
intBond lx 947 —12 Tar20Q5n 4840 —66 
IrtlStk t 1336 —SH TafWIO n 3X1* —30 
SmCoGr 11448 +.15 Tar2015 n 2643 — 41 
TFIntBd tx 1040 —13 Tcr2020ti 1845 —35 
Amcare Vintage: TNaten 1040 —36 

EaOitV 1039 +JU Ufillncon 970 + JJS 
Fxinco 10.07 —07 BeraerGrouK 
IntdtTF 1X15—11 100 pn 17.13 +.19 

Amer AAdvanfc 101 an 1138 —JM 

Baton n 1X27 —05 SmCoGr 237 +.03 


CaTFIn 1X99— M J^nBd 10^ -42 
SIS 1 " ,2-25 “3? NJMun 11.10—19 
£“15" 'J™ “‘J* ShTflrU 1032 —04 
Ca lTFH n 948 —16 camposBe Grouse 
gJT* 1 - n JJ’JS — BdStk p 11.96 —07 
tSS" - W Growttip 1233 —14 
f'£5& a 2-2 “•& lOCOFdp 936—39 

GN'AA" 049 —09 NW50P 1347 +JB 
GokJInn 1X58 —.15 TaxExp 736—16 
(pcGron 1X86—31 USGovp 1038 —10 
LTroas n 939 — .14 dnestoga Funds 
Nrrnn 1074 —.14 Equitv 1112+37 

NTTFLn 1133—22 man 1037 —.06 

STTretnn 941 — JD LfdMal 1034 — JM 
T ori 90S n 94.14 —U QxmlMutuofc 
TaGMOO n 6033 —37 Govt 1031—10 

TartOOSn 4840 —M Grwth 1157+35 

TarWIO n 3S.16 —30 tacome 9 JX —.03 

Tar2015n2643 — 41 TotRef 1437 —02 
Tar2020n 1845 — 45 Coplevn 2033 +46 
TNaten 1040 —36 CoreFundj: 
urn neon 970 + JJ5 BatonAn 1035 +31 


Dreyfus strategic: 
GiGrp 3128- 


GroCo 2938 +43 Growth nplXSO 
Grolnc 2241 - Mulrfdfpn 139 

HiYld 1248 —25 RnMInen 1X56 
InsAAunn 1131 — W Farfis finds 
IntBd n 1038 —38 AstAII p 1471 
biterGvtn 939 — 37 CopAep 2532 
IntfGrt n 1733 —18 CoPttlP 1773 
tnvGBn 738 -OB Fiducrp 29 J3 ... 
Japan n 1X48—07 GtoGrth p 1447 +35 
LafinAmnliJM— 22 GovTRp *37 
LtdMun 9J9— 17 Grwthp 2949 
LowPrr 1831 +34 HiYldp 838 
MITFn 1172 — K TF MN 1034 


Gtolncx 1433—13 
Grlnc 1X11 +.18 
WftEq 1775 —M 
Muni Inc 1X94—42 
SeEq 1538— JH 
SmaCOP 2031 +.15 


AstAII p 1671 +31 GoUman Sods lot: 

CapApp 2532 +37 AdjGv 0.94 

CoPttlP 1773 +.16 GovAg 9.93 —JH 

Fiducrp 2933 +41 5hrtTF 10JJ0 —07 


MurBd 1X55 —42 Growttip 3830 —42 .IS'TS 

NJMun 11.10—19 Income P 14.18 —41 rSTfr-^ a ™ 

ShTflrU 1032 —04 InvA 2134 — JOI Tii 

amposBe Group: InvBt 2147 —01 Jf£J -?*. 

BdStk p 11.96 — 07 DapreeMufw* 55LT£“ 

Growttip 1233— 14 WGov n 1034 — .10 MNTFn 1047 —41 

IncoFdp 936—39 KYTF n 730—09 “«e0an 7XK +JJ 

NW50P 1447 +35 KYSMfn 543 —04 J"?'«?nr3439 \ 

TaxExp 736—16 EBIFuuds MATFnellJ3 — 46 

USGovp 1038 —10 Equity p 9042 —14 MtgeSecnlXM — 06 
baestoga finds fiexp 5X82-47 Wvtwln B45 —19 

Equity 1512+37 Income P 4772 —40 NY HY ne 1X14 — 36 

l nan 1037 —.as Muffiftx 4X46 -JM NYtene ll^ —MB 

LldMal 1034 — JM Eaton V dock NewMtonll32— O 

bun Mutual: China p 1448 -38 NewMIH 1234 —31 

Govt 1031 —10 EVStk 1237 + 33 OTC 2433 +45 

Grwth 1537 +35 Growth px 818 _ OhTFn 1134 —22 


-.13 John Hancock: TFBand 1032—15 

-.14 CATE! 1170-42 USGov 9.15 —JM 
-JM DiscvBt 0.37 +36 UIN 1135 +34 
+33 Growth p 17.13 +46 LTMrlVP 930 —39 
rty: llAcare 1X08 +JM LmlTrmP 1032 — .03 
+41 LTGvAp 8J0-32 Lindner Forte 
-.13 AAA TEt 1130 -44 Dfvn 2731 —38 
+.18 AAgTEB 1131 -42 ^jndn 2X» +.13 
-06 NY TE fp 1234 -44 .'Wn 1U6 +36 
-32 STStroffl 874 —05 L SP m “ 5BV ^? : „ „ 
-Jn SpdEAp J6.1B +30 Bwtan -.11 

+.15 SpdEBp 1639 -30 £ tb “T. JH? —}S 
O: SpOpsA 839 — JJS Growth «l 1334 +JM 

SpcOpsB XV +35 * n «Snn 13*10 -74 
— OT Sh^fa SmttjnlXW +35 

-JO? TaxExfp 1074 —40 .. 


GovTRp 837 —38 Ggvta finds 
GfWttlP 2X30 +38 DvtpBd X92 — 45 


944 — JD | J Hancock fieediro 


LowPrr 1831 +34 HiYldp 838—10 EmflMk 1734 — 60 
MITFn 1172 —24 TF MN 1034 —15 GlGvln 937 —13 

AANTFn 1X47— 41 TF Nat 1083—20 bittEq 1X16—30 

Magellan 7X52 +78 TF NY 11.12—15 PfcStg 934 —45 

Mkt1ndnr3432 — JJ7 US Gvt 9J0 —10 SmG* 1749 +.13 

AAATFnellJS — 36 Fortrssslmsb GvtEqtvn 7336 +40 

MtgeSecniJS — 06 AdjRtt 978 —01 Gradtean JMcDoaaM: 
Muncoln B45 —19 Bandr 934 — 38 EstVatpn2X12 +37 

NYHYnelZH — 36 G1SI mx 843 —11 Govlncp 1337 — 13 

NYlnsne 1138 — 30 Muni net 11139 —18 OHTFo 1244—46 

NewMkln1132 — 42 OHFortp 1145 — 21 OppVoIp 1835 +42 

NewAAO 1234—31 


AvTech 1144 +.12 
EnvmAp 936 +31 
GflnBf 9.18—10 
GtabAp 1156—37 
GtabBt 1330— .07 
GUnA 9.19 — J» 
GtabRx 1749 +.12 
GiTech 19.15 +37 
GaldA 1533 —17 
Gokfflt 1579 —17 
PDCBas 1X11 —38 
RgBkA 2X49 -JM 
RgBkBt 2X41 — JU 


Gttllnc 1040 —01 MlMUB f 1035 -41 
faSMunl 1031 —43 MNMBt 1X52—17 
TFBand 1032 —15 i MnlnsBt 8.17 —17 
USGov 9.15— JM MnUdBt 9.94 —JB 
UIN 1135 +JM AAutntB 1038 —12 

TMrlVP 930 -09 AANattBt 1037 -42 
mfTrmo 1032 —.03 NJMBt 1X92—40 
Mner Foods: NYMnBt 1135 -46 

Dfvn 2731— 38 NCMBt 1033—20 

Fundn 2180 +.13 OHAABt 1073 -41 

Utlln 11.16 +36 Pocflf 2145—31 

aam'BSavfes PA aaB t 1144—18 

Bondn 1136—11 fimxBt 1X52 +JM 
GtoBd n 1077—15 STGfflt 838 —03 
Growth a 1X04 +36 SoVfflt 1537 +31 
IntflEq n 1X10—24 StrDvfit 1270 + 36 
SmCdon 14.17 +35 TechBr 5J1 +43 
ordAbbetfc TXMflt 1X71 -40 

AUHtdo 1X68 — 33 UttlnBtx 9.18 +37 
BandDeb o 936 — JM WldlncB f 938 —II 


IntEaBt 1133— M UlOorNC 1047—15 
GtHdB 1X34 —08 Oppanheiine r Rfc 
LatAmBI 1741 -45 Asset A p 1XJI7 -37 
MAMBt 1X69-46 CATE A pi 034 —47 


EalnA 1131 —31 
pxdlnA 1032—12 
intmGvAn1X23— 09 
NJAAuAn 1X46 — 17 
STtnvAn 9.98 —31 


Gr1nc£TrnlX60 +31 Tempietoa Grows 
IntGvTTrn 9.92 —37 Amer Trrx 1378 -JJ3 , 
LTIncTTn 979 — JM CopAcc 1536—18 
SmCPET 11.13 +34 DevMfcf pel405— 43 
wroTnisJ: FarwiP 937—37 


t WelHnn 2046 —U 

841 —37 Winds' n 14.13 —13 
0.12 -35 wnd&il 1X87 -.12 
849 —.07 Venture Advisers 

9.97 +JM IrtCPIx X18— 09 
9.15—31 Murtrtv 942 —OP 

7.98 -35 NYVen 12.02 —IS 
833—42 RPFBtX X19 — 35 
339 + 48 RPFGRtXl532 +.M 
945 +32 RPFGIx 1133-42 
846 -38 RPFCv 1736 - U 


Victory Funds 
CaroBd 972 —09 
Equity 10.96 +38 
Govffld 977-38 
ShtGylnn 931 -33 


Asset A p 1X07 — JDlneaeerFond: 

CATE A pi 044 -47 I Eqincp 1634 +37 


GtoBd n 1077—15 STGfflt 840—03 
Growth a 1X(M +36 SoVIBt 15JB7 +31 
IntflEqn 1X10—24 StrDvfit 1270 + 36 
SmCdon 1417 +35 TechBr 5J1 +43 
LardAbbeffc TX AAB I 1X71 -40 

AJBltdP 1X68 — 33 UttlnBtx 9.18 +37 
BandDeb p 936 -JM WldlncSf 930 —II 
DeveIGth pi 032 + JI9 MerrimanFds 
Ea 1990 P 1416 —.07 AstAII nl 1138 —JO 
FdVahiP 1X96 —33 COpApPf 1X90 +31 
GEqp 1X60—11 FlekBdfn 1045 —03 
Gllncp 838—13 Grin 1137 +31 
GoulSocp XB7 —04 MrtUteMsSt 
NafTFTr 470 —14 CapApA KLffl +.16 


OlpHYP 1X04 —11 
DfSCFdp 3876 +.19 
EqlncA p 9.98-35 
EqlncBt 934-35 

GIBiap 2X77 +J15 _ ... 

GiG+P 1549 —41 IrtCOmen 1X07 —05 RCM Fund 21 .*Q +.03 
GtabEnvpT131 - Europe P 1843 —13 1751 Trust 
GlobalAp3X91 — 46 fionrFd p2346 — JD Aeffld 2677 —22 
GtoWBt 3678 —47 PinMBdPlDJO —17 Core 353* —M 

GotdP 1X79 +JB InttGr 2X75 —42 EmGr 3697 +A1 

GviSecA p 1X91 —35 Honrllp 19JD— 14 IntBd 2538—12 

HIYWA 1442 —14 PfoTfnep21JM +JM ST1F 1832 +31 

HiYldBr 1437 —14 ST Inc 191—31 Value 2647 -49 

InsTEAp 1736 —46 TaxFresp 12-23 —23 Rainbow n 533 —36 
WTTEp 1470 —46 USGvo 1XM —09 ReaGrop 1X62 —JM 
InvGrAn 1X81 -39 WWhREl 1X54 - Regis Fund: 


Amerlcp 1135—09 
Sorts 0-53 —09 
CapGr p 1575—03 
Gold 7-62 -36 


1404 —14 
997 —13 
1X84—35 
1X91 —40 
1137 -43 
1X33—47 
1692 +38 


CrtMuP 1038 -45 
Cplncp 1036— IB Growttip 1741 —10 BalA 1146 — JD 
EmrGrp 1459 +41 Incan p 934—11 Baidpnx 1075 — 11 
FLInsp - 930 —46 RIEstP 1X98 -39 CAWx 0.84—17 
Grincp 1177 - SmalCop X10 — 01 CapGr 3233 +41 

GrowthB 1146 +43 World p 1630—11 CapGrBt 3X48 + 4V 
InfiGrp 10.92—13 Templeton tosa: EqwBypnlill _ 

NatMup 1133 — 45 EmMSpelXSJ —4! GcVlnck 1130 — 10 
STGip X40 —01 rtorBaSx 1344 —35 Grlnc 3132 +.10 
USGovp 1X14— 12 FEsafix 11JM— 137 GwWSh p 1 546 — 19 
tone! Select: GrwthSx U3Z — 24 GrlnBr 3XM +.10 

MDMultnlOJS— 17 ThirdAyV 1734-38 IntiEqA 1218—20 
US met In 1X35 —37 Thomson Gtmp: NYTFx UM -36 

USIncTfl 1045 — 37 EqlnA 1X95 + 32 STBdp 10JM -3S 
ValEqlm 1X39 +32 GwttiA 22-43 +70 TF tnem XII30 — 32 


Forenp 947—37 ShtGvlnn 
GfebOp Pxl343— 1 48 VlstaFumls: 


USGavx 1192 


Growttip 1X69 +.13 RBBGvtp 10.16—07 
trtcanep 1X07—05 RCM Fund 2143 +.03 


InvGrAn 1X81 -09 WrrthRQ 1X54 _ 

AASincGrA2270 + 42 Ptpfir Jaflray: 

MtglncA 1331 —37 BOtancp 1X15 — JM 


MtgtocA 1X81 —37 
NYTaxA pi 276 —29 
NYTxatn!X77 —29 
Oppen 11.12 —JO 
PA TE A P1249 —30 
Sped An 27.93 -31 
StrtncAp 530 —06 
HrlncBt ilO— JM 


EmerGr 2X59 +49 
GPvtn 9^1 —.1! 
Grlnc 1X41 —31 
InsfOv 11.14 —19 
instGvAdi 992 — J6 
AANTE 1032 —16 
NOttTE 1030 —47 


Aeffld 2677 —22 VdEql in 1249 + 32 
CBre 3544 — JJ8 ValEqTn 1249 + 32 
EmGr 3697 +A1 VAMuT n 1072 — vl5 
IntBd 2538 —12 VoMunl 1 1072 —16 
ST1F 1X02 +31 SkySne Flirts 
Value 2647 -49 Europe 1074 —12 
lainbow n 533 —06 MorrtMyfn 9.95 —.11 
WaGrap 1X62 —JM SoEquttn 1BA5 —.11 
MgisFund: SpEquittl 1135 —.05 

CAB Bat 1X16-38 SmOftBamev: 

CABEO 1332 —38 ttlttC 1X09 —AS 
DSIDv 1X95 —05 CapApA 1617 +47 


DSiLM 972 —07 
FAAAscc 1X42 +32 


CdPApB 1533 +47 
EquityA p8471 — 4l 


ICAA5C 1693-37 GIGvtA x 1230 — 18 
SAMI Pfdn9Jto —.10 IncGroAttOJl —10 


GwttiA 2X43 +40 
IncoA X19 —09 
hlllA 1277 —41 
OparA 31.13 +43 
PTCM/A 1244 —20 
ShlGvA 931 — JM 
TargetA 1273 +.14 
TExA 1133 —39 
USGvA 940 —08 
EqlnB 1X93 + JD 
Grwthfit 2X02 +.19 
tncameBt 8.14 —39 
InflB t 1237 —41 
OparSi 3047 +42 
PrecM«BlX05 —40 


1295 +JD STBdp 10JM-35 
2X43 +40 TF Incm X1139 —32 
X19 — JJ9 Vohjmet 1635—01 
1277 —41 VoyweurFdS 
31.13 +43 AZIns ia97 —23 
1244 —20 COTF 1036—41 
931 — JM FL Irtsd 1035 —22 
1273 +.14 GraStkp 1792— JM 
1133 —39 IATI 933 —41 
940 —.08 MNins 1X59 —.16 
1X93 +JD Mlnofat 1X88—08 
2X02 +.19 MtrmTF 1X35 —IB 
8.14—39 MO Ins 1049 —13 
1X47 -41 NafTTF 1032 -42 
3047 + 42 NO TF I07B — 19 
1X05—40 US Gv 1040—12 


1X91 +JM GHMNTE 1X13 — 23 J Hancock sovergas 


IntdtTF 1X15—11 100 pn 17.13 +.19 

Amer AAdvanfc 101 on 1138—34 

Baton n 1X27 —05 SmCoGr 237 +.03 
Equity n 1390 —08 Bernstein fits 
InttEaty n 1247 —14 GvShDu n 1248 — JD 
UdTrmn 9.94—04 ShtDur n 1X56 — JK* 

ArnsrCapOat intDurn 1X19—4)9 

CmstAp 1648 +32 CaMun 1332—13 OoMmHus» 
Cmsfflo 1647 + 32 DfvMun n 1X35 — 1 13 AstAllp 13J 
CpBcffl px 730 — 38 NYMain 1X35 — 13 Equity P 161 


eroer Grow Eqldx 2138 —07 TradGvt 1143 

100 pn 17.13 +.19 GiBdA 971 —11 Traflnvp 741 

101 on 1138 -JM GrEaAn 1041 +38 TrudTotl P 8.63 

SmCoGr 237 +.03 JntBdAn 9.90 — JM Erton Vance dor 
emstetaFds WtGrA n 1345 — 26 FLLtdp 938 

GvShDu n 1248 -JD VdEqBpnlXfi +.10 Gavto 97S 
ShtDurn 1X56— 03 CowenlGr 11.12—09 NaiMuno949 
intDurn 1X19—39 CowenOp 1X80 —04 Eaton VLMMtys 


toCBosp 833 —JM Ovrsea 2848—42 
Mun8dx 1X08 — 26 PocBos 1837—37 
STGbl I 9.03—11 Puritan 1613—07 
STTsyp 5532 +32 RealEstnxlAHJ — , 16 
SocEatp X42 — JM RetGrn 1X17 —06 
TradGvt 1143— ja SWTBdn 947 —35 
Tradlnvp 741 — 01 STWkJn 990—37 
TradTPIlP X63 +.17 SmaBCapll47 +40 


OTC 2443 +45 44 Wall Eq 646—05 GHNatTE 1043—17 
OhTFn 1134 —22 Forum Funds; Greenspnwl4J4 +jq 

Orroea 2848 —42 hwBnd 1030 —08 GwBdtan Funds 
PacBas 1187 —37 IrrvStk 230 +31 AStAlloc IIJ» -32 

Puritan 1613 —07 ME End 1X50 —14 GfiG Intt 1X36—12 

ReaEstnx 14.10— 16 TaxSvr 1037 -38 Bondn 1111—07 

RetGrn 1X17 —06 Pounders Group: ParfcAv 2031 +.15 

SWTBdn 947 « Balnp 9.13 - Stock n 2932 +.16 

STWldn 990—37 BhieOipnp676 +JM TaxEx 935 —21 

SmaflCap 1147 +40 Discvp 2133 +32 USGovt 1X16—37 JAVBal 


AChA 1113-37 +FTXP 
AChBt 1X07 —07 TppAg 

1JS-JS TFHI p 
BrtBp 1X57 —10 TFMI 
BandAfp 1615 —14 TFWAi 
InvAp 1490 —12 VrtuAn 
I five p 1439—13 USGovt 


TaxFrp 1147 -44 
TFCTp 1X30—19 
TxFrColpl039 -30 
TFFLp 4.02 —.12 
TFMOp 541 —12 
TFNJp 541 —IT 
TaxNYp 1142 —32 
TFTXp 1X12—23 


TFPAp 605 —13 
TFHI p 5JD— 12 
TFMI 697 —.12 
TFWAp 600 —14 


CapApB 1056 +.17 
CapApC 1034 +.16 
EqlncA 1141 -JD 
EqlncC 1141 —02 
EqlnvSIA 1334 +31 
EqlnvC 1X47 +31 
GavSecA 746 —04 
HilncA 636 —36 
HilncB 635 —05 


StgSTIAp 445 —03 PocEutG 1X19 —19 
SHnGrAp 610 — J* Sector p 1746 +.10 


SrSpEpn 1731 +.15 
SrGwthfl 1X10 — JD 
SteSTRn 1X04 
SirBaln 9.94 -34 
SterBln TIJ4 +33 
TSWEq 11.11 +J» 


IncRatA x 730 —JM 
IntIA 1X09 —39 
tatlB 1795 —M 


ShlGvB 931 -JM WoddeSHMeSfc 
TaxExBt 1133 — 49 TatRnt 1234 +.07 


Targets 1231 +.13 Growth 1600 +.19 

USGovfit 946 —38 UdTerm 9.95 —JM 
bombuni Fds: Muni 1038 —44 

IrrtMu 1X09 —15 Gtobrt 933 —.07 

UtfTIn 1X25 —06 WrtlSl 842 +.16 

LtdCtd 1X73 —09 Wurtwig Ptnaxc 

UdOri P 1233 — JS8 Grlnc n 1635 - .SB 


MoGovtA 2?IM —IS Thornburg Fds 


tCS^b PtaSJin S* m Stoflln 11Ji MuCalAxl23l -49 

ISEflt S^T^iSn Sb m TSWEq 11.11 +J» MuFL Ax 13.13 —JO 

2’2 ~ M SSttTNre in « TSW Fix 1X21 -.10 MuLldAX 643 — 10 

inn TSWlnM 1156 -42 MunNlAx\335 -39 

R7? Tim +11 RchTangn 1738 — U MuNJAxU38 -42 

52Sm5. 5m tni Iniihf” »1 Rembrandt Funds MuNYAxIllS -48 

ESS?'" KS AstoTI 036-45 SHTSY 609 —02 


TotRtBttl X70 +JM 
USGvtp 033 — .OT 
VotSlAp 1430 — JD 


InKEqp 1033 —05 Overland Express 
InttFxInt 7.93—11 AstAUA 1139 —JD 


Bdldx 2735 —16 

§2^5 MTrnx 9.95 —09 USGvIA 1158-39 

WfflStt info OFxInTrnlDJO —15 UfilApx 1277—07 

MklGrLnTlIO +42 GwthTrnxl037— JH SmBrShD fnMUQ —37 
STBondnlX29 — M rntlEqTrnIX70 —19 SmBrShG IX 996 —07 
So&n S Tjg SIGvFIT 935 -38 SmOtiBniySbrsn A: 
TJd^BdnlDJS-.T3 SmCapT 1035 +JD AtfGvAp 939 
refSVwt Grout* TEFlTrnx932 — 40 AdvsrA p 27 40 + 47 

iSSSrolxS— 07 TaxFlTr nx9.99 —.10 AgGrAp 2731 +34 

^dtan inisIlA7 ValueTrnxI0.13-.ll AeorAp 1136 -31 


LtdMu/tP 1339 —10 
NM Ini 1X32—13 


MuNY AklllS — 48 NM Int 1X32 
SHTSY 400 -.02 Tocquev 1145 
USGvIA 1158 —09 Tower Finds 
UfilApx 1277—07 CapApp 1X81 


VceuAppptlJD +.01 
USGovt 684 —06 


SmaOCen 1147 + 40 Discvp 2133 +32 USGovt 1X16 —M7 J&VBol 1345 + 32 

SE Asian 1332 — 35 Fmtrnp 2837 +46 HTinsBjp 13JM -JB KSMun 1237 — 15 

StkStc 1930 +41 GavSec 034 —39 HTMgFI p 1X15 -36 KS IMuriLl 1248 —13 

StrOppt 2042— w' 12 Grwth np lifts +40 HaillhCOto 9.11 —02 Kaufman nr 330 +JM 


USGvA p 9.98 —Of Lutheran Brae 
. L £S V ® 1 .IV, —to BroHiYd 9.7B —39 


Cpeda px 730 —.06 NrMixin 1XX5 —13 Equity p 1629 —03 
GorpBdA 0x6.98 —IQ WttVrtn 1640 —36 QP.MunN1234 — 15 
EmGtC 2646 + 44 BetwvnFdnlB90 +.10 Spodrt n 1132 — JB5 
EGA P 2640 +J4 Berwvnlncnll.99— 34 CrestFund* Trust 
EmGrB p 2604 +33 BfurudMCGlXll +45 Baton 937—09 
EntAp 1X52 +.12 Bamore Funds 9Bdn 9.95—07 

EnfflP 1237 +.12 Balanced 1X37 —04 SoEqn 1133 +JH 

EqtytncA p655 _ Eflultv 1034 — W Value nx 1145 +.10 

Eqwc8t 594 _ Eqlndex 1092 — JD VAMun 9.96 —22 

EqlncC p 59« . Fixed Inc 937 — 37 CuFdArtnlXOO — 01 

ExcftFd 11135 —03 STFixInc 9.80 —02 CuFdSTn 034 —04 
FdMgAo 1240 — 04 SCMunl 1037 —.14 Cutter Trust 
FMflBP 1130 —se, Btandiord FtndK ApvEan 1X09—06 

GfflqAp 1173 — .13 AmerEqnlOjO? +JJ9 Eqtvlnoon998 — 13 

GtEqBpn 1196 — 13 FIXTFBd n 696 — OB Govtjecn jaow — 06 

GfGvApx 660 —22 FWkfncn 533—05 DFAlntVal n 0.90 
GIGvBpfIX 834 — 41 GlGrnp 1X49 — JM DGInvestOR 
GIGvCpx 899 —21 PrcMnp 9.13 -JM Eautty 1034 —03 

GVSCApx 1033 —14 ST Gin 132—01 Govtlnco 932 —06 

GvScfi PX 1034 —14 STBandn X08 — 01 LTGovt 934 — 33 


reMMHusaro OHTxFf 992—14 

AsJAfip 1X21—06 CaTxFt 1045-13 
Equity p 1649 —03 FLTxFt 1B47 — 16 


ftAATxFt 1X16 — 14 fidaaySdecft: 
MTTxFt 934 —15 AIrr 1695 
NatTxFr 11X36 —.12 AmGaWr 2X14 -30 
NJTxFt 1X22—15 Autar 2X75 +98 
NY TxF f 1045 —14 Btotachr Z7.19 —15 
PA TxF t 1QX0-15 Brdcsf r 2395 +38 
Eaton VMaraton: Brokerr 17JT7 —42 

Chtadt 1297—48 Chemr 3138—13 
ALTxFt 16.54—4* Compr 2777 +99 
AZTFt 1X74 —47 ConPrdr 1547 +.10 
ARTXFt 1X37 —46 CstHoU r 1939 — 22 
CnlMnt 93S— 21 DfAaror 19.14+31 
COTxFt 1033—26 DevCamr1991 +35 
CTTXFt I0L39 — 25 Hecfrr 1X10 ±31, 
Eqlnt 11.17 +JI5 Energy r 1672 
FHTKFt 1093 -45 EngSvC r 1130 — 29 . 
GATxFt 1X16 —23 Enviror 1134 —16 I 


Trend n 5872 —14 Passnrtn 1030 —2 
USBIn 1073 —09 Sped Bn 7.97 +.T 
UtBInc nx 1675 —37 WldwGr p 1X14 — 0 
Valued 4139—19 Fountain Stoirae Fds: 
Wridw 1397—12 Balanced 9.96 +J 


Passwln 10.40 —20 Hanover Inv Fds 
Sped on 7.07 +.13 BtChGr 3CJ7 -JB 
WldwGr P1114 —09 STGv 976—03 
ouaialii Square Fds: SmCoGr 1030 +40 
Balanced 9.96 +.01 USGovt 9.01 — OT 
GavtSec 9-«! -35 Harbor Funds: _ 

MldCdP 1X49 +.10 Bond 1138 —08 
OuatBd 9.91 —06 QmApp n 1731 +.13 
QualGr 990 + 33 Growth n 1X62 +.14 
Franklin Group: inttn 2433—15 

AGE Fund x234 — JM InttGr 1X73 —21 
AtHUS 993 — JD SlrtOurn 9.14 +.02 


AGE Fund X234— 06 
ArtUS 993 — JD 
ARS 9.01 —05 

ALTF 1132—18 
AZTF 1130— 17 


Kerrwer Funds 
AfflGov 893 —01 
BloeChp 1270 —00 
CaB» ?40 —13 
Divlnca B31 —.06 
EnvSvc 1X14 —20 
FL Tx 1044—17 
Ob Inc 899 —10 
Grth 1176 
rtYlefd 1070 — JK 
Income 892 —jib 
I nttFund iftfia —17 


Fund 1732 + 37 

Income 8.70 — OT 

Muni 835 —16 

OppGt 1071 +.13 

i MAS Fuads 
Balanced nil 36— 35 
EmerGr n 17.96 +48 
Equity n 2145 —06 
Fxdlnlln 11.16 —05 
Fxdlncn 1133-37 
GIFxin 10JB —08 


MgdAStS 046 
MgtUWA 949 
MgdAStC 0X0 +31 
Rich Bate 995 —32 
TqxExA 60S —16 
TxExfl BJB —16 


CATFA 11.10—16 
MuIncA 1075 —70 
StratGrA 1337 +.15 


ST Govt sum + J Preferred Group: 
USGvIA 1097 -30 AssetA nx 1038 —07 


QtoAPPn 14.08 +.02 
ErnGthn 2X48 +.08 
Flxdlnc n 1X13 —.06 
GtoblFxdnlX94— 10 


SpGrn 3330 +33 
Tx&nBd niatH— 13 


Fxdln n 1X15—37 


X70 — JW MIMuInc 1075 — 15 PBHGGrn 16JB +45 Growth n 1445 +.12 1 Trri: 


835— .16 Midwest: 

1071 +.13 AdjUSGvt 9.97 — JH 

: Govtp 10JW —IS 

nil 36 —JJS IntGvp 1X89 — Jl? 

17.96 +48 LesflUlilA 1032 +33 

2175 —06 LashTsvA 9.14 —10 

11.16—05 OH TF 12.10—43 

1133— J}7 TFInt p 1X92—11 

MOT —08 USGovLM 124 —14 


HYSecsrt 996 —36 Monetta 


PFAMCBFdS ttttln 1X35—13 i25» ed J-g f-Ji 

Baker 1037—05 ST Gov n 994 —03 gp™ '5^ 4 '-?2 

CapApn 1X87 +JH Value n 1192 —12 *1? 

Dtvutwn 1X02 — 05 Price Funds: „ lf *5SK. “-Sf 

EfneroMkt 1616—96 AtHUS 474-31 R £WlBICh _ 1479 —01 

EnhEqn 1136—02 Brtanoe HOT —OS RtahhmeGtwip: 

Eqlncn 1133—12 BIO>G HOT —02 3234 +33 

Inttn 1190 —07 CafTxn 1074 —18 RTFdnfaOTOT +.01 

MgdBtfl n 9.M —08 CnpAprrt 1X70 —07 GwSecp 13.19 +.05 

MidCaa 1442 +.11 


_ 1 IntlEqn 1X15 — 12 MonettMC 1X71 — .03 SmCpG 19JB +.16 


LtdDurFl nlX46 — JM Monitor Funds: 
MtgBkFc 10J3 —.05 Fxlnl p 21X4 


SmCpV 1390 —04 
UllSIkn 991 +40 


value n 1X04 —06 MurtBd 1X17—18 


1132—18 HeartttmdFds 
1130—17 USGvtp HU— 16 


Boilnv 21.92 —09 Votaep 2434 +34 Reflrel 
CAHYEd 10JM . W1TXF 1X05 —.18 Retire! 
Calms 1X13—25 Hercules Fund: Ratlre! 

CA irttermliLa —17 Eurovi JO. 12 —JO ReJtnM 
CaTTFrx 773 —11 LAmrVaJ 1172 —73 Retires 
COTF 1171—42 NAmriJrtnlOjn— 05 STGtab 


1X96 —19 Sett 
996 —19 SefV 
1193—04 SrrK 
1X16— .11 SpF 
1X63 -JJ8 Vat, 
091 —Of MFS: 
876 -37 MIT 
748 +31 MIG 


MunFto 1094 —24 Gwlhlp 36X2 —M P1MCO Funds: 

SeEan 1733 —08 OhTflp 2137—17 TotRetn WM —06 , 
Selfin 1X46 —05 FxInT 3146—18 TRIM 9 44 — « 

SelValn 1X37 —03 GrwthT 2642 -OT LawDur n 1X11 -JD ( 

SmCpVln1737 —34 hlEqT 2231 —13 U3IJ 1034 — J?4 

SpFItl 1X20 —.07 MtgBfc 990—70 Short Tn 995—02 

Value n 1X43 —02 Oh TFT 2137 —.17 Frpin 1033 —OB 

IF& SIBdT 3874—08 Global n 938—11 


Short Tn 995—02 Growth n 2X32 —70 
Fran n 10X3 —08 GwfWn n 1646 —05 


GvScCpx 1043 -—13 BdEndawxl79B —49 I MtxiUnc 1040 —16 1 KY TxF t 1X17 —25 


GovtOUt 043 — JM FtaSvcr 4944-1JB 
t-SIncf 770 -M- Foots r 31J» — 46 


GvTg07p 1343 — 06 Boston Co fast: DNeWHie 

GvTIAp 873 —10 As»MorBnll35— 35 Am Volt 2136 +45 

GvTIBp 1.13 —TO CaApBp 2EJ1 — JM CrtTxFrl 1XBB — 23 

GvTICp 8.73 —10 KgsBnp 1X80—10 CapGTOt 1X30 +31 

Grincp 1X07 -JD MgdIBrv lljfl —IB Canvtt 11.16 +JH 


LATFt 1040—25 
MDTKFI 10*4 —77 
MATxFt 1X65—73 
MlTxFt 1X51 —75 
MNTXFI 1X36 -43 


Hetolhr 6277—29 Equity 7.06 +JM 
HomeF 2495 —38 Ealnc MOT — 0? 
IndEoar 2046 * JO FIST ARS 9.02 — JJ5 
IndMalr 2140—30 FWWtetfnlXM— IS 


COTF 1171—22 hlAmrGrinlCJJl— 35 STGtob 748 +31 

CTTF 1136 —17 PcJBVal 1045 -76 SmCpEn 670 +.13 

CvtSec 1X77 - WWW 9.81 —05 Technoi I DOT +.17 

DNTC 9.81 +32 HeriHse Funds TXTF 1070 —17 

Equity 7.06 +JM ConApp P 1492 — .13 TotRetrn 934 

Ealnc MOT —0? Divine p 1040—11 USCM B.98 — 37 

FIST ARS 9.92 ■ — JH IncGro 1195 *02 Kampcrinvsis 


MTTAp HOT —31 ManirGld p 1049 —52 
MIGAp 1146 +JD MartlrSlp 1749 —OT 
BandAm1342 — 42 Montgomery Fds 
EmGrA p 1941 +44 EmsMM 1449—46 


Global n 938—1! 
HiYld 1X84 -39 
Grwth n 1X18 +30 
LTUSGn 1046 —10 


I0JJ7 —34 
4532 +31 


9.92 ■ — JH IncGro 1195 +32 Komper lnv«s 
11X64— -15 LMGmp 945 —01 Divtttct 643 —JB 
1X06—72 5mC0pSpl641 +40 Gvff 7.2S — 35 

978 —27 MghMark Funds Gwtti r 1797 —32 


GrOpA p 1133 —10 GtobCarn 1X19 +36 
GvLfAo 834— 06 intfEMW *7.13— T.26 
GvMoa px 648 —07 | lnttSmCapW79 —16 
GvScApx 934— 12 ( SbDurGi 037 — BS 


EmtjMW 1449 — 56 PNC Farts 
GtobCarn 1X19 +36 Balances 1298 —07 


In-JEMM 47.13—1.26 Be tec 129? — JB 
lnt1SmCaPM79 — .16 CoreEql HUM — 36 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 11) 



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Tel 071 625 1755 enrti cords 


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643 — JB HtlncAp 548 —35 5mCapn 1X14 +40 
7.2S— 35 InOpApx 7Jffl — .13 Marg Stott Fds 
797 — 32 LtdMAp 740 —J» AsimGrA 1X13 — 53 
RschAp 1X67 —.03 AsianGB 1X06 -93 
Sect A p 1X11 — JJ7 GlabEqA 1243 — .06 
TotRAp 1340 —35 GtobEaB 1116 —36 
UlBAp 737 -31 MG fixed nl345 — 1 16 
VotoAP 1X04 —07 MG Muni 1071 —10 
WoGvAp 1191 —.17 MraKgSaP 1392 
WoGrA 1644 —.13 Mare Staalnslk 

wotoia piaw —to AdCtrvn 11.01 — jm 

MoBdA 1036—43 AswnEflnJlJfi -32 
MuHiAx 936—15 Bal JOT — CS 

MuLtA 794 — 37 EmGr 1X47 *M 
MuALAp 1093 — .16 EmMkt 1X39 -Jl 
MuARA P 9.97 —2D EqGr n 1X04 +JJ7 
MuCAAp 533— .12 Fxancx 1046—12 
MuFLAp 9.99 —24 GCqtv 1XS3 „ 

MuGAA p 1X69 — 41 GIFxin n HOT —I 4 
MUMAAP1141 —10 HiYWrpt 1089 —17 
MuMDApUJfl —43 InltSCfl 1690 —05 
MUM5AP 937 — 20 InflEq 1499 — 37 
MuNCAp 1148 —43 RedYld 9.79—18 
NtaNYA P 10.79 —2D VofaeEq n 1 1.94 —38 
MuSCAo 1X12 — 32 SCValn 1135 +JJ7 


DivGron 11X2 — 35 Growttip 2591 +OT 
Eqlncn 1697 —00 MWCOPP 28.13 +32 
EaldX n 1149 —03 SOCAwp 2498 +31 
Europe n 1238 — JM RttncaBd 943 —.10 
FEFn 1191 -42 RtaicnStk 1X16 +36 
FUnsIntnlXIS —11 RiverinE 10A8 -JD 
GNMn 992— 07 RfverftGVIx 936 —13 
GATFn 1X16—20 RlvarwdeCrti 
GtoGv 041 -JM Eautty 1X99 —02 
Growth n 2041 —40 Fudln 9.97—10 
GwfWn n 16.46 — 05 TNMuOb 10.11 —13 
MYWn 9JJ7 — x: Robsirtssn Stophem: 
tncomen 9JM —87 Contra n hot —04 
tariBdn 9.96—12 EmGrp I9OT +39 
lnttOHn 1732—39 Vrtfius 1495 +42 
IntStkn 1X21 — 40 RadHStarfitc 
Japan n 11.15 —12 BdGrowpiX6l +31 
LatAmn 1X11 — 05 RoMup 1X18—35 
AlidShln 5 lP 7 —02 LtdNYp 348 —02 
MtfTxFrnm27 — 17 Rodney Square: 
M!dGopnl543 +36 Dhrlnp 13JM — 08 
NewAmn2733 +3? Growth p 1x53 +36 
N Aston 19OT— 95 InttEqp 1236—17 
Ne«£ran2O90 —06 Royce Funds: 
NwHrznnlX47 +.15 RennMu X42 — 01 


UfilApx 1277—07 CapApp 1331—31 IntEqun 10.73 -AZ 
mBrSMD faMUS — 37 LAMun UJM — IB I InstEan 1561—35 
merShGbl 096 — 37 ToWRet 9.99 —05 IntGvt n 10.12—06 
mMiBniySbrsn A: LTSGv 1043 —07 NYMurtnlOJO — .11 

AdJGvA p 939 .. TrademoTfc Funds: WasatChAg W.75 -.10 

AdvsrA p 2740 +47 Equitv n 1X69 —09 Weiss Peck Greer: 
AgGrAp 2731 +94 Govtlnco n 9.74 —.09 Divine 1390 -.10 
APPfAp 1136-31 KYMunnlOJU — 13 Govt 10OT-.08 

TdGAp 1X49 +.16 SIGovtn 9.67 —to Grlnc 23.98 +.15' 

Telln 10448 —17 Transamarica: Gwtti 12X63+2/3 

A^MbA p 10 TO -42 A«GvA 9.92 — JD QuartEqn5-Sfi 
CatAuAp 1539 — 48 CATFA P 1048 —32 Tudorn 2X97 -45 
Qvfittac P846 — 37 CapApp 13.15 +45 WeitzPVdl n 9.62 — JM 
FdValAP BJM + JM EmGAp Z743 +48 WatzVO n 1649 —.10 
GKtaAp 49 Gvtncp X14 — JJfl WdsFunds 

HilncA I 1239 — 39 GrlnAn 11.77 — 03 AstAUnx 1X11 —36 

"fCAA B40 —.14 GvSeco 8JI7 -37 B«re»dxnx9OT -.11 

WNYA 844 —.15 InstGv 25J» — J12 GwitiSlknlMJ +.11 

LtdMup 8.16—07 InvQuatP 8.93 —.10 S&P 500 n 1X46 —02 
LtdTrp 7.58 —07 TFBdA 10/1 —43 USTAJJnx 0J5 — 13 


CatAuAp 15JS0 — 4* CATFA P 104* ■ 
DfvsSttac P846 —37 CapAp p 13.15 
FdVotA P BJM +JM EmGAp Z743 
GKJaA p 3X02 —49 Gvlnc p X14 
HilncA t 1X09 —09 GrlnAp 11.77 
InICAA 840 —.14 GvSeco BJJ7 
IntNYA 844 -.15 InstGv 2536 
LtdAAup 8.16—07 InvQuatP 8.93 
LtdTrp 748 —37 TFBdA 1038 
MgGvA p 1X81 —lo TrnsanwricaSpto: 
MgMuAp 15.90 —46 BJCTUpl 11.92 
WtaMuAp12J7 —41 CATFB 1048 - 
JflMuAp 1X95 -47 EmGBt 2X57 
NyMuAp 1X97 — Jl Gvlnct 932 
PrMtAp 2043 —14 GrlnBt 1149 
SpEqAp 26.63 *A6 KYTF t 930 
PtTPA 15.95—35 HiYWt X2J 
UtflA p 1449 + 37 NafRsf 1542 
WlncAp 6.46 —02 TFBdBt 10A8 
WWPAp 142 _ Trust For Crrt Ur 


EmGrp 1934 +39 SmahBmySIwm B; 
VOJPIUS 1435 +42 AgGrfil 2735 +33, 
ndwtierfita: AparBt hot —31 


OTC 632 +35 HilncB t 1X09 —39 
Rremlern 633 +33 inverts t 1237 —23 


Value tn 933 —31 


5TBd n X9B — 02 Rustimore Group: 
STGtan 4.70 —32 AmGasn 1137 +.1? 


SmCVl 1436—35 5W tax n 1*4» —.14 
SpacGr 11.91—06 OTC Idxn 17.13 -.12 
SoecJn 1X00-38 USGUrn 9.78— .14 
TxFree n 937—18 US min 936 —09 
TxFrttr nl237 —.18 MO TF n 1036 —.15 
TFireUtt 1X46—12 VATFn 11.10— .16 
TxFrSIn 540 —32 RyrixWovo 1X4? —38 
US Int £48 — 03 SBCWWln 933 — JD 
US Long 1041 —12 SBCWWGr 1X34 -43 
VATFn 1X81 —IB SBSFfimts: 


MaGvBtalXSI —10 
MflMuBt 1190—46 
NJJWuBt 12.95—27 
NvMuBt 16.97 —41 
PrMtB t 20.13 —14 


ZUUOIREGM WoEqBt 1631 -ji 

X Ej«rt Service WcGvB HOT —16 

Zunch 01 / OT OB 5S. WoGrB 16.71 — 12 

VIENNA *PARIS*MILAN*ZUIICH )3 Shot '§48 -.15 

Euracontact ktl text + Travel- MJM Funds: 

Service. CaB Vienna +33-1-310 6319. Bdinen 04? -31 


ShOurGf 037—35 GoreCoS 10.05 —06 MdTxFrnlX27 — 17 Rodney Sqaure: EurpBt 1437 —.15 

SmCapn 1X14 +40 Growfhl 8X91 +.10 MidCapnl543 +36 Dtvlnp 13JM — OT FLMuBt 10JD — 43 

Borg Stott Fds: IdxEa 11JJ7 — 03 NewAmnZ733 * 09 Growttip 1X53 +36 FdVafflt BJJ3 +jn 

A»nGrA 1X13 — 53 IntmBdS 930 —DB N Aston 19OT — 95 InttEqp 1236—17 GIBrfflt 1537 —.17 

AsianGB 1X06—J3 tntGvtS 1X14—07 Now&tm203a — 36 Rorce Funds: GtOpBt 2041 —40 

GtabEqA 1243 — .06 InTTBdl 930—00 NwHrznnlX47 +.15 R»nnMu X42 — 01 GvScSf 947 —38 

GiobEaB 1116 —36 IntGovtt 10.14-37 NJTFn 1035-42 Eqtnc 533 . GrlnBt 10.19-04 

N& fixed mtl40 —16 IntSEa 1340— .IS NYTxFn 102S — 42 OTC 632 +35 HilncB? 1X09-39 

«5Munl 1X71—10 bttl£q5 1120—14 OTCn 1533 — M3 Rremlern X53 +J» invGaat 1X47 -—23 

UroKgSo P 1332 - Manogedl 1038 — .10 SdTctin 1932+40 Value tn 933 — 31 MaGvBtalXSI —.10 

tore Stan Inslt MmogedS 1X48—10 STBdn X9B — 02 Rosbmore Group: MqMufi I 15.90 —46 

AOCtryn 11.91 -36 PATFp 1044—22 STGton 470 — JH AmGas n 11 *7 + .1? NJMuBt 1X95 Ij? 

A^onEaMlJi — 32 STBUl 934 —34 SmCVl 1436 — 35 —M NyMuBt 16.97 —41 

Bal 9OT — 05 SmCctoVS1336 — 37 SpkGt 11.91—06 OTC Idxn17.13 -.12 PrMtB t 20.13—14 

EmGr 1X47 +40 SmCitoVI 1347 -37 Soecin 1X00-38 USGUrn 9.78 —.14 PtmTRH 11X95 —« 

EmMttt 1X39 —Jl Vsfoei 1144 —03 TxFree n 937—18 US Int n 9M —09 SedrBI 1X63 - w 

EqGr n 1234 +37 VataeS 1143 — W TxFfHYnl237 -.18 MO TF n 1036 — .15 SpEqBl 2X45 -Afi 

Fxancx 1046 -.12 PRARttyn 937—11 TRiftltt 1X46—12 VATFn 11.10—16 ftrtnSt 1744 -35 

Gt&jty 13-52 „ PootticUSx 948 —14 TkfiGIn 540 —32 RydxNova 1X47 — 38 TetGBt 12-38 * ;s 

GIFxin n 11OT— 14 PocfflcGrthx939— 08 US Int 548 —03 SBCWWln 932 — 32 TxExBt 1739-44 

HiYWtpr 1039— 17 POdlte Horizon: USLOno 1X31—12 SBCWWGr 1X34 — 23 UtiJBl 1449 I37 

InltSCn 1X60 —35 AoGrss 2530 +44 VATFn 1X81 —18 SBSF Funds; WlncBt 6.J6 —07 

InflEq 1X50 -37 CA7Fp 735 — 13 PrknrvTn 1133 +35 CBpGrn X02 , SmtthBroyShrviPdK 

RnttYId 9.79 —IB Ccplncs 1547 * 33 PrwSpl Prgsv. Convnbl nl2.l3 —JR PmPet 930—33 

VotueEqnll.94 — 08 USGv 945—00 DfvACTl 1348 -36 SBSFn 1538—02 Pnnllp sn —05 

SCValn 1135 + 37 RadflcsFdB GovlPrt 936 -38 SEI Punds: Prlnlllp 646 Vni 

Iuhfenkmpthl730 ^ AProsnt 1X14—02 IrtsTEx 1032 —21 Baiancp 1335 +37 SoGenOsea M35 — 36 

JuirCATFlXM— M Balance 1X25 -38 SP 100M 15.16 — W Bond npx 1047 —.15 SoG«nlri 2M3 — 11 

*lunMK® 1X78 +OT CATF 1X82 —27 TEPrt X99 — 1? Bdlndx pxlOOT — 12 Sodefy Fun£^ 

IWtBrtt , 1X24 —37 EaVd 1X71 -.02 PrttUMBS 937 —12 CdpGmx 12JD +.16 BateiSjOT —OS 

WhttdSarrt: Govtncfl 1044 — .11 Princar Funds: CorpDlnanl.98 — 31 DvrsfdSt 1X18 -34 

flecaxin 3148 — 00 ST CAB 1031 -38 BlOto 11.90 —OT GnMAp 946 —II GrSIk 1X14 

Discavry U39 — 06 Paine W etto an Banax 11.10 —.14 LtdVBdneta43 — .13 InttGr 1X64—36 

QuaHdn 27, (M —21 Asst Ac 11.97 _ CODACC 2X51 +JD SWGvnp 9.91 —03 Intmtac 944 Z06 

Shores n 8X41 -35 ATLAp 1X70 -46 EmsGr 2111+49 IntMti w 1036 — 18 irrvQI&j 9 74 - to 

CC Funds: BlueAp 1154 -JM Govtx 11.10 — lfl IntGvt no 935-37 Lid in 1044—81 

Btaityt p 1172 -JM CoTTA p 11.T6 -45 Growth 3036 +40 mtl p 1X81-36 OHReoSf 431 +10 

Fxdlnd p 103B —10 CopAAp 1X42 +.19 Managed 1245 — 01 EqVKnp»1174 — .19 OHTF injs — U 

OHTElp 1X70— .15 CmTcA 940 —JM TEBdX 1138—31 Eqindx npW39 -36 SpiGrSIk 1X30 +10 

Equ1tvRpl344 -36 DvGrA p 2039 — 11 Uttltties 1X1 1 +30 KSTFx 1X56—10 SptVrtSt 10.3 -OT 

FxdlncR P1X74— 10 EuGrAP 9JM +31 World 740 —12 MfdCGp 1137 +.10 Sritlm 1QOT -» 


MgMuAp 15.90 -46 BJCJ8PI 11.02+37 
MaMuAp1247 —41 CATFB 1048 —42 
JflMuAp 1X05 -47 EmGBt 2X57+46 
NyMuAp 1X97 — Jl Gvlnct 952—39 
PrMtAp 2043 —14 GrlnBt 1149 — JD 
SpEqAp 26.63 +36 HYTFt 930 —13 
PtTRA 15.95 — J05 HiYWt 842 —JJS 
UfllAp 1449 * 07 NatRsf 1542 —JO 
WlncAp 636 —02 TFBdBt 1038—43 
VVWFAp 142 _ Trust For fired Um 

mabBrnyShran B: GSP 9.90 

ABGrfll 2735+53 MSP 935—02 
ApprBt HOT— 31 TMP1996 944 — 32 

COAHuat 1539 —48 TurnerGE n!237 +jjs 
C onvBt 1X15— OT TwwtctyGV 1X37 — Jff 
Ovslrtt 846 — JJ7 280lGaotury! 

&ITOBJ 1437 —.15 Batlnvn 1X45 +.11 
FUWuBt 1033 — 43 Giftn 1X19 +.17 
FdVrtBt 833 - J)3 Growth n 2347 +.18 
15-f? — Heririvn 1041 +34 
«OpBt S41 — 40 IntlEqn 758 —10 
GvScSr 04/ —.08 LTBondn 930— .09 
GrinBt 10.1? -OT Select n 3936 -OT 


Bandldxnx938 —11 
Gwtti51knlI39 +.11 
S&P SOOn 1X46 —02 
UST All nx 935 —13 
Wesicare: 

AZTF 1030 —11 
BdgPl 1437 -J» 
LT Bd 931 —1! 
ModVal 1334 
OR TE 1630 —24 
Baltavl n 1849 —.13 
BasVll n 11.17 —.17 
Eqlnl n 1047 + .14 
GNArtA In 15.93 —13 
inffldl n 1048 —.04 
MIDCOIn 17.13 +46 
STGaVtl 1552 -33 
BollnvR 1848 —14 
GNMAR 15.93—13 
MiacoR 17.14 +46 
. STGovtR 1552 —03 


BaUnvn 1X45 +.11 Westwood Funds: 
Gittn 1X19 +.17 Bolins! 742 

Growth n 2347 +.18 Eqlnst 551 +.02 

Halnvn 1041 + OT Inffldl 10.03 —.12 

InflEq n 758 —.10 BatSvc 749 —01 

LTBondn 930—09 EqSvc 551 +33 

Sftfean 3936 -OT taffldSv 1038—12 
TvETTn 9.99 — 03 waSara Stair: 

TxElfttn J044 —|4 Growth n 948 - 36 
TxBLT n 1053 —.21 income 1X46 —.01 
UBren ?1M +32 InttGthn 1335—19 
USGvn 951 -JB W3EcwiPeani 
Value n 5.16—31 PennSOP 10.91 —OT 
Vista n 1036 -.19 PATxFr T13S — 16 


£32*. H, IISt5S fSygg* n S-l5+joi Ouaury 1Q35 —39 

*533 +OT USAA Group: I U.SGnu in SI —03 


SPEqfil 2035 +36 
StrtnBt 1744 —35 
TetGBt 1258 +.15 
TxExBt 1739 —34 
UtilBi 1449 +37 
WlncBt X46 —32 


AasvGmn2037 +33 WoadSnfltHn: 


Balanced nlX6i —10 
CABdn 10OT — 45 
Cormln 2157—43 
GNMA 1X1 d -JJS 
GaWn 851 —36 


WlnFltn 1X27—08 
WinGrta 1X98 —06 
WinMTP 951 —13 
WlnGItn 1359—11 
WmAGM 1X07 -JD 


SrUncn -32 ] Woodward Fds: _ 

Gnjfthn 1756 + 32 Bond 1X06 -OT 


MuTNAplX51 — 16 Muhfenkmpftil75D ^ APresnt 1XI4—JD 
MuVAApll58 — 41 MuirCA TF 1X24 — 46 Bounce 1X25 —JM 

MUWVAPT151 —40 MunNUGB 1X7® +33 CATF 1X0 —27 

CnpGBt 1336-31 MuflSnft 1844 —07 EaVol 1X71—02 

EmGrB t 1036 +44 Mutual Series: Govtncfl 1044 —.11 

GotdBl 658 -JB flecconn 3148 — 00 ST CAM 1031 -38 

GvMgBt* 638 —07 Discount 1330 —06 PotneWabbeR 
GvScBIx 9.63 —12 QuoHdn 97.M —21 AsslAp 11.97 

tfilrfflt 53B —36 Shares n 8X61—35 ATLAp 1640—46 

mtmBlx X62-.ll NCC Funds: BlueAp 1554 -36 

MOB dB 1X95-43 Equityl p 1172 — JM CoTTA p ll.Ti -45 

Secffit 1110—07 Fxdlnd p 1038 —10 CapAAp 1232 +.19 

TrtftBi 1340 -JJS OHTElp 1X70 —.15 CmTcA 950 — 04 
WoEqBt 1651 —41 EquitvRp!174 — JM DvGrAp 2039 —11 
WoGvB 1138—16 FxdlncR P1044 —10 EurGrAP 930 +31 

WoGrB 1X71—12 OH TER p 1037 —14 GJEnAt 1131 +JB 


Bond npx 1047 —.15 SoGenln 2333 — Ji 

Bdlndxpxlfl44 — 17 Society Funds; 
CdpGrnx 12OT +.16 Baience 950 —05 


CorpDlnpni.98 —31 

GNMAp 046 —It 
LWTBd nd043 —13 
SMGvnp 9.91 —33 
IntMti Dx 1036 —18 
IntGvt np 955 —37 
Inti p 1051 —36 
EqVKrenll74 —19 


DvrsfUSt 12.18 -OT 
GrSIk 10.14 
IrtttGr 1X64 — 36 I 
Intmtac 946 —.06 1 
InvQIBd 9,74 — JM 


tacStkn 1446 —01 Eqldx 11.15— OT 
Income nxl246 —14 Grval 1143 — OT 
]«0 —35 IniBd 10.19 —07 

NYBdn 1142-46 Intms 1048-34 

SttTSndn 9.02 _jn MIMun 1X18—17 
TxFta 9JJ —26 MunBd 1045 -.17 
JxEJTn 1X77 -41 Opaari 1108 +.16 
IffLTn 1331 -47 Working Assets: 

“- 04 CMGro 1132 *. IS 
VABd 1X99 —.23 Otlncx 1033 -.13 

WMGrn li« -.16 Giflai n.ll +OT 

CTMashm World Funds: 

W6-16 NwptTlfl 1X75 -JS 

|225n»-JS«-A2i VoniEP 17.04-44 
Equthr 2046 +.14 j VoniUVnllOT — 19 


OHRegSf M4I +.10 
OHTF 1X88—16 


EqlrtoxnpV539 —34 SrtGrSlk 1040 +!l0 
KSTFx 1056 —10 SpiVUSt 1X53 - JU 


946 -06 VABd 1X99—23 
9.74 -JM WMGrn JIM -.16 
044 -m UST Master 
MOT +.10 Asia 1046 —16 
1XW —16 EmaAira' 1036 —.12 
040 +.10 Equity 2046 +.I4 


TO OUR READERS IN ALBANIA 

Hand delivery is now available 
Just call: (42) 23 502 
"Independent Albanian Economic Tribune" 



WOToffi 1X96 - NDTxFrfm 937 — 35 

MufcnBt 848— IS NWMLNaihslar. 

MIM Funds: HiYklA 5JH -35 

Bdlncn 041-31 IncGrA 1031 +33 

SKlncn 1047 —03 MutKA 498 —06 

SikGrwn 11.69 +.16 NTL InsM Fds: 

StkApn 1644 +46 EAFE 1238—37 
MlMLtC Funds: Band 955 -36 


OEflAI 1131 +JH Pr oars VI 1X80 —18 
GflnAp 1X76— 37 PIFFwJtacnlOJM— . 10 


MWCGp 1157 +.10 
PAMunnpB33 -.16 
SmCappnlllO +.28 


Stklrra 10OT —32 
USGutin 1130 —08 
VgfStk 1x01 




AsstAJl IX^H —.02 
Fxdlnan 1X16 —.12 
Invl 1736 +.11 
MtaSecs 1045 — .11 
MMPrGtn I0OT —.01 
MMPxttiln 945—0* 


1518 +47 
10.90 —39 
1166—03 
1151 -JK 
1049 —02 
1237 +31 
1X62—03 


gFWjM M_WX95 ->16 Value ran 1050 —37 l^oundShn 14.71 — li 
GrihAp 30.92 +.04 PrnvhtvCflunset CopAnpxlXlV +.03 SAM SC 1253 +33 
HitaAp _197 — 37 EnduGM 1157 +.12 SIFE Trust x 352 — JM ! SAM Vol n 17U —in 

InsAp 1X07—13 insIGrth 1138 +.12 SlTRofe SoTTVlcnBo IQ30 07 

ImGAp 1047—13 SmCbpGrUUD +.19 Grthlnc 2102 +30 SoTrVImSi 1054 — 03 

MHtaA Wian-OT Prud5PCrt_730 + 3* Growth n \ln +Ti SpWSlk P54 

NTtaAp 11JS— 3* PrudentfefnmdK Intt 1537—43 snPtCash «39 — 31 


T.V ' JV 7 l' ’,-r 


Esaxt ft Guide Serree 
Tel/Fax. 0172 30207^0 


MSB Fdnx 1730-32 Nttlnd 1X62—03 
Macfcnnieem NatiansFuMb 
AtSGvA p 9,76 -OT AdiRJIA 3 957 — JD 
AmerFd pij.tl -.05 AdiRtTA n 9 X -,M 
! CAVamulO.il — .u; BaliCt 1137 


NYTxA px 1048 —24 
ROOFAD 1737 —.19 
STGvtAP 236 -31 
SmCcpA 1051 
USGvA p 945 — 30 
UUAp 941 +33 
Assfflf 1X03 
ATLBt 1634 —46 
BtaeOt 1X16 —.07 
ColTBt 11.17 -55 
CapABf 1252 +.19 


NIchA 1352 +.10 
NiehB 1X93 +.10 
Atfi At 952 -31 
BtadtGu 936— 33 
CAInAp 1051 —16 
Eq«Ap 1432 +33 
EqlncA 1457 +JH 
FtOiA/ 1149 — JD 
GtabAp 1437 —54 
GIAstA 155 —31 
GIUtAf 14.19—31 


1352 +.10 Tax Freer 
1193 +.10 USGov 
952 -31 SnaasBic 


, T 5 3 Jf roen .!- 8S ~ Slogesoodi Funds 
17SGOV 1058— JD AsetAIC 1H59 — 09 


P54 r5S Union I me 
959-31 Baton p 


CATFIn 1X15-37 
BrtTrn 1038 . CATF 1060-34 

CCtaGrip 1256 +35 CrpStkn 3X00 —JO 
CgrtrT 1259 + 36 Dvsln 11.15-32 
InGST 1024 —08 GNMA I13S —10 
taGrBlnp 1044 — 38 Gttllnc 14.96 — JM 
’P/ 1 - ]J USGovt 1535 -.17 
InTEBtfT nio.69— 13 VKG 1065 —JD 
SunbEdTn 10.21 -.14 StafflSsh invsi: 


CrpStkn 3X00—37 United Funds: 

Dvsln 11.1S —32 Accuinumv750 - JM 
GNMA HOT— 10 Band 6.20-37 
Gttllnc 14.96 — JM Conti ne 21,61 

USGovt 1535 -.17 GOUCM 9*5 
VRG 1065 —33 GvtSec 553 —06 
lafliSsli Invsi: Hilncll 449 — jk' 


tar^ro 12OT + 32 1 Wright Funds: 
taJMgdm 4.99 —06 Curln 1050 -.12 
— - ,7 GvCtan 1X48 — 16. 
'IHE- M! ’-■ 5S ,n 8K=h 1351 -» 

LTTC 9.11 —J2 Jrflior 1750 +OT 
Mortn 8.77 —39 NearBdn 1X57 —08 
N Y YE 854 —13 QutCor 1253 +35 
Po*fl£uro 838—08 SeiBChn 1495 +35 
tnnraxEx ;ot -34 Tot Ret n 1X52 —IS 
Jnonlmr: Ygcktmn np 952 — 30 

Brtonp 1133 — OT YamGlab 946 —.13. 

IA0I +35 ZwtoS Funds 
IntBd 1057 —08 StrptA 12J1 +3? 
L MGgv An9J8 — JD ZSAppA 1453 +33 
.XJSJKP pto -+- 05 ZSMAA 1X29 -OT 
Jnlted Funds 25 GvA px1XT6 —38 

Araimultsy/jp +34 ZSPAp 1230 +.10 
Band 6.20 —07 StrafB 1X71 +37. 
Carttae 5151 +36 ZSApoB 1443 +33 
Go»Gvt 9*5 _ 25 MMB 1157 -31 ' 

GvtSec 553 -05 ZSGvBx IM3 -37 
Hilncll 440-JJ6' ZSP3 It- >9 -J» 


it*'" ' 


GrEq p 1537 * 35 
IntBd 1057 —08 
UWlGovAn938 — JD 
YWIptn 1331 —05 


*|i: ■■ 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 7, 1994 


Page 1 1 


■>( . : 


-.irr 






V.'.-. 
A" ' 


'—.6 ■ 


• ifc - 

'-»**? 






Newjntemalioreai Bod lsn^7 

Compiled by Ujurenqe Desvifettes 


Issuer 




Amount 

(mflOons) 


Floating Rato Hates 


Banco Naaood de 
Mexico- 


$100 


Catsse Centrde de 
Cnkfrt Immobflier 

^Morgan Stanley 


$250 


Slat 

% 


1996 

1997 


Price 

Price 

end 

week 

Terra* 




100 

— 

Over 6 -month Libor. Noncoifabfo. Fees OJ09L Denominofions 
510,000. (Kidder, Peabody.) 

99.74 

. — 

Ovtir 3-month U*tf- Noneotoie. fare 0.15V (CS firtf 


Group 


Nationwide Building 



Boston) 


99.765 - 


Over 3-month Libor. Noecnloble. Fees 0.175%. {Morgan 
Stanley Int i.) 

— Over 3/norrfh Libor. Cribble at par from 1995. Foes not 


■" . 1 

— 







debased DenMMWHon £100^00. goring Brotheiv) 

"" 

■ . ABB Int 1 Finance 

C$180 

2003 

Ojo 

100 

— 

Bcbw 3-frxmth Bonken Acopfonces'. Miriflwn intoiesi 6%, 
mawnum 8.85%. Nonariobfe. Fees 050S. (Devtsdse Bar*.} 


Ontario Hydro 

C$1,000 

1999 

— 

99.64 

— 

Inferast wifi bo the 3-morah Bankers Acceptances' rat*. Non- 
enflabfe. Fees 0.IS*. (Wood Gundy.J 


. FbMtCoupons 








jli"' fc :»! # ;• 

African Devebpment 
Bank 

$500 

2004 

6Vt 

99 J5 

96,40 

NonoritoUe. fees OJ2S3&. Denomnmons $10,000. (Sofomcm 
Dratheii fret) 


HWroetectrica AKcura 

$170 

1999 

8% 

99^78 

. 

Noncalable. Fees 114%. (lahman Brotherc 1ml) 

■ 

Irtebat 

$200 

2004 

6% 

99 J4 



■ - r 




Sachs foil] 

i-'- 

Ispat Mexicana 

$175 

2001 

10% 

100 

— 

Satnionniftey. CoBabtoat 103^58 in 1999. Few 2H%. (CS fitri 
Boston.] 


General Electric 

Capital Corp. 

DF250 

1997 

5 Vi 

100.69 

9975 

Reoffered at 99^4. Noncaflabfe. Fees 1% (ABN-Amro.) 

LJ ;„V ; 

De Nationate 
Investeringsbank 

C$125 

1997 

6 

101 J95 

— 

Beofferad at 100295. NoncxxUafafe. Fees 1M% (ScstiaM- 
cLead.) 


Ford Gedit Europe 

Y 10,000 

1997 

1(535 

101J25 

— 

Semmuaty. Reoffered at par, Nonadbbie. Fees not ris- 
dosed. Denomnaticms 100 rnaCon yen. [Goldman Sods Inti) 

■ - -- 

' ' ■- IGnki Nippon Railway 

Y 10,000 

1998 

3.35 

101325 

_ 

Noncoflobls. Fees !H%. [Mrtiubishi Fi nonce Inti) 


Korda Nfippon Railway 

710,000 

1999 

3^0 

101775 

— 

NoncaBabte. Fees 1N%. Denomtnctioro 10 raXon yen. (Mitsu- 
bishi Trust fell) 

t * . 

Korea Development 
Bank 

v 20,000 

2004 

AJO 

100 

— 

NonceBobie. Fees 0325%. Denonsnattora 10 mtHton ym. 
(Bank of Tokyo Capitol Mortals.) 

■. .'. - 

Equity-Linked 







AjT’.-j; ■ ^ “ : 

Bums Philp Treasury 
Europe 

$125 

2004 

open 

100 

— 

Semiannuof coupon indcaiad at 5 to 5)6%. Noncdtobfe. 
ConvertMe at on expeded 17 to 21% premium. Fees 2W%. 
Terms to be set Mach 10. (Morgai Sttmley fell.) 

r ■ . • 

Cosmo Oil 

$300 

1998 

1 

100 



•'8 - . _ 

to . 


able into company's shares at an expected 2 16% premium. 
Fees 2K%. Terms to be set March 9. (Nomura Inti.) 

"• " - -• 

Empresas ICA 

$145 

2004 

5 

TOO 

— 

Nonedfabie. ConvertMe into company's ADfc of $33.15 per 
ADR, a 20% premium Fees 215%. (Baring Seairitim.) 


Hitachi Zosen 

$200 

1998 

1% 

100 

— 

NoncaBable. Each SlOjOOO note wish two vwrants exerris- 
abte into company’s shares at an expected 7A% premiun. 
Fees 2V4% Terms to be set March 8. (Nomura Int’lj 

■■ 

Japan Radio 

$200 

1998 

1% 

100 

— 

Nanariabie. Each $10,000 note with two werronts sxerds- 
able into company’s shares cfl 2J030 yen per share and at 
10570 yen per share. Fees 2%%. (hflrio Europe) 


Nippon Denro Ispat 

$125 

2001 

3 

100 

— 

Noncalable. Convertible as 67 rupees per share and at 31.37 
rupees per dolor. Fees 236% freeased from $100 elon, 
(S.G. Warburg) 


Tobu Railway 

$400 

1998 

1% 

1 00 

— 

Noncalable- Each $10JXX) note with two warrants exercis- 
able into company's does or an expected 235% premium. 
Fees 234%. Terms to be set March 7. (Ycunoichi Inti Europe.) 

■ '••• : 

Tomoku Company 

$100 

1998 

1 

100 

— 

Noncalable. Each $10,000 note with two warrants exercis- 
able into compcmy's shares at ai expected 236% premium. 
Fees 236%. Terms to be set Mmth 8 . {Fftfro Europe) 


Tokyo Bedron Ltd. 

Ff 1,100 

1998 

1% 

100 

— 

Nonateobfe. Each 10,000-franc note with one warrant exer- 
rivUm into company's shoe* at 1444 yen per share and <* 
18.35 yen per frtmc Fees 26%. (Nomura fetl) 










SHORT COVER 


Gulf States Try to Reverse Oil Slide 

ABU DHABI (AFP) — Gulf Arab oil ministers agreed Sunday to 
contact other producers to drum up support for action to reverse a slide in 
■ crude prices. 

Ofl Minister Said ibn Ahmad ash Shanfari of Oman will resume a 
mission outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, 
while OPEC President Abdullah ibn Hamad Attiyah will contact other 
members of the cartel 

“According to my information. Shanfari wfll tell non-OPEC states that 
a Gulf proposal for joint output cuts is still in force and will likely seek 
Finn pledges on how mud* they are wiling to reduce,” said a source close 
to the miles after the ministers had met in the Saudi dty of J e d dah . 

SMH Hints at Swatcbmobile Price 

ZURICH (Reuters) — The “SwatchmobDe” car that Mercedes-Benz 
AG and the Swiss watchmaker SMH SAplan to build will costless than 
15,000 Swiss francs ($10,400), according to a published interview given by 
Nicolas Hayek. „ . . . 

Asked if a price of 15,000 francs for the small futuristic car was 
realistic, he replied: “That’s even a little too high." 

He said it remained his aim to present the car at the 1996 summer 
Olympics in Atlanta, where SMH would act as the official timekeeper. 

Last week, Helmut Werner, chairman of Mercdedes-Benz, said the 
price of the car likely would be less than 20,000 Deutsche marks 
(S 11,7001 

Yuan To Be Convertible by 2000 

BEIJING (AP) — China’s currency, the yuan, will be made convertible 
within six years, a finance official announced on Saturday. 

As a step toward convertibility, China on Jan. 1 abolished a special 
currency used by foreigners. A spokesman for the central bank, the 
People’s Bank of China, said the central government also would be 
relaxing foreign-exchange controls over foreign trade this year as another 

the second quarter of this year, the Chinese yuan will be allowed to 
float on a new interbank foreign exchange market that replaces the 

CU Thece^fbaSSa)ntmue to exert some KffltrolOTCTt^ma^tto 
Vj ensure that the exchange rate does not fl uctu^ too wildN. “The flotahm 
* has to be somewhat controlled, considering China s reality. the ^pofcS" 
man said, “especially when our fiscal and monetary policies cannot fully 
regulate the economy.” 

Dynamics Chief Plans to Step Down 

Falls Church, Virginia (Bloomberg) - Tire General EbrnamiraCMp. 
chairman, William Anders, who engineered a 

tractor battled reductions in defense spending, will step down this spring, 

tobny back asm^ 

limUHon Snmon shares, declared a two-for-one stock spbl and raised 

i.. 17 nwreni 



Mr. Anders, W, sami* Dynamics” in the past three years. 

STS? aSSn*-** ha^SHT missiles and elecdoni* 
business as ’well as Cessna Aircraft Co. 


■ - 


business as wen a* j — 

Buffett Lifts Salomon Stake to 19% 

NEW 

company controlled^ Warren percent from about 14 

3 clearance to rase i is stake m Salomon as 

the period after it was sham by ^ remains on Salomon’s board, 

has stepped dpw ^ m ^ d Sents for the purchase w*re filed wuk 
A mistake was “ The purchase was disclosed 

the Securities and ^J^Hn^SdeelectromcaUy to the SEC after the 
Friday in two parts- A first half of the shares purchased A 

S^ot’S^umslaie:. 

hafe needs to more ^ “um?y cmenUjj 

century, Steel ^ric tons of steel a year. (Reuters) 

produces about 15 million Fidelity Investment Co~ said in an 
Edward Johnson, c ^^5 £ -^j ews week magazine that the US. slock 
interview to appear in ibis™***** ^ ^ or four years as it does mw. 

market may not appear as h^tnym ^ pnce& ^ 0 f renewed 
Mr. Johnson cited a market for Ms theory. ( Reuters j 

inflation and lost vigor m toe non 


BONDS: 

Dollar Is Key 

Continued from Page 9 - 
of the projected growth won’t hap- 
pen” if the rise in long-term rates is 
sustamed. 

By the end of last week, 10-year 
yields in France were 75 basis 
points over the recent low, in Spain 
77 basis points, in Italy 98, in Brit- 
ain 1 16 and, by comparison, 128 
basis pants in the United States. 

Despite agreement that the dol- 
lar’s exchange rate plays a role in 
enabhgg European bond prices to 
move independently of develop- 
ments in New York, analysts fall 
out over whether this deconpling 
requires a stronger dollar versus the 
Deutsche mark or a weaker one. 

“The level of the dollar will de- 
termine the tuning of the decou- 
pling.” said Jan Loeys at J. P. Mor- 
gan & Co. in London. “The 
stronger the dollar is, the more dif- 
ficult it will be for the Bundesbank 
to cut interest rates.” 

He acknowledged that last 
week's dosing of the dollar at 
1.7190 Deutsche marks meant that 
“the dollar is not terribly strong” 
But he saw the Bundesbank con- 
strained by fears that a rate cut just 
after announcing a 20.6 percent in- 
crease in money supply growth 
could send t be mark into a free-fall 
against the dollar. 

Giles Keating at CS Fust Boston 
in London, however, said a strong 
dollar was the key to uncoupling 
the bond markets. 

Anticipation that the dollar wiD 
rise — as most believe it wfll as 
interest rates rise in the United 
States and fall in Europe — means 
that investors in European bonds 
need to be offered a return at least 
equal and probably higher than on 
U-S. bonds to cover die currency 
loss when the dollar does advance, 
said Mr. Keating 

Once the big surge in the dollar’s 
value is completed, he added, “in- 
vestors will be more comfortable 
with yields in Europe lower than in 
the United States because at that 
poinuhe Deutsche mark would be 
perceived as having some upward 
potential against the dollar.” 

Regardless of the analysis, the 
message is the same: Do not be a 
hero, stay away from the market 
until a convincing uptrend is under 
way. 

Although the wildest Selling 
from the deleveraging of hedge 
funds is believed to be finished, 
analysts said slower-moving play- 
ers such as bond mutual funds 
could be forced to play catch-up, 
either through the withdrawal of 
investors or through asset alloca- 
tors’ decisions to repggjle exposures 
following the debacle. 

“Mutual funds are not as quid: 
to read” noted Michael Cowan at 
Morgan Stanley Asset Manage- 
ment in London. “They don’t un- 
wind ove rnig ht." 

At the same time. Mr. Cowan 
concurred with Alain Leclair at 
Paribas Asset Management in Paris 

that “this is the kind of setback that 

long-term investors like pension 
funds and insurance companies 
sbonld use to increase invest- 
ments.” 

There is wide accord that the 
most promising braid markets are 
Italy and Spain. 


China Plans Some Analysts See Fed Move This Week 
To Upgrade 
Car Plants 


Compiled by Ov $uff From Dupmdm 

BEIJING — China will slop li- 
censing new auto plants until the 
year 2000 and allow small car man- 
ufacturers to “wither in the face of 
competition,” the official China 


Daily said. 
This is i 


part of a plan to prepare 
the country’s automobile industry 
to compete with a flood of cheap 
imports when China joins the Gen- 
eral Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade, the newspaper said. 

No new manufacturing projects 
will be allowed because too many 
plants are making small numbers 
of low-quality automobiles, the re- 
port said. More than 120 factories 
now assemble vehicles in China, 
No more projects assembling ve- 
hicles with imported compleie- 
knock-down components will be 
authorized. Instead, factories de- 
veloping new cars themselves, or 
with foreign partners, will be fa- 
vored. 

Small companies will be allowed 
to go bankrupt while public funds 
will underwrite the expansion of 
larger factories, China Daily said. 
PSA Peugeot CitroSn SA plant in 
Wuhan and Volkswagen AG’s fac- 
tories in Shanghai and Jilin are 
among the factories which will re- 
ceive the funds, the newspaper 
said. 

The plan calls for producers to 
concentrate on developing inexpen- 
sive models that the Chinese can 
afford, such as vehicles built by joint 
ventures with the Japanese carmak- 
ers Suzuki Motor Co. and Daihatsu 
Motor Co, China Daily said. 

China produced 1.3 million mo- 
tor vehicles last year, 20 percent 
more than in 1992. The country is 
expected to produce 3 million vehi- 
cles a year try 2000, the paper said. 
By comparison. U.S. consumers 
buy about 10 milli on cars annually. 

Licensing and tariffs barriers are 
bong lowered as China struggles to 
join GATT. On Jan. 1, tariffs on 
small cars were cut from 150 per- 
cent to 1 10 percent, and for larger 
can from 220 percent and 180 per- 
cent. (Bloomberg, AFP) 

Swiss Banks 
Are Encouraged 
To Open Books 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BERNECK, Switzerland — The 
Swiss National Bank president, 
Markus Lusser, said Sunday that 
the country's regional banks should 
open their books to the public to 
improve their sagging credibility. 

Mr. Lusser recommended that 
banks, while continuing to with- 
hold any information about indi- 
vidual depositors, publicize their 
own audited accounts, thereby giv- 
ing depositors and shareholders 
ample information to decide 
whether the banks are in sound 
financial health. 

The cautious information policy 
so prevalent today makes no sense 
Mr. Lusser said. He added, “A bank 
that’s good doesn't need to hide.” 

Swiss regional banks, which rely 
primarily on small business loans, 
mongages and small deposits, have 
been hard Ml by recession. The 
regional banking sector also was 
shaken by the collapse of one bank. 
Spar- & Leihkasse Thun, in 1991 
and there has been a wave of merg- 
ers and takeovers, sometimes to 
bail out banks in difficulty. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


Camp tied fa itur Stuff From Dfyucha 

NEW YORK —With inflation jitters mount- 
ing, some analysts said the Federal Reserve 
Board could move this week to push up interest 
rates and thus slow the expansion of credit. 

The credit markets are focusing on this ques- 
tion amid a lack of other developments expeci- 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

ed this week. The only data due with dear 
market-moving potential are the Fed’s so- 
called Tan Book report on economic activity, 
due for release on Wednesday, and February 
retail sales, scheduled fra Friday. 

CS First Boston went out on a limb to predict 
that the Fed would raise its discount rate on 


Monday. The rate, currently 3 percent, is 
charged on Fed loans to commercial banks. 

The central bank engineered a rise in the 
federal funds rate, which is what banks charge 
each other on overnight loans, on Feb. 4. It was 
the fust time the Fed had pushed that rate up in 
five years; the central bank’s target for ' L now is 
325 percent. The Fed has not raised the dis- 
count rate; which it directly sets, since 1989. 

“We think they’re going to go sooner rather 
than later,” said Matthew Alexy. a government 
bond market strategist at CS First Boston. 
“This gradualist approach is gnawing away at 
the market This market isn't going to gain any 
stability until they go again." 

Some other major firms also saw quick ac- 
tion. “Certainly, f think next week,” said Elias 


BikhazL an economist at Deutsche Bank Secu- 
rities Inc. who believed the Fed might increase 
the Fed funds rate by a quarter poinL 

Ron Connors, head trader at Bear, Stearns & 
Co. also said the Fed would move soon, noting 
that severe weather should have kept the figures 
released Friday on job increases at a lower 
leveL 

Among the skeptics were Stephen Roach. 
chid 1 economist at Morgan Stanley & Co. 

The Fed's “business is conducting monetary 
policy to achieve broader goals” of fighting 
inflation and supporting growth, said Mr. 
Roach, a former red staffer. They aren't in the 
business of getting caught up in the movements 
and frenzy of the Financial markets.” 

(Bloomberg, Knight-Ridder) 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, March 7-12 


A schedule t* tins week's economic ana 
tiriAnajl events, compiled for the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune Dy Bloomberg Busi- 
ness News 


Asia-Pacific 

• March 7 Tokyo PnmelAmaJarMorh 
htro Hosotawa will speak on the govern- 
ment's fecal 1994 budget and his adimv 
tstratfon. 

Tokyo Federation of Bankers Associa- 
tion of Japan to announce bank deposits 
and lending figures. 

• Me rc h 8 Bel) ng Chinese People's 
Poiwcai Consultative Conference. 
Ca mingi wspmirrl Hong Kong Aircraft 
Engineering, Harbor Ring International 
Holdings. 

• March 8 Tokyo U.S. Secretary of 
State Warren m. Christopher arrives tor 
three-day visit. 

Tokyo Bank of Japan Governor Yasushi 
Uleno to give news conference. 

• M ar c h to Canberra February em- 
ployment dal a. 

Earnings expected Cathay Pacific Air- 
ways. 

• March 1 1 Beiftng U.S. Secretary of 
Stas Warren M. Christopher arrives to 
hold talks with Chinese leaders on the 
extension of most-favored-natton trading 
status. 


Europe 


February consumer price index. Fore- 
cast Up 0.3 percent m month, up 2.1 
percent m year. 

Frank**! February final cool of Svlng. 
Foreca s t : Up 0.3 percent In month, up 3.3 
percent in year. 

Frankfurt January retail safes. Forecast 
No change. 

Frankfurt German January producer 
price index. Forecast Up 0.5 percent In 
month, up 0.2 percent in year. 

Parts French January K-3 money sup- 
ply. Forecast Up 1 £ percent in month. 
Madrid Spanish February unemploy- 
ment rata 


• March ? Brussel* Meeting of the 

European Monetary institute to review EU 
monetary cooperation. 

London January consumer credit index. 
Forecast £300 mBon for the month. 
Arts Bank of France securities repur- 
chase agreement . 

Plate Bank of France Treasury bis auc- 
tion 

Parte December balance of payments. 

• M ar c h 8 Frankfurt Western Germa- 
ny February unemployment rats. Fore- 
case Up 25.000. 

Frankfurt Fourth-quarter gross domes- 
tic product Forecast Down 05 percent 
Frankfurt Bundesbank to call tor bids on 
securities repos 

London January manufacturing output 
Forecast Up 0 3 percent in month, up i £ 
percent in year. 

London January industrial production. 
Forecast Up 0.4 percent in month. 
Earnings expected Valeo. 

■ Mereh 8 Frankhnt Fourth round of 
public sector wage talks lasting two days. 

Earning! expected Fokker, BAT Indus- 
tries, Cadbury Schw e ppes. Independent 
Newspapers, fiTZ Corp. 

• March 10 Frankkst Wage talks in 
the construction sector. 

Earnings i mped e d Heineken, Lafarge 
CoppCe. 

■ March 11 London December visi- 
ble trade. Forecast £1 billion deficit. 
Paris February consumer price index. 
Forecast Up 02 percent in month. 

Paris Febnjary consumer price index. 
Forecast Up 03 percent In month, up 1 .7 
percent In year. 

EarningB expected ABN Amro Bank. 

Amerl 


Gross on charges of conspiracy, bank 
fraud aid msappBcatlon ot (unde. 

San Jose, CaBtornla Closing arguments 
In Intel Corp.'s copyright infringement 
auk against AMD me 
Washington Productivity and costs 
for the first quarter. 

San Jose, Cafitontia Semiconductor In- 
dustry Association scheduled to release 
Ks book-to-Mf rate for February. 
Hannoafflo, Mexico Deadline for Ford 
Motor Co. SA to reach a new labor con- 
tract with workers at the Hermcrafio planL 
Rio ds Janeiro The Central Bank ex- 
pected to auction its benchmark Central 
Bank Bonds Outlook: Rates to rise from 
49.85 percent. 

Caracas Administration expected to 
present tax package to Congress. 
ottswa December estimates of labor in- 
come. 

New York Deadline tor R.H. Macy & Co 
to file an outline of its bankruptcy plan. 
New York Packard-Beil Electronics Inc. 
scheduled to announce new models in its 
laptop computer line. 

Cambridge. Mass ac husetts Continental 
Cablevision customers get access to In- 
ternet. 


Gen- 
esee Corp., Paramount Communications. 
• March 7 W ellin gton January con- 
sumer credit Forecast: Up SS.7 biUton. 
Buenos Alraa Talks between Iberia and 
the Argentine gov ernm ent or the future of 
Aerollneos Argentines set to resume. 
BaBas Opening of the trite of former 
Southmark Funding Presktent and San 
Jacinto swings Association officer Joe 



Telephony '94 Conference fea- 
tures products from leading makers of 
PBX systems. tike Northern Telecom Ltd. 
and l_M. Ericsson Telephone Co., and 
computer makers, such as American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co., which makes 
both types ot products. 

W asHkigto n American Petroleum Insti- 


tute Issues Its weekly report on U.S- petro- 
leum socks, production, imports and re- 
finery utilization. 

Earnings expected H.J Heinz Co., 
Health Management Systems, 
e March 9 Washington January 
wholesale trade. 

Washington Federal Reserve releases 
its "Beige Book" report on economic ac- 
tivity. 

Mexico City The central bank an- 
nounces the results of iis weekly auction 
of government securities Outlook: Short- 
term Treasury bills to rise from 9.01 per- 
cent 

Mnrioo City February inflation. Outlook: 
Between 05 percent and 0.8 percent 
Caracas Central Bank is expected to 
hold Its weekly auction of 91-day zero 
coupon bonds. Outlook: Yields expected 
to decline. 

Washington U.S. Department ot Energy 
issues its weekly report on U.S. petroleum 
siocks, production, imports and refinery 
utilization. 

Arlington. Virginia The American Gaa 
Association releases its weekly U.S. natu- 
ral gas inventory report, 
e March 10 Washington Itetial week- 
ly state unemployment compensation in- 
surance cfamts. 

BncrfHa Brazil likely to announce It is 
seeking a stand-by loan from Internation- 
al Monetary Fund to close Brady bond 
negotiations. 

Sae Paulo Inflation tor firsi week of 
March. Outlook: Up from 38.14 percent. 
Ottawa January new motor vehicle sales 
report. 

New York Bankruptcy court scheduled 
to approve efisdosure statement lor Inte- 
grated Resources Inc. 

Earnings expected Dayiorv Hudson 
Corp., Hudson's Bay Co., Nation el Semi- 
conductor Corp. 

e March 11 Washington February re- 
taii sales. 

Ottawa February labor force survey. 
Ottara January housing price Index. 
Houston Baker Hughes Inc. reteeses its 
weekly survey ot the number of active oil 
and gas drilling ngs in the United States 
and Canada. 


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Renault Privatization 
Not a Priority for Paris 

Reuters 

PARIS — Renault, the French 
car and trade manufacturer, may 
not be privatized this year, accord- 
ing to officials in Prone Minister 
Edouard BaDadur’s office, strength- 
ening speculation the sale will be 
delayed until at least mid- 1995. 

Previously, officials predicted 
the sale for this year. But more 
recently official sources said il 
could be delayed bv the slump in 

the car market and the risk of polit- 
ical trouble. The strong trade 
unions at Renault say they will do 
all they can to block the sale. 


Euromarts 
At a Glance 


Eurobond Yields 



Mor.4Fab2S 

YrMetiTrlBw 

UA. A last term 

nJi 

ut 

tM 

* 2 t 

U 6 .s,nxtra ttrm 

586 

S74 

68 6 

U5 

DA. !• start tara 

£21 

&.U 

Us 

488 

Posed! start to! 

«Js 

669 

686 

626 

FreocS francs 

648 

UB 

6 te 

£87 

mXtan Brt 

US 

LU 

U4 

7.91 

Daeiitikraaa 

659 

641 

6J9 

620 

SwedUtitaBBS 

U5 

7J7 

7J5 

7HS 

EOJUoaatenn 

680 

662 

681 

6.11 

ECU, nefes term 

M3 

623 

IM 

581 

Coe.! 

72D 

7JE 

726 

UB 

Aa.1 

728 

692 

72S 

*5* 

Hi S 

6J7 

687 

W9 

£99 

Ye* 

US 

329 

143 

387 


Source! Luxembourg 5 lock Exchange. 

Weekly Sales mct.3 

primary Mirtte 

CM* esniefeor 

I NMI I IW 

SMgK U27D fifflJC 417, ID 2,13130 

Csmrt 302) 240 54fti0 120.10 

FRHs 22170 KB MUD 1JSU0 

ECP JSJ4340 197720 11017.10 &731J0 

Total tfwnnn 4375001174930 f.74k20 


CaM Euraetear 

S Hons I fees 
StraltiMi WlteO 344000 »/UM) 333300 

Cwnrt *4110 51 U6 JJ&I-S) 1ASE.W 

F Rill 6,1400 Z547J0 2M34J0 4J4U0 

ECP 7441J0 9,15730 00940 21417 AJ 

Total 23AU0 34JQ220 027450 6142S40 

Source: Eurocteor, Cadet. 


Libor Rate* 

l^Boetti 

3 -monft 

Mar. 6 
Htet 

UiS 

3** 

M 

4% 

DaetxdM mark 

tn 

5 W14 

» 

Pnsdiferitoi 

5V. 

SV. 

53/16 

Pffiodi fnzsc 

67/14 

w* 

68/16 

ECU 

6 fe 

6 % 

6 W 

Yes 2*6 ism 

Sources: Umh Bank, Reuters. 

25/16 


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Page 12 


International Herald Tribune 


A Special Report 


Monday, March 7 , 1994 


Fashion 


f pU- ' 






A You tli quake Shapes the Future, 
But What Is There to Wear Now? 


By Suzy Menkes 

P ARIS — High fashion reduced to 
shrouds and shreds? Boiled wool 
sweaters as lumpy as a bowl of por- 
ridge? Dresses as sheer as a net cur- 
tain or os soft as a nightgown? Hemlines in free 
fall or hiked thigh high? No wonder that ordi- 
nary women — and even fashion pros — in- 
quire in bewilderment what is going on? 

The answer is simple: We are going through 
a youthquake as overwhelming as the shake-up 
in society that changed the landscape of fash- 
ion in the swinging 1960s, or even back in the 
roaring 70s. 

The” change is not just about new styles and 
silhouettes, because such dictates are no longer 
accepted by modem women. But there is no 
denying fashion's altered stale in the minds or 
a new generation of designers — the children 
of the 1960s — whose parents were filled with 
optimism Tor a new deal in a better, brighter 
world. 

The spirit of the new fashion ranges from the 
quiet and poetic clothes sent out by young 
European designers, especially from "Belgium 
and London, to the harsh, angry clothes spat 
out by a disaffected international fashion un- 
derground. Whatever way you look at the gen- 
tle wrap-and-tie outfits, the bias-cut and apron 
dresses, the soft pajama pants or hard-edged 
plastic clothing, the message is clear: Aspiru- 
tional career clothes for women who wjm to 
take on the world are over. 

The challenge of the 1990s is not to fight a 
fashion movement that reflects a fundamental 
shift in values and attitudes that may not be 
felt fully until the new millenium. It is how to 
adapt the new mood to the needs of women 
customers who are inevitably faced with dress- 
ing for the world as it is. not as it might one day 
be. 

To pul ir more bluntly: What i» a woman 
with money to spend on designer clothes going 
to wear for the winter season that will lead us 
into the second half of the IWK? 

“There is definitely a revolution " says Jo- 
seph Eitedgui. whose stores in London. Paris 
and New York are at fashion's cutting edge. 
“Young people absolutely rebel against any- 
thing which is established. 

“The avant garde designers are gelling more 
so. And when you look at the new designers' 
images, you realize that minimalist clothes 
need a lovely face. I have to think of how- 1 can 
translate it for all my clients." 

Ettedgtd claims that “whatever happens in 


fashion, there is always u development which 
follows up." A parallel is drawn by several 
retailers with Jhe situation in the 1960s. when 
the sharp, geometric lines of the space-age 
clothes were first rejected by shocked consum- 
ers as only Tor the young, and then absorbed as 
simple A-line dresses and coats that could be 
worn by everybody. 

Vincent Knoll, vice president and director of 
couture at Saks Fifth Avenue sees a parallel to 
the new names jostling the Paris ready-to-wear 
fashion calendar with the early 1970s. when 
“suddenly a bunch of names cropped up and 
we went to see them.'* Then, as now. fashion 
had become predictable and was suddenly 
shaken up in a way that at first seemed unset- 
tling and confusing. 

TTie overwhelming difference between the 
1960s and the present is that then the new wave 
clothes were cheap and could be bought by a 
generation that coveted the new styles. Now. as 
Caroline Collis of Browns in London says, 
young designers are pasionate about good fab- 
rics. That makes the clothes affordable only by 
women who cannot understand them. 

But fashion change in the 1990s is not just 
about cutting shoulder pads down to size. It is 
about women abandoning the tailored jacket 
that has been a working armor for the last 
decade, and wearing instead a simple dress that 
laps the body naturally. 

Giorgio Armani, famous for his jackets and 
pants suits, underlined the change with a winter 
Emporio hue that majored on em pir e dresses. 

It has been reinforced in the Puis season by 
Dries Van Noten's soft dresses in faded-flower 
prints, by Junya Watanabe’s blanket-checked 
pinafores and by the fact that the f ashio n 
groupies are favoring the long dress. (More on 
the weekend Paris shows, page 18.) 

Mariot Chanel, the husband-and-wife team 
who make ami-aggressive clothes that wrap, 
drape and tie. believe that there is a way to 
make unstructured clothes palatable for wom- 
en who are dubious of the idea of paying a 
designer priee “to wear a rag on your back.” 

“In the 1980s. one fashion was wom by 
people of eveiy age." says Olivier Chatenet. 33. 

“Then there was the beige wave and it didn’t 
work for a lot of the women who have the 
money to spend." he admits. His partner. Mi- 
chelle. believes that there are ways of giving a 
woman structure without redesigning the body 
and the silhouette with the power jacket that 
Mariot Chanet describe as “social protection.” 

A generation of women who have not had to 
fight for a position in the workplace — or are 
disilhisisoned with the concept of the superwo- 




man-work ine-mom — may embrace fashion's 
new image. Bui what about those women who 
are in a corporate career? 

“1 think we are going to get hack to more 
structure.” says Susan Falk, president and 
chief executive officer of Henri Bendel. “F.v- 
erything is now soft — all the fall fabrics like 
alpaca and wool boucle. But we are dealing 
with a woman who has logo to work. I am not 
sure that she feels comfortahle with drapey 
clothes — except for evening and weekend 
wear." 

For Rifat Ozbek. *40. the Turkish-born, Brit- 
ish-raised designer who brought his show to 
Paris for the first time this season, fashion in 
the 1990s is about attitude. 


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“It’s more relaxed — the way you pm it 
together and throw things on,” he said of his 
shearling jackets layered over cropped sweat- 
ers and loose shuts, or the brief skirts worn 
with pants, lopped with a fez. 

“But fashion has to get off from the end of 
the catwalk and get out cm the street," Ozbek 
added. 

That is the challenge of this Paris season, 
where designers have to reflect the profound 
changes that are going on in the hearts and 
minds of women — while filling their dose Is 
with clothes for here and now. 

SUZY MENKES is fashion editor of the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


3 lp-i§pi 






ClnHrat/IHT 

Fashion's new landscape for fall: Dirk Bikkembergs' leather; Emporio 
Armani's empire dress; Rifat Ozbek's shearling jacket. 


New Horizons for Luxury Goods Makers 


| By Michfte Loyer 

P ARIS— With high fashion still in the 
doldrums m Europe and the United 
Stales, luxury companies are hoping 
to find new fashion markets sprout- 
ing like spring bulbs in some of the more 
unlikely corners of the world. 

The supposed hot growth areas for the new 
millenium are Latin America, following a new 
trade agreement: Vietnam, where trade with 
the United States was opened up last month: 
India, where the government has opened to 
foreign investors and the middle class is grow- 
ing; and the huge market in China. 

The Mercosur trade agreement between Ar- 
gentina, Brazil. Uruguay and Paraguay, which 
lowered the tax on textile imports, has attract- 
ed exporters' interest to Latin America. Yet a 
recent survey conducted by Profem, the 
French federation of women’s wear manufac- 
turers. showed that it will be some time before 
any of the Latin American countries becomes a 
“new Japan" for the luxury goods industry. 

“The old-moneyed elite with their European 
culture, prefer to buy luxury products in their 
country of origin." says Than Lan Ngyen, Pro- 
fem’s international marketing manager. “The 
new rich do not have the culture for it, and the 
middle class is suffering from the economic 
restructuring and has lost its buying power." 

In Latin America, the major market for 
French luxury goods exporters is for medium- 
priced products and for accessories, which are 
almost totally absent from the local scene. “If 
they want to export to those markets, manufac- 
turers will have to offer “total concept' collec- 
tions. including accessories.” adds Ngyen. 


Because of the antiquated retail system, ex- 
porters of high-quality goods will also he 
forced to open their own shops. Louis Vuitton, 
for one. is looking for a well-located and af- 
fordable boutique in Buenos Aires. “We are 
still looking.” said Jean-Marie Lou bier. Vuit- 
ton’5 director of marketing and communica- 
tion. “Right now Latin America is not high' 
enough priority to justify the extravagant 
prices demanded for these boutiques ” 

India, once an unlikely market for luxuiy 
goods, is now on exporters* agendas thanks to a 
new government policy favoring foreign in- 
vestment and permitting the importation of 
consumer goods. Nine million of India's 880 
million people are very rich, and 88 million are 
well off enough to afford Western products. 

Pierre Cardin, the licensing pioneer of the 
fashion world, has just returned from a tour of 
Asia, where he signed two licensing agreements 
in Vietnam and finalized a joint-venture agree- 
ment in Bombay. From now on, Pierre Cardin 
Fashion Private Ltd. will distribute all “Made 
in India” Cardin products. 

But it is elsewhere in Asiai — and especially 
China with its 1. 15 billion consumers — that 
looks like fashion’s future. 

After several decades of “waste not, want 
not.” the Chinese are beginning to experiment 
with “want not. waste a lot." Even if the average 
annual salary in China is less that $500. there are 
reported to be 20 to 50 million potential con- 
sumers of luxury goods in the countty. 

“Not only China, but the whole of Asia- 
represents a huge potential marker for luxury 
goods." says Christian Blankaert. president of 
the Comile Colbert, the French federation of 
luxury goods manufacturers. 


“The dragon countries or the Asia-Pacific 
region alone represent 30 percent of the global 
. market for luxuiy products.” he said, adding 
■ that the figure was up 10 percentage points in 
the last five years. “Asian countries love luxu- 
ry. They should soon become the first market 
for French luxury products.” 

Potential exporters, however, should know a 
few basic rules before attacking the huge Chi- 
nese marker. The first: be patient: the second: 
gei a Chinese partner. 

These are strategies used by the Japanese 
group Hanae Mori to establish itself in China. 
The Tokyo-based company started dealing 
with China 20 years ago. with a collection of 
hand-embroidered blouses made in Shanghai. 

But even now, the company remains re- 
served about selling its international collection 
in China. “We are still at the observation 
stage.” says Kei Mori. 

To most exporters, the entree to the Chinese 
market is Hong Kong and Taiwan. “The Chi- 
nese diaspora has given a boost Id our name in 
China since a lot of our products reach the 
mainland from Taiwan" said Philippe Guer- 
laio. general manager of Guerlain perfumes. 

But Louis Vuitton. one of the firet companies 
to introduce status symbol shopping to China 
with the 1992 opening of a shop in the Beijing 
Palace hold, sees strong local buying. “There is 
■a lot of money in China, partly coming from the 
Chinese diaspora and partly from unreported 
incomes.” said Lou bier. “We make 60 percent of 
our sales to the ordinary Chinese ” < 

MICHELE LOYER is a journalist based in 
Paris. 


■ 

•IS 


rip 




Japan’s Former Spendthrifts Search for Quality 


By Chris Cook 


: v . 




T OKYO — Tales of Jap- 
anese women forming 
long lines outside of 
Chanel boutiques in 
Hong Kong or Honolulu, or eager- 
ly snatching up every mono- 
grammed Louis Vuitton bag in 
sight are legend anywhere Japa- 
nese tour groups go en masse. 

But a slowdown in the economy 
has forced Mr. and Mrs. Average to 
rein in their spending at least for 
the time being. The emphasis is not 
on quantity but on quality, an as- 
pect that Japanese have long recog- 
nized in European luxury goods. 

“There’s no question that 
spending patterns have changed. 
The interest in fashion is still 


Accessories • Jewellery • Obiects 




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SWAROVSKI 

PARIS 


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TEL 111 40170740 





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and a Bridge Collection 
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Salon 164. 
lfel.: (1) 47.23.54.00 


strong, but the amounts being 
spent are now subject to more dis- 
cipline." says Nao Oishi. an inter- 
national fashion journalist. “Japa- 
nese are looking for economic 
bargains.” 

But the allure of foreign fash- 
ion, particularly European fash- 
ion. remains strong for the Japa- 
nese, she says, adding that those 
who do have money are still 
spending it oa imported clothes. 

“It is the total Western concept 
that appeals to us,” Oishi says. 
“The Japanese consider and high- 
ly respect the classical and tradi- 
tional elements of Western styling 
— including such aspects as the 
cul the proportion, fabric selec- 
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lapel detailing — as being out- 
standing.” 

SPRING SUMMER 
COLLECTION 

ESCAIK 

Paris left tank 
For orders 

FAX: (1)42 84 2415 

Marie-Martine 

8, rue de Sevres, 

Paris 6t*i 


The customer is looking for 
three things in Italian clothes, says 
Urn Norfleet, menswear sales 
chief at Barneys New York store 
in Tokyo: “One. the price. Two. 
the quality and tailoring, and three 
the fabric.” He added that sales of 
upmarket men's clothing hadn't 
really been hit by the recession. 

In fact, thanks to competitive 
pricing, some have even reported 
sales gains. 

Giorgio Armani, one of the fa- 
vorite designers of well-off Japa- 
nese. has lowered prices for two 
consecutive years, according to a 
spokesman. Prices in Japan are 25 
percent lower than they were a 
year ago. Sales volume as a result 
has increased despite economic re- 
cession. he said, but declined to be 
more specific. “In terms of the 
number of items sold, the total 
volume has increased considera- 
bly." he said. The Italian designer 
gets 1 5 percent to 20 percent ofhis 
worldwide sales in Japan. 

In January. Barneys posted a 
120 percent sales rise from a vear 
earlier. Norfleet said, citing" the 
company’s private label — Ra- 
daelli Exclusively for Barneys 
New York — and a follow-up ser- 
vice that includes sending ‘“Thank 
You" cards to customers. 

Their customers are younger 
businessmen who have a sense of 
style Lhat goes well beyond the 


polyester suits of the salarymen — 
the legions in same-cut, same-col- 
or suits straight from department- 
store racks who make a sorry sight 
on their way to the office in the 
mornings. 

These younger executives, most- 
ly in their 30s and 40s and often 
owners of their own businesses, 
regard the well-cut. preferably 
Italian suit both as a mark of suc- 
cess and also a fashion statement. 

In addition to the conservative 
suits of Giorgio Arman L the flash- 
ier clothes of designer Gianni Ver- 
sace are also popular. 

Despite the bright colors and 
often sexy cuts that tend to be a bit 
of a handicap in the Japanese mar- 
ket, Versace had sales of 1 1 billion 
yen ($105 million) in Japan lost 
year, making it his most important 
market in Asia, according to a 
company spokesman. 

The Japanese love for European 
fashion comes at the expense of 
traditional dress, however. The 
beautiful Japanese kimono , Kore- 
an haobak and Chinese danpam 
ore becoming rare sights, reserved 
for such special occasions as mar- 
riages. On the runways in Tokyo, 
Seoul or Hong Kong it often 
seems as if designers have com- 
pletely forgotten their heritage. 

CHRIS COOK is a fashion writer 
for The Japan Times. 




O* 




ondov ' r 


'• % ^ 


INTERNATIONAL ilERAt J> TRIBUNE. MONDAY, MARCH 7, 1994 


Menswear Comes Back 

IHl bwing Sty les Temper Unisex for the ’ 90s 


By Katherine Knorr 


iETrSwS?? w ^° hurd 

cause of paries VII against tie English and Burgun- 
dy? 5 -fi-SfjS!— - m ihe lake. What i/lS 
rtS m^erstood perhaps is that one of the important 
! acojsabons against her was for cross-dressinT^ 

I .TS *®settied. days for the Frmchmonar- 

^ for ^hion. Long or 
I short? Tight or loose? The answer a lot of the timefon 
i the runways and m the shop windows, is panis7Take a 
• k»k. atwomen s stores ; What you're going to see is the 
i great return ot mcnswear. 

! Forge t the power-suit, the pin-striped Mrs. Boss, the 

; androgynous look. Today’s clothes are soft and loose 
I and totally feminine. Tour spring-summer shop win- 
■ dows m Pans, from Agnes B. to Kenzo to Gaultier or 
Yohji Yamamoto, and you will find, for men and 
| women (and very often in the same window). Jong 
[ loose jackets, wide pants and everywhere waistcoats of 
! all sizes, shapes and colon. When there are starts, they 
are mostly long (mid-calf) and billowy, looking very 
much like the pants. 

This latest “uniscn" look isn’t about imitating men 
but about borrowing the fabrics, the quality and the fit 
that have always been the strong suit of menswear. 

“1 was determined that, although it was influenced 
by. my design for. men, it wasn’t cross-dressing, it 
wasn’t power dressing," says the English designer Paul 
Smith of his first women’s wear line * 

That change is in the wind can be seenfrcJm; the fact 
that this popular menswear designer, with 90 shops 
around the world, felt the need for a women’s line. His 
^pash-register research had shown him that T 5 percent 
'of his sales worldwide were coming from women 
buying for themselves. 

In designing for women, hisapproach was "putting a 
lot of attention to cot and the quality of the clothes," 
with such luxuries as "silk lining , male pockets,” and 
□sing "fabrics that you would naturally select for men." 
He cites a kind of Tasmanian wool, a "fabric developed 
for businessmen wbo travel a lot," winch he makes into 
an unlfn ed suit, for a woman. "You can put it in your 
suitcase and it bounces to life when you open ft." 

That women could be sexy dressed like men was 
evident with Garbo and Dietrich, but in their clothes 
and in their lives those two modern legends played up 
androgyny. Katharine Hepburn made menswear femi- 
nine, put it took the French to make it truly elegant, 
above all Coax Chanel, who is the *20s was wearing 
men’s tronsera. -Yves Saint Laurent's tmedo-inspired 
evening wear, and more recently the Annani jacket are 
the most successful recent examples of his for her. 

It was famous nonsense in the 1960s that you 
couldn't tell the girls from the boys. In fact the 
liberated (sort of)- ’60s node the differences between 
boys and girls a good deal more graphic: The mini- 
start, hip-hugging bell-bottoms and tiny tank topi left 
no zoom far rioub! Punk came closer to unisex fash- 
ion, in its grotesque, nihilis t post-nuclear manner, with 
alarming dips into military chkrand radical solutions 
to the old problem of long ot short hair (high-fashion 
models were inspired, giving us the fnsson of the 
shaved-head girl). 

The inspiration for today’s unisex fashions' is. closer 
to dad’s close! Grunge, lor ah its horrors, has brought 


riv»n- r w 


ine, she is looking to the wind, so I can see only ner 
hair , a bit of her profile, she lodes to the wind, the 
fabric is swinging, she’s like 40 ot 50 years old. At the 
same time she is very sexy. I am afraid to say this to 
Ameri can readers, but she is smoking a cigar.” 


KATHERINE ENORR ism the staff of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


U.S. Upturn Passes 


By Bemadiiie Moms 


N EW YORK — More 
people are buying 
houses. Automobile 
sales are up. These are 
among the signs that the economy 
in the United States is improving, 
by fits and starts. Bui the fashion 
business'' It is sitting quietly on 
the back burner, not exactly de- 
pressed. but not going anywhere 
fast. 

Fashion is no longer considered 
a top priority by many women, 
retailers reluctantly report. 
Thanks to low interest rales, con- 
sumers are more inclined to put 
their money into houses, home 
furnishings, home improvements 
and vacations, rather than things 
to wear. The change in attitude has 
become palpable in the last few 
yearn. Retailers blame evetybody: 
designers for not being in touch 
with what women need, stores Tor 
buying inappropriate . styles and 
journalists lor promoting them in 
words and pictures. 

. This feeling about the present 
irrelevance of clothes represents a 
.big change in consumer thinking. 
Just a few years ago. American 
women eagerly followed fashion 
and sought new clothes. Especially 
if they were working women —a 
caiegorv enlarged in the past two 
decades — they felt it essential to 
their image to wear designer 
clothes in the current fashion 
shapes. 

Retailers have a lot of theories 
about why the attitude has 
chan ged. Basically, they believe 
that designers made the wrong 
clothes at the wrong time and that 
stores were misguided when -they 
promoted them. Women found 
the press reports, including the re- 
ported runway battle betwwn 
glamorous superraod cls SK, i 1 ' 
try waifs, but they did not really 
identify with the. styles. They 
bought the magazine, were enter- - 
tained bv the reports, but did not 
fed the need to rush out to buy the 
dothes. Once they •wW** 
checked out their neighborhood 
stores to see the style thgrjejj 
about; now they have decided they 
do not need to bother. 

1 At a time when they warned 
comfort, flattery, wrijjr 
reassurance from their clothes, 
they were offered sce-througj 
rics, baby dresses and J” 

! Styles that look like underwear 
not the son of thing they wan 
to wear to work. If » l 
choice between buying a was^S 
machine and buying a suit, tn 
fast. . ■ „ 

‘ “We've been in a design 
trough." said Philip Mn,er :£T 

than ofSaks Fifth Avenue. Worn 

en perceived many styles 
wearable or unflattering. 
were, indeed, often inapprop" 

ate " * 

Among the design P rob |fS" 
recent seasons cited hy retailers 


'or < Hi* 




Total retail sales monthly 
$ KJlions — 



I* 

nJli 

»» 

&B8j&3&2a&ESEmmm* 


Source: U.S. Commerce Dept 

were that collections became so 
repetitive that you could not tell 
the designer without a sco recard ; 
after hemlines dropped precipi- 
tously without any reason and 
then rose when women objected, 
length became unimportant; and 
fads like shoes with platform soles 
and bell bottom pants failed to 
develop a strong following. 

The turn-off was so complete 
that even certain rational trends 
like the fashion for white cotton 
shirts failed to take off because 
women were not paying attention. 
Many store executives mentioned 
the fact that most stores, a sea of 
black clothes last fall, became a 
monotone of beige for spnng-ata 
time when customers were search- 

^^bedosdng of shops all over the 
. United States specializing in fash- 
ion in the upper price brackets cut 
down the exposure of many de- 


aubercy 

PARIS ■ 


Custom-made 

craftsmanship . 

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out ambition 
from generation 
to generation 
over the past 60 years. 

u me Virienne 75002 Paris. 
' Td:(t)42339361 


Fashion/A Special Report 




Page 13 


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back into the street the real man's jacket, men's shirts 
or sweaters (and of course grunge isn't all that new, as 
it resembles the lumberjack waffle- slomper unisex 
look of the early 1970s). Still, grunge has inspired 
more subtle designers to look again at men’s clothes. 

“The reason that I am so impressed by mem’s clothes 
on women is because 1 haven’t otherwise noticed an 
alternative to frilly women’s clothes and hard men’s 
lapels," says the 'American designer Isaac Mizrahi, 
whose spring collection showed men’s trousers with 
Suspenders and a blazer. 

His approach was to go all out: His blazer is really a 
man’s blazer, not simply man's tailoring, and be calls 
this "the thoroughly American approach: Just take the 
damn thing and do it" 

The French way is subtler, perhaps. "I have a 
tendency to soften the line a bit," says Agnes B„ whose 
pantsuits and man-inspired shins and vests have 
helped make the designer an institution. “I do it also 
for men. 1 no longer like hard shoulders. It’s all coming 
together now, for clothes that are more measured. The 
silhouette is longer.” - 

"It brings out fe minini ty to wear masculine things," 
she adds. (She says she suggested something Hke this 
to Madonna and that the response was a fax ordering 
some Agnhs B. trousers.) 

And then there's Jean-Paul Gaultier, who wouldn’t 
be true to himself if be didn't do it weird. Although 
most of the shelves in his Gaultier and Gaultier Junior 
shops are peopled with pretty mainstream linen jack- 
ets, totally unisex, be is also showing variations on the 
waistcoat (mostly falling way above the waist, or way 
below) and something that looks like a Louis XVI 
frock coat. 

Nol only is menswear more comfortable for a lot of 
women, it is also camouflage — not to hide the body, 
but not to draw attention to it either. “A lot of my 
customers are creative people in creative jobs," says 
Smith, "nicely confident people who wanted clothes 
that allowed them to be themselves.'’ He feels a lot of 
people are “fed up with being extremely in.’ Yon are 
what you are, here are clothes for you to continue to be 
an architect, a humorous person, a good mom." 

Mizrahi says “people are freaked out” at being fed a 
certain idea of fashion, whether it’s high glamour, or 
more recently in-your-face ugliness: "Ihe waif or 
drug-addict look is a slap in the face of women.” 

Camouflage could be said to be the inspiration for 
many of Yohji Yamamoto's long, sensuous dothes. 
"My idea of sexiness comes from the idea erf cover- 
ing,” says the Japanese designer. "I don't like things to 
be too obvious. And sometimes it’s not only to make a 
physical or proportional point. Sometimes people 
want to.be another person. We don’t want to be 
identified too easily from the outside." 

YolgPs clothes make the difference between pants 
and skirts almost invisible (or transparent). A lot of 
this season’s skirts — at Kenzo, for example — seem 
to be a modified version of pants, topped with men's 
jackets. 

And what are the winds of fashion telling Yohji? 
Tm designing things mainly for a certain woman who 
does not exist, an ideal woman. She is not looking at 






y .< 

<V- Mbf 
*iYK 



Clockwise from left: Snoop Doggy Dogg the rap artist and fashion influence; Sandrine Bonncdre as Joan of Arc; ChaneFs rapper-inspired 
outfit ; Jean-Paul Gaultier's modified frock coat; Yofyi Yamamoto's billowy slacks and tunic for men; and Isaac Mizrahi's tuxedo for women. 

Black Urban Street Wear Sets Fashion Trends 


By Cathy Horyn 


M ONICA Lynch, the president 
of Tommy Boy Records, was 
in her office the other day in 
New York giving a telephone 
interview about the nuances of black style —* 
West Coast rap, hard core, hip-hop, rump 
shaking in Miami — when the latest nuance 
suddenly appeared on her television screen. 

“Here’s Wutang Clan now," she said. Wu- 
tang Clan, for those who don't know, is a 
hip-bop group from Staten Island “That’s 
different," Lynch said They wear Ninja 
masks and are considered influential in the 
underground music scene. 

“Hey, you know what?” The record pro- 
ducer was stills grossed in the TV. “They've 
gpt on one at those hats 1 was just talking 
about, tite blade and white wool ones with 
the little brim.” Lynch has been tracking 
these hats afl winter. First they werein black, 
then brown, then blue and now— plaid She 
sounded pleased There's always something 
new.** 

How true. Ever since RUN DMC put on 
Adidas track shoes back in the mid- 80s, 
fashio n has come increasingly under the in- 
fluence of urban black style, to the point 
where new ideas are played out almost from 


the moment they first appear on MTV. "Six 
months ago it was baggy leans and oversized 
T-shirts," said Wendy Ezrailson, a Washing- 
ton retailer whose store, Commander Sala- 
mander, is a hub for the easily bored. "Now 
it’s retro ’50s, striped shins with zips in the 
front, sneakers and light pants.” 

And what about Cross Colors and other 
Afro-centric labels? “They’re dead," she 
said. "The kids won’t touch them." 

And yet just as the youth market was 
moving on to something else, Complice was 
jumping on the spring bandwagon of Afro- 
centrism with dflshilcis, bright colors and one 
regrettable reference to Mammy. Karl La- 
gerfeld tried on baggy jeans at Chanel, and 
tiie tracksuit found its way into the collec- 
tions of Isaac Mizrahi and Anna Sui, though 
it had already been recycled by Laura Whit- 
comb in her 3-year-old Label line. 

But even Whitcomb, for all her close lies 
to street wear, finds herself on the run. “l ean 
try out one erf my dresses in a music video 
and before I’ve had a chance to produce it, 
some guy in Korea has knocked me,” Whit- 
comb said. “It’s like everybody is in a race to 
bring out something new." . 

Five years ago it was easy to draw connec- 
tions between what surfaced in dubs and 
what eventually found its way to high fash- 


ion. but as black dance music has stratified 
into narrower grooves — techno, gangsta. 
hard core — so too have their associated 
styles of dress. 

Veronica Webb, the black model thinks 
that this constant progression of new ideas 
explains why designers look to black teen- 
agers for inspiration. “Blade culture is popu- 
lar culture,” she said. "Black people are not 
nostalgic. They’re always moving forward." 

Bat h’s no less tine that the distinctions 
between black and white street cultures have 
become increasing ly blurred by a crossover 
of language, customs and dress. So whose 
style is it? 

Richard Martin, curator of the Costume 
Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art 
in New York, wonders, in fad. if the urban 
street look of the past few years hasn’t bot- 
tomed out T don’t think it’s being constant- 
ly refreshed right now," be said. 

Martin and others point to the growing 
appeal among young blacks for classic doth- 
ing by Tommy HUfiger, Ralph Lauren and 
Timberiand 

Lynch suggests that what appeals to urban 
blade youths about yachting jackets from 
Nautica and polo shirts from Lauren is that 
such styles have in the past represented ex- 
clusion. In other words, wearing them now is 


away of acquiring status, and defying stereo- 

"K Martin, the fashion historian, goes one 
step. further. He thinks there's a connection 
to be made between the desire to appear 
traditional, or privileged, and the widening 
social implications of blade conservatism, 
particulany as put forth by Louis Farrakhan. 
At the very leas! said Martin, “what we’re 
looking at is the burgeoning of the black 
middle dass,” 

Everything in fashion these days demands 
an appreciation erf nuance. What appears 
retro or preposterous to one person may in 
fact be the beginnings of the next big trend. 

The other nigh! the rapper Snoop Doggy 
Dork (who. like, many other gangsta artists, 


Dogg (who. Hki» man y other gangsta artists, 
has had serious brushes with the law) was on 
television wearing a pair erf khakis with a 
bockey jersey oveT a sweatshirt. His Afro was 
plaited, ana while his hair has helped to 
rerive Afros in recent months, nothing else 
about his appearance suggested that he was 
onto something new. And then one seized on 
the significance of the' hockey jersey: Has 
hockey ever been a “black” sport? 

It was just the sort of irony that a fashion 
designer amid appreciate. 

CATHY HORYN is fashion editor of The 
Washington Post 


Imenuimul ffcrald Tribune 

signers. The shops include Bonwit 
Teller and Martha in New York, 
Amen Wardy in Los Angeles, Gar- 
finckeTs in Washington and Frost 
Bros, in Dallas. With outlets for 
their styles shrinking, American 
designers found their main com- 
petition was From European de- 
signers. 

The Europeans demand and get 
special ■ boutiques to showcase 
their wares and larger orders than 
the Americans do. observes Bill 
Blass, one of the leading American 
designers. 

There are still some areas of 
light in the business, however. Su- 
san Talk,, president of Henn Ben- 
del, said that luxurious styles like 
cashmere coats arid sweaters 
ranked high among fall fashion 
purchases. Winter coal business 
.was also strong. 

Despite tbegeneral sluggishness 
of the fashion business, many re- 


tailers report there were hot spots 
in recent 'months. A trunk snow, 
where a' designer's entire collec- 
tion is presented at a store, is al- 
most certain to bring results, espe- 
cially if the designer attends. 

Richard Tyler, who designed his 
first spring collection for Anne ' 
Klein, drew crowds at curious to • 
Saks Fifth Avenue in New York 
during a February snowstorm 
when the city almost stopped 
functioning. They bought S86.000 
worth of dothes. 

During the same period, Donna 
Karan brought more than 
$500,000 worth of business to 
Bergdorf Goodman and Cbanej 
dothes and accessories contribut- 
ed another 5750,000. , 

In order lo sell clothes, retailers 
now know, they have to work at it; 
But they do not believe that the 
current indifference to fashion is 
irreversible. The right dothes will 
help lead lo the road back, they 
say. 

“We’ve taken an awful beating 
from the weather in February, 
said Michael Gould, chairman of 
Bloomingdale's. “The business we 
lost from the days when (he snow 
made the dty impassable will nev- 
er be made up.” 

“But I’m optimistic," he said. “I 
think the dothes in our spring cat- 
alogue look so .much better than 
clothes have looked recently. 
They’re simple and believable, and 
I think the customer will re- 
spond.” 

BERNADINE MORRIS is chief 
fashion ‘writer of The'. Sew t York 
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WORLD STOCKS IN 


INTERNATIONAL HERALDTRIBUIVE, MONDAY, MARCH T. 1994 




V« Aeenee France- ftwie 

Amsterdam 

Sharp gains' in Philips and its 79 
percent-owned Polygram music 
subsidiary masked weakness in die 
rest of the market and kept the CBS 
all-share index to a minimal loss of 
0.60 points. The indicator ended 
the week at 279.40. 

Philips advanced 12 percent to 
5 1.6 guilders after announcing high- 
er- than-expected 1993 earnings and 


announcing its fust dividend since 
1990. PolyGram gained 9 percent to 
80.10 guilders after announcing a 
big sales improvement in 1993. 

Volume was lower with 8.4 bil- 
lion guilders in shares out of 22.6 
billion guilders in total 

Frankfurt 

Prices fell last week on concerns 
about inflation and interest rates. 


Last Week’s Markets 


Ait ftavres arvasot ctase of trading Friday 

Stock Indexes 

UnBtd Staten Mar. 4 Feb. 25 OfM 
OJ Indus. M3M0 X638J8 -0.17% 

OJ Util. 212.10 -20&41 + 1.77 % 

DJ Trans. 1,737.27 1 ,76209 — 1 ^ 0 % 

S&PI00 43141 «L32 —03B% 

S & P 500 46474 466J07 —079% 

S & P Ind 54574 54578 +007% 

NYSE Cp 25770 25877 -074% 

Britain 

FTSE 100 2&m 378170 -ft.10% 

FT 30 256120 153640 +156% 

Japan 

Nikkei 225 19,966. 19501 +072% 

■ Cermqny 

DAX 2AO09 257472 —0.71 % 

Htw Kang 

Hang Sens 9,91119 10,10020 — 150% 

WorW 

MSCIP 616.60 61970 —044% 

World index From Morgan Stanley Capital Intt 


Money Rates 

unitad Slater 
Discount rale 
Prime rare 
Federal funds rate 


Discount 
Call money 
3-montfi interbank 
Germany 

Lombard 
Call money 
3-moniti interbank 
Britain 

Bank base rate 
Call money 
3-montti Interbank 
QbM Mar. 4 

London pjn.flx5 375.95 


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The DAX ‘index fell 14.83 points, 
or 0.7 percent, to 3.060.09, while 
trading volume rose to 44.14 billion 
Deutsche marks from 4 1.08 billion. 

German shares were, already 
weakened by rising yields on U.S. 
bonds wheq the Bundesbank 
rocked the Frankfurt market with a 
report Wednesday of a 20.6 percent 
annualized increase in the M-3 
money supply for January. 

The Bundesbank scrambled 
Thursday to calm the markets, $ay- 
I ing it had no plans to raise interest 
rates and that the higher- than -ex- 
pected M-3 figure was an anomaly 
caused in part by new accounting 
procedures. 

Hardest hit were banks, which 
are sensitive to interest -rate fluctu- 
ations. Deutsche Bank fell 18.10 
DM to 790. while Dresdner Bank 
plummeted 24 to 393 JO and Com- 
merzbank lost 1 1 to 337 DM. Al- 
lianz lost 55 to 2,475. 

Hong Kong 

Hong Kong share prices 
slumped on concerns over U.S. in- 
terest-rate rises, with the Hang 
Seng Index losing 182.06 points, to 
close the week’s trading at 9,9 1 8. 1 9. 

' Average daily volume fell to 5 203 
billion Hong Kong dollars from the 
previous week’s 5.986 billion. 

A strong profit report from 
HSBC on Monday supported over- 
all prices. 

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at midweek. Although it fell below 
3,200 points on Wednesday, the 
Financial Times- Stock Exchange 
100-share index ended at 3,278.0. 
down 32 points. 

Nonetheless, the index has lost 
7.4 percent from its record finish of 
3.539.2 on Feb. 3. 


Zeneca, which announced strong 
annual results, gained 10 pence to 
reach 762,. sustaining other phar- 
-maceutical issues. 

Banks were affected by weak fi- 
nancial markets, notably Warburg, 
which fell 60 pence ,lo 824. . 

HSBC Holdings lost 78 pence to 
finish at 860 despite a 53 percent 
rise in pretax profit in 1993. - 

Vickers gave up 12 pence to 
reach 180 mole GKN, where prof- 
its fell 20 percent last year, none- 
theless rose 18 pence , to end the 
week at 557 in response to positive 
comments from traders. 

Ladbroke, the betting and hotel 
company whose profits jumped last 
year, gave up 3.5 pence to end the 
week at 198.5. 

Milan 

Demand for shares in recently 
privatized companies limited the 
declines that followed news of a 
sharp rise in the German money 
supply. The Mibtel index fell 105. 
to 10,378 points. 

Shares in former state-owned 
bank, Banca Cotnmerciale Italians, 
known as Comit, gained 3.08 per- 
cent to 6,199 lire after a flotation at 
5,400 lire per share. 

Credilo Italiano was dragged 
higher in itswake, gami ng 3.56 per- 
cent to 2,075 lire. 

Fiat gained 0.49 percent to 4,759 
lire but its gains were Dimmed by 
disappointing February car deliv- 
ery figures on Friday. 

Paris 

A 4 percent fall by midweek was 
largely reversed, and the CAC-40 
index ended with a decline of 20.23 
points, or I percent, at 2,178.69. 

Concerns that the upward trend 
of American interest rates could 
slow reductions in Europe readied 
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announcement of a sharp increase 
in the German money supply. 

Singapore 

1 Fears of rising U.S. interest rates 
and the American-Japanese trade 
. dispute depressed prices last week. 

The Straits Times Industrials in- 
' dex plunged 108.76 points, or 4.6 
' percent, to dose the week at 
2£48.63, while the broader SES 
All-Singapore index fell 16.9 
points, to 588.24. 

' Volume fell to 1.15 billion units 
' worth 3.16 billion Singapore dollars 
from 1.18 billion units valued at 4.99 
billion dollars the previous week. 

. Keppe! feD 70 cents, to 10.20 
dollars, while Inchcape was down 
15, at 5.75. 

Tokyo 

■ Supported by foreign investors, 
the market roseTast week. The Nik- 
kei average of 215 leading issues 
finished at 19,997 JO points^ up 0.8 
percent, and the broader Tokyo 
Price. Index also rose 0.8 percent, to 
T,622J9. 

Daily volume on the major board 
averaged 419.1 million shares, up 
from 353.0 million shares. 

. Foreign investors were net buy- 
ers while institutions were easing 
their selling pressure as they 
dressed up accounts ahead of the 
March 31 end of the business year, 
brokers said. 

Zurich 

■The market followed the Euro- 
pean trend and tumbled last week, 
with the Swiss Performance Index 
losing 32.97 points, or 1.7 percent, 
to close at 1,839.31. 

'Heavy selling by U.S. and British 
institutions aggravated the down- 
ward trend, brokers said. 

; UBS fell 138 Swiss francs to 1,275 
after a series of sell recommends- 
tioos in the wake of 1993 results [ 
announced the previous week. Cred- | 
it Suisse, which announced belter- ] 
than-expected results on Friday, j 
could not escape the shift of semi- ! 
mem on Swiss banks and fell 27 to 1 
647. SBS fell 17 to 448. ! 


Taiwan Machinery Threatened 

Privatisation Endangered by Lack of Bids 


TAIPEI —Taiwan's auction of a 
60 percent stake in Taiwan Ma- 
chinery Manufacturing Corp. is on 
the brink of failure and ihe govern- 
ment mav have to break up the 
ailing company in order to priva- 
tize it. officials said on Saturday. 

The maker of heavy machinery 
and steel products was to have been 
the first state-owned company in 
which a majority stake was to be 
transferred into private hands since 
the 1960s. At the base price estab- 
lished for the auction, the stake 
would cos! about S2G0 million. 

But Cheng Wen-ching. executive 
director of the Commission of Na- 
tional Corporations, said no appli- 


Mingly Launches 
China Venture 

Blaoirjiers Business .Vmi 

HONG KONG — Mingly 
Corp.. an investment company 
based in Hong Kong, said Sunday 
it had teamed up with China Great 
Wall Industry Corp-. a govern- 
ment-owned company in China, to 
farm a joint venture that will seek 
funds for investment in Chinese 
industrial and real estate projects. 

Mingly Great Wall, as the ven- 
ture will be known, will be capital- 
ized with 10 million Hong Kong 
dollars (SI-29 million). 

Mingly and its controlling share- 
holder, the Cha family, will own 60 
percent of Mingly Great Wall 
through a subsidiary, C M. Pacific 
LtcL, while China Great Wall win 
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cations from local or fareign, inves- 
tors to bid in the auction had been 
received. 

Applications closed on Saturday. 
Due lo delays in the postal system, 
however, the commission will not 
know for sure until Monday wheth- 
er anvbodv wants to bid in the 
auction, which has been scheduled 
for March 10, Mr. Cheng said. 

“If the auction fails, we may try 
to auction off the firm's four fac- 
tories separately.'’ he said. 

The government has set a dead- 
line for the end of June for the 
privatization of the company, but 
similar deadlines have been extend- 
ed repeatedly in the past. ■■ 

Foreigners will be allowed to buy 
a total of 40 percent of the compa- 
ny in the auction of 385 million 
shares. The extent of private own- 
ership of Taiwan Machinery cur- 
rently is only 0.25 percent. 


Taiwan is having difficulty pri- 
vatizing even its best state-owned#" 
businesses because of . a volatile 
stock market and poor planning, 

. Securities analysis said Taiwan 
Machinery, which has posted fif : 
straight years of losses totaling 
about $300 million, was widely per- 
ceived as a high-risk investment. 

The company posted a net loss of 
1.89 billion Taiwan dollars ($71 j 
million) on sales of 4.91 billion dol- 
lars in the year which ended last 
June. A year earlier, the company 
recorded a loss of 2.46 billion dol- 
lars while its sales had totaled 4.16 
billion dollars. 

Yao Wei, a spokesman for the 
company, said that it needed annu- 
al sales of 9 billion Taiwan dollars 
to become profitable, though like 
many state companies it hada high 
net asset value because of large 
land holdings. 


/ ' J 

ir- 


Hong Kong Aids Sime Darby 

ConynleJ'bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

KUALA LUMPUR — . Sime Darby BhcL the Malaysian con- 
glomerate, said Saturday that its profit in the first half of its financial 
year, which ended on Dec. 31, had risen 19 percent from a year ago. 
to 203.9 million ringgit (£73.9 million), it added that it expected to 
m ai n t a i n or improve that level of profitability in its second half. 

The company, which also said that revenue in its first half had 
risen 18 percent, to 3.91 trillion ringgit, said the Hong Kong region 
had overtaken. Malaysia as the top contributor to profit. 

Sune said its Hong Kong operations posted impressive results, 
especially in the motor arid construction sectors, in spire of currency 
restrictions on trade with China. Pretax profit from the region rose 33 
percent, to 952 million ringgit, in the company’s fust half 

The Malaysia region accounted for pretax profit of 93.6 milli on 
ringgit, up IS percent, reflecting the feign growth rate of the country's 
economy, the company said. But profit from its plantation division feD 
52 percent, to 14.6 million ringgit, due to lower palm product prices 
and losses in the latex-products business. 

Sime said its Singapore region achieved higher profits as a result of 
growth in the metalworking and consumer-service sectors, bat that the 
Australian region reported lower earnings due to a fall in margins from 
vehicle sales as a result of the strong yea. (Reuters. Bloomberg) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 7, 1994 




Page la 


♦World Cup Will Introduce 

A New 3-Substitute Rule 


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ZURICH — Three substitutes nni* m~~ 

than in the past will be allowed atsoccer 
. ... *. .matches starting wnh the w 0 rfd ^ 

. r . IDGf. 

’ cban J^ approved over the weekend, 

-v wtfl alkw coaches to bring in two field subS 

■ IE”? 300,16,11 goalkeeper 

‘ 'r- dimga match. Unul now, the soalie was 
■- r included m the two-substitute contingent. 

' ■ ' -5 n d f S ? gned t w ^ ^hes more 

' -^SkL 111 SCtU - n g Spying tactics, was ap- 
nile-making IntemationS 
5®* 811 Aswciation Board. The eight-man 
body groups four officials from HFa. socct^ 
international governing body, and one reore- 
sentauve from each of the four British soccer 
associations. 

y, ■ IS 5 “ m o£fer r 10 *e coach,” said FIFA’s 
? sc ! M5ral S f? 1 W’ Jo *P h He said the 

"Db • rate would be introduced at the World Cup 
' ^ ^ ^ mle( i States starting June 17. 

These were other announcements after the 
■ board’s two-day meeting ai FIFA headquarters 
in Zurich: 

“ J * _ * "iB “stnict referees at this year’s 
' i*:-' ’ wond Cup to move harshly against “reckless” 

• • . fouls, including tackles from behind. 

‘ ‘ • u ■ Graham Kelly, chief executive of England’s 
- Footba11 Association, said FIFA will stress that 


“referees identify dangerous play, and impose 
the appropriate sanction.” Blatter reiterated 
that he wanted a man datory expulsion for rear 
tackles to be written into the game’s laws. 

• A new rule requires that portable goals be 
securely anchored to avoid accidents. 

• The board wUl study whether to streamline 
the offside rule. Kelly said that while the offside 
rule “is one of the shortest in the book, it causes 
more controversy, more complexity than 
most" 

• Blatter said the four British associations 
gave no immediate reply to a request for a 
volunteer league where throw-ins would be re- 
placed with lock-ins. 

He said first divisions were unlikely to be 
chosen for such a trial because dubs would 
have to switch bade to the regular playing 
system for international 

Blatter cut off a reporter trying to ask about 
his argument with FIFA’s president, Joio Ha- 
velange of Brazil. 

Havelange, 77, has run FIFA since 1974 and 
is expected to seek a fifth term in June shortly 
before the World Cup starts. 

Blatter and American organizers elashfd 
with Havelange after he banned Pete from the 
Worid Cup draw in Las Vegas last December 
because the former soccer star is involved in a 
lawsuit with Havel an ge’s son-in-law. 





Const WatiaVRoam 

Rob Andrews, clearing the ball against France, sewed afl 18 of England’s points with Ms kicking in Paris. 


Host U.S. Still Far From Certain About Final Team Roster 


■ • v v • - 

•<. V- - 

■'.I,'* / 

t - 


7 By Alex Yannis 

New York Timex Service • 

■ NEW YORK — With the World Cup 
. about three months away, the U.S. i«nn is 

• faced with mean personnel questions iH»n 
perhaps any of those of the 23 other coun- 
tries in the finals. 

Without the highly competitive environ- 
\ meat of a professional league at home, the 
United States has played more imerna- 

• tional matches than any other national 
team in the last 14 months in preparation 
for the World Cup. 

Some of the 41 international m atche s 
the Americans played during that span 
were against high-caliber opponents, but 
the mqority were against weaker teams. 
As a result, it has been difficult for the 
coach. Bora Milutinovic, to judge how bis 
players would measure against the best in 
the finals. 

The United States hired MiJutinovic 
three years agp this month with visions he 
would accomplish what he did for Mexico 
in 1986 and Costa Rica is 1990. 

Milutinovic, a native of Yugoslavia, 
took Mexico to the quarterfinals when that 
country was host to the 1986 finals. In 


1990, he coached Costa Rica to the second 
round. 

Milutinovic’s mission will be judged a 
success if he takes the United States to the 
second round this summer. Anything be- 
yond that would be a bonus. 

If the Americans don’t advance past the 
first round, they will become the first host 
country not to survive the first round in 
the tournament, which started in 1930. 

Milutinovic and his assistants, Time 
Liekoski, Steve Sampson and Sigi S chmi d, 
have identified 60 players in the past three 
years in their quest for the 22 who will be 
on the final roster for the tournament 

The pool of players has been narrowed 
to 38 by the coaching staff and Bill Nut- 
tall, the general manager of the mam 
Twenty-four of the players are stationed at 
the team's training center in Mission Vigo, 

Calif o rnia 

Fourteen others play for dub teams 
abroad, including John Harkes (Derby 
County in England), Tab Ramos (Real 
Beds m Spain). Roy Wegerle (Coventry 
Gty in England), Eric Wynalda (F.C. 
Saarbnicken in Germany) and Ernie Stew- 
art (Willem II in the Netherlands). 

They will form the backbone of the *94 


Worid Cup team Their status has caused 
some resentment among the Misson Viejo 
players, who have played the majority of 
the preparatory matches. 

“You can't discredit what the guys here 
have done,” sweeper Marcelo Balboa said. 
“I think every position is open, and it has 
now come down to crunch time as to who 
would be selected.” 

It is important to keep in mind that most 
of the countries playing in the finals have 
some players who play professionally out- 
side their native countries. The major dif- 
ference is that they go by choice and not 
because their country doesn't have a pro- 
fessional Ipflgiv^ 

Obligations to their dubs will prevent 
most of the foreign-based U.S. players 
from joining the team until late next 
month. Mflutinovic thinks that is plenty of 
time to sdect the 22 whose names must be 
submitted to FIFA, the sport's governing 
body, by June 3. 

“It’s not important how much you're 
together, it’s much more important how 
good you are,” Milutinovic said during the 
recent FIFA seminar in Manhattan. 

Mflutmovic spent the greater pan of the 
last 10 days looking at some of the Europe- 


an-based players. He did not get a chance 
to see all of them because Harkes, Ramos 
and Wegerle are injured, with Wegerle 
expected to be out for another month. 

It was the contribution of the foreign- 
based players that had the soccer world 
stand up and take notice last June in U.S. 
Cup ’93, with the 2-0 victory over En gl and 
and a tight 4-3 loss to Germany, the de- 
fending World Cup champions. 

The U.S. Cup was one of three tourna- 
ments that provided the Americans with 
solid competition, along with the Copa 
America tournament, which involved tne 
top teams from South America, and the 
Gold Cup tournament, which included 
countries from the region. 

But the Americans suffered a humiliat- 
ing finish in Copa America and a 4-0 loss 
to Mexico in the Gold Cup final. 

Victories over teams such as the Cay- 
man Islands, El Salvador and Jamaica 
helped buDd a respectable record of 10-13- 
II m 1993. The United States has a 7-2-1 
record when it plays with its full team. 

This year, the United S tates has played 
seven games, six against countries that 
have qualified for the World Cup finals. 

The Americans have only one victory to 


Englan d Defeats 
France in Rugby, 
Irish, Scots Tie 


Compiled by Otr Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — England has given it- 
self a chance, albeit a faint one, of 
winning the Five Nations rugby 


go with two losses and four ties. The one 
victory was a 2-1 decision over Norway, a 
Worid Cup finalist. One of the ties came 
against Switzerland, and one of the losses 
against Romania, two of the countries the 
Americans will play in the opening round 
of the finals. 

Colombia is the other team in the Amer- 
icans' group. 

The absence of the foreign-based play- 
ers is the Americans' primary excuse for 
their slow start this year. 

In the Carls berg Cup, played in Hong 
Kong in mid-February, the Americans lost 
to Denmark on penalty kicks after a score- 
less tie in regulation and suffered a 2-1 loss 
to Romania, finishing last in the four-team 
tournament. 

It wasn't until the 3-1 loss to Sweden 
three weeks ago in the Joe Robbie Cup in 
Miami, a defeat that exposed the Ameri- 
cans’ defensive deficiencies, that the hier- 
archy of the U.S. Soccer Federation com- 
plained about the team's performance. 

But Milutinovic said he wasn’t upset. 

“I'm never upset,” be said. “1 need to see 
bow you play and why you played this 
way. 


for the seventh straight time, 18-14, 
on Rob Andrew’s kicking. 
England, though now without a 

S ‘n a full year of international 
, unproved to 2-1 and will play 
es, which has a 3-0 record, in 
the final match March 19. England 
has to win by more than 30 points 
to get the title on point differential. 

France, the defending champion, 
fell to 1-2 and plays Scotland the 
same day lo decide which finishes 
at the bottom of the standings. 

Andrew, selected as England's 
No. 1 goahricker for the first time 
since 1989, scored the first 12 
points of the match Saturday, with 
three first-half penalties and a drop 
goal early in the second half. 

The French made the more seri- 
ous drives at the goal line in the 
first half, but were thwarted by sure 
En glish tackling and iheir own Innlf 
of discipline. 

France finally scored in the 49th 
minute on a penalty by center 
Thierry Lacroix, and got the only 
try of the match two minutes later 
when Abddatif Benazzi plunged 
into the comer with two ladders 
draped over him. 

But Lacroix was denied the 
chance to convert the try when the 
ball fell over during his approach. 
He argued intensely but in vain 
with the Irish referee, Stephen Hil- 
ditcb, and the score stood at 12-8. 

Lacroix then missed two penal- 
ties that could have put France 
ahead, but did kick a penalty in the 
70th minute to make it 12-11. An- 
drew responded three minutes lat- 
er. Again, in the 76th minute, La- 
croix kicked France to within one 
point, with Andrew again replying 
just before the final whistle. 

“This is a huge disappointment,” 
said Bernard Lapasset, head of the 
French Rugby Federation, who 
said the lineup would without 
doubt be changed. 

France’s coach, Pierre Beibizier, 
whose own job may be on shaky 


ground, said, “I have got no criti- 
cism of English rugby. They have 
beaten us regularly so l wouldn't be 
in a good position to criticize 

But, be then added: “The Five 
Nations is dominated by negative 
play — it’s a none-game which does 
not suit France. I'm convinced it is 
not by winning the tournament that 
you are going to worry the Southern 
Hemisphere sides” such as Austra- 
lia, the reigning world champion, 
and the New Zealand AD Blacks. 

“The try will come," said An- 
drew. “There's been too much said 
about the fad we haven't scored a 
try in our last five games. After this 
win we can start to move forward.” 

Ireland 6, Scotland 6c Eric El- 
wood and Gavin Hastings each 
kicked two penalties before about 
30,000 fans at Lansdowne Road in 
Dublin as the Irish failed to follow 
up on their upset of England two 
weeks earlier at Twickenham. 

Elwood, who squandered several 
other p enal ty rhanras, kicked the 
first and last points of the game. 
Hastings's two penalties came early 
in the second naif to give the Scots 
a 6-3 advantage. 

Elwood was first short from 35 
years, despite having a strong 
breeze behind him, when the Scots 
were caught offside following a 
lineout four minutes into the game. 

The fly half’s next kick also was 
short, this time from 45 yards. 

He finally found the target in the 
25 th minute, from an acute angle 
on the right This kick went straight 
between the posts. 

Two minutes into the second 
half, Hastings made it 3-3 with a 
30-yard penalty. 

With the wind behind them, the 
Scots maintained pressure and 
Hastings put them ahead in the 
54th minute with a kick that shaved 
the inside of the left hand post- 

Irish winger Richard W allace 
was tackled by Gregor Townsend 
after making a 40-yard break and 
Elwood kicked his team even nine 
minutes from the end when the 
Scots were penalized in a maul. 

(AP. Reuters; AFP) 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


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SpKJiatt 

SprbnrT 

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SrtMero 

SctHrwt 

SoorrsL 

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to stoodywt _ 355 1%, 

. Stepless .36152 31% 

" StorBc 1.14 3L2 172036 

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UrucO - 900616% 

Stryker X7e J 13877 33% 
Shrt&t _ 378 5% 

Shnos - i m > 

SubMfcr — SOB 7 

S4*eo» im 2X 196g% 
SiteBnro XSe A JlSW 
Suctxrv — 1012 7% 

SolIBnc X8 2.9 »9 Q* 
cuBDnt _ 1151 19% 

Suriito BO 4.1 95021% 

Srtrflopt 2X3 83 172 

SommoF - 

Summas - M 5% 

Sumgph - 1012 7% 

SumBWA X7e X A 8% 

SumHB J4 *J 774920* 
SumfflTX 36 20 7 17% 

SrtrtCrt __ - US®' 4 
SomBHW X8e 9 W* 
SumBTe _ - 6VM 3«% 

SunBnCp .92 3X 22 31 

SuiMc .65303 29% 

sSSSl _ 63S 7% 

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simSvpi I JO 81 agijfc 

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SlSd ^ i^»to 

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CnnLu pH 4fi2 6 

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7% 7% 

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24% 27* 

24 24% —1% 

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11% 11% 

10% 11% *1% 
5* 6% +* 

15* 16 
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53* 53%— 1% 
5* 5* 

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18% 18* 

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16% 16* +% 
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13% 13% 

18% 18% 

4* 5 
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19 V 

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16% 20* +4% 
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8% 11* +2* 
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7* 7% 

13% 14 +% 

2% 2% — % 
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5% 5% — % 
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7% 7* ♦% 
18% 19 ♦ % 

21 % 21 % — % 
18% 70 —1 
13% 13* — % 
16* 17% +% 
2% 3 — % 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 7, 1994 


MONDAY 

SPORTS 

Jordan’s Shadow Hangs Over Another Hopeful 


By Claire Smith 

Ate*- York Turn Service 

SARASOTA Florida — Mike Hoff is 
aot one (o go around saying he wants 10 be 
like Michael. He is not one to demand star 
treatment from football as well as baseball, 
like Ddon Sanders. 

All Mike Huff has ever wanted to be is a 
major-league baseball player. Unfortu- 
nately for Huff, for the second straight 
year be is the player most likely to be 
affected by yet another great experiment 
by the Chicago While Sox, as a player from 
another sport makes a go at baseball. 

in 1993. it was Bo Jackson, the football 


player and baseball player-tumed-medical 
marvel. Jackson returned to the White Sox 
after having an artificial hip implanted 
where his football-ravaged hip used to be. 

That Jackson was obviously limited in 
mobility and effectiveness did not matter. 
That Huff, a once-bright prospect with the 
Los Angeles Dodgers, was viewed as quite 
possibly the Quintessential multifaceted 
utility player, also did not matter. 

Huff, who plays the outfield and infield, 
bit over .400 in exhibition games. The 
White Sox shipped him cut. 

Now Huff is back, after having batted 
294 with Gass AAA Nashville. And again 


he is caught squarely in the middle of 
another sensationalized tryout, this one in- 
volving Michael Jordan. 

“It's a little embarrassing.” Jordan said 
erf the applause he gets. “The real ball- 
players are the ones who*ve proven them- 
selves. I haven't. I don't want to overshad- 
ow the guys. I want to fit in." 

Against the background of Nike banners 
waving and fans swooning, is it any wonder 
that a “real” ballplayer might be con- 
cerned? Especially if being more polished 
counts little against spectacular marketme 


opportunities? This is Huffs predicament. 
“Obviously there are times you think 


about it more than you should, and you get 
depressed," said Huff, a soft-spoken grad- 
uate of Northwestern University. “But I 
try not to think about it in terms of who 
I'm up against, whether it is Michael Jor- 
dan or Greg Tubbs or Allen Battle. I’m just 
out to do the best I can. And it helps that I 
feel if I don’t make the ball dub that there 
are 25 guys who are pretty dog-gone good 
going with the team.” 

This winter. Huff was the one White Sax 
player more than any other who spent time 
working out with Jordan. He likes Jordan, 
saying that it is near-impossible not to. 

Jordan appreciate Huff's effort “Mike 


and I have talked about it and, like him, I 
don’t consider it a one-on-one thing,” Jor- 
dan said. “You do the best that you can 
and let the coaches evaluate the outfield. 
But we remain good friends, and he's been 
very helpful teaching me the game.” 

Still Huff has not lost the ability to 
count He and Jordan are two of the 13 
outfielders in camp. The bubble could 
burst for Huff again. If it does, he says he 
will request a trade. 

*Tm not just a young kid anymore,” said 
Huff, who will turn 31 in August “I have a 
family I have to think about- 


The First RBI (if Slightly Tainted) 

The Aaocmed Pros 

PORT CHARLOTTE, Florida — Michael Jordan, in his first spring 
r rsTTring start, drove in his first run, with a sacrifice fly, and scored hki 
first run, but went 0-for-3 in a 15-7 victory over the Texas Rangers. 

After striking out and grounding out twice, Jordan came to the 
plate in the seventh inning Saturday with the bases loaded and one 
out. He lunged at a 1-2 pitch from Cris Carpenter, lofting a weak fly 
ball to center that Oddibe McDowell hobbled for an error. Jordan 
was credited with a sacrifice fly and an RBI as pinch runner Ray 
Durham scored from third. Clemente Alvarez’s grand dam that 
drove in Jordan, who began his trot at break-neck speed. 

“Y ou always think of the Mighty Casey stepping up with the bases 
loaded and he strikes out,” Jordan said. “I just wanted to maty 
contact." 

Defensively, he caught three fly balls deanly. 


(vK ! r 

» e ; 
foil ».* 




IARD 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W L 

Pd 

G0 

New York 

38 19 

567 

— 

Orlando 

34 22 

MI 

3te 

Miami 

32 25 

561 

6 

New Jersey 

29 28 

509 

9 

Boston 

71 36 

J6B 

17 

Pniladetphlo 

20 38 

545 

ibvj 

Washington 

18 40 

Central DfvtsJoa 

510 

70V, 

Atlanta 

41 16 

.71 9 

— 

Chicago 

37 20 

049 

4 

Cleveland 

34 24 

586 

7W 

Inokma 

30 26 

536 

tow 

Charlotte 

23 33 

X\2 

I7W 

Milwaukee 

17 40 

-298 

24 

□eiroi! 

t3 44 

528 

23 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 



W L 

Pet 

G6 

Houston 

40 IS 

.727 

— 

San Antonio 

41 17 

707 

K 

Utah 

40 19 

■678 

2 

Denver 

28 28 

MO 

12te 

Mlnnesoia 

16 40 

-2M 

24V, 

Dallas 

8 5D 

Pacific Division 

.138 

33te 

Seattle 

41 14 

.745 



Phoenix 

37 18 

673 

4 

Peril ond 

36 22 

621 

6te 

GaWen State 

34 23 

■SVt 

8 

LA. Lakers 

21 35 

J75 

29W 

Sacramento 

19 37 

539 

22V, 

LA. Clippers 

19 38 

533 

23 

FRIDA ITS RESULTS 


New Jersey 

16 29 

23 

33—118 

Indiana 

33 31 

31 

18—136 


NJ : Morris 4-5 6-8 17, Newman 8-163-3 20; | : 
McKay 9-lt 6-7 24. Scott 3-5 10-11 14. fte- 
boands— New Jersey 47 (Brown 6). Indiana 51 
(K-Wnilams 111. Assists— New Jersey l» (An- 
derson 61, mdkXM 28 (Workman 7]. 

LA Lakers 30 24 17 28— 99 

Boston 27 21 M 27— 1W 

LA: Div«:7-i7ft51P,VonExalP-ia2-326;B: 
Radio IS- 22 6-3 36. Brawn 9-13 2-2 22. Re- 
bounds-Las Angeles 50 (DIvae 11 1. Boston 60 
(Radio 151, Assists— Los Angeles 21 (Ttirootf 
8), Boston 23 (Douglas 8). 

LA Clbipers 28 35 38 20—112 

Son Antonio M 33 28 26—121 

LA: WllkJm 13-264-631 KEMs 8-13 1-1 17; S: 
D-Ellb 9-13 1-1 22. RotMman 14-21 13-1441. Re- 
bound*— Las Anodes 46 (wnuns Tll.SanAn- 
tonloss (Robinson 161. Assists— Los Angefes 33 
(Jackson 91. son Antonio 30 (Del Neon 91. 
Pontaad 31 29 28 26-115 

Clllcaoo II 23 20 22— 96 

P: CRotUnson 5-15 7-9 18. Droxler 11-19 1-4 
27; C: Plppen 10-19 (HI 22. Blount 7-13 3-6 17. 
R eb ou nd s— Portland 58 (B.W1lllains 14), Chi- 
cago 61 (Blount 15). Assist s— Po r tland 26 
(Strkkkmd 11). Chlcoga 26 (Myers. Karr 6). 
Orlando IS 3B 23 73— K 

Denver II 17 35 28-98 

O: O'Neal 9-23 4-10 2X Hardaway 9-21 4423; 
D: Ellis 5-16 8-10 18. R.W1l|laina 8-14 2-2 20. 
Rebound s — Ortondoal (O’Neal 161, Denver 66 
(Mutambo ID). Assists— Orlando 11 (Ander- 
son 4), Denver 20 (AMut-Rnuf. Pack 6). 
Minnesota 26 26 27 23-101 

Pt»«nl* 34 29 31 23-106 

M: Kins 6-12 7-7 19, Rider 8-144-5 21; P: Green 
541 8-8 18, Goballa 11-19 7-10 29- Rcfaaundfr- 
Mlnnesaki 45 ( Kins 7). Phoenix SB (Groan 11). 
Aulst*— Minnesota 26 (Loettner, Rider, 
Smith, Person 5), Phoenix 36 (KJohnson 7). 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
LA Lakers 27 30 is 26—111 

WasMaetoo 3V 32 34 39-134 

LA: Dlvac 9-17 44 22, Threat! 13-21 M 32; w: 
Gwitotto 11-15 34 25. MocLean KM6 44 24, 
Chapmon 10-17 34 22. Adams 10-18 34 29. Re- 
bounds— Los Amies 46 (oivae 14), wasMng- 
hxin (GuaJMta 13). Astfste-Las Angeles 9 
(Dlvac7. Van Exol 7),wastikshn26(Adamsl). 
Philadelphia 22 19 3» 10- a 

Miami 32 28 34 36-138 

P: Berras 6-13 2-2 15, J -Malone 10-17 1-221; 
M; Rice 13-31 3-2 32. Selkalv 9-13 4fl 32. Re- 
bound*— Philadelphia 49 ( Edwards 8), Miami 
53 (Long U). Assists— Philadelphia 14 (Bar- 
rel 5). Miami 29 (Smith, snow 7). 

Indiana 26 25 18 19— 88 

Alfalfa 23 16 38 23- f« 

l: MeKev 7-13 34 17. Miller 7-14 3-3 18; A: 


Manning 6-15 H 17, Willis 11-21 0-2 22. Re- 
bounds— Indiana 50 (DDovb 9). Atlanta 53 
(Manning 12). Assists— Indiana 20 (MeKev 6). 
A 11 hi ta 22 (Blaylock 101. 

Utah 27 23 34 19 — 103 

Danas 25 24 23 »— 90 

U : Malone 1421 6-7 34. Harnocek 8-14 1-1 17; 
D: Washburn B-19 4-7 22. Jackson 414 8-10 20. 
Rebounds— Utah 51 (Malone 131, Dallas 51 
(williams 13)- Assists — Utah 37 (Stockton 15). 
Dallas SI (Jackson 9), 

LA Clippers 25 27 23 33—187 

Houston 30 28 XT 29—124 

LA: Outlaw 49 SO 17. Wilkins 9-23 2-3 20; H: 
otafuwan 13-19 45 30. Smith 10-13 2-2 24. Re- 
bounds— Los Anodes 50 (Outlaw it), Houston 
50 (Olaluwon 12). AssMS— Las Angelos Z7 
(Jackson 10). Houston 32 (Maxwel) 9). 
Detroit 19 39 32 11—' M 

MJTwookee 31 » 30 27—117 

D: Comers 1425 44 42, Thomas 414 47 17; 
M; Baker 9-16 413 24, Murdock 8-15 11-11 2L 
Rebounds— Detroit 54 (Chi I cult 13). Milwau- 
kee 51 (Baker 10). Assists— Detroit 2Bcnwm- 
as )0). Milwaukee 31 (Murdock ll). 
Sacramento 29 30 19 20— 98 

Seattle 29 26 34 25—114 

S: Tisdale 7-17 6-6 20, webb 10-14 0-021; SI: 
Gill 413 44 71. Kerne 1416 5-7 25. Rebounds— 
Sacramento 42 (Pol mice 8), Seattle 46 (Kemp 
14). Assist*— Sacramento 28 (Richmond 8). 
Seattle 27 (Favtan 8). 

Charlotte 30 27 28 35—112 

Golden State 38 39 27 33—129 

C: Wingate 7-11 0-2 15. Curry 10-1840 21; G: 
Sorewetl 8-23 3421. Mullln 5-9 44 14 Graver 9-10 
2* 2d Rebounds— Charlotte SB (Hawkins 12). 
Golden State M (Owens 9). Assists— charlotte 
29 (Booties 8), GoMbi State 36 (AJohnson 10). 

Major College Scores 

FRIDAYS RESULTS 
Brown 65. Harvord 60 
Yale 63. Dartmouth 55 
Idaho 59. Bo Me SI. 56 

TOURNAMENTS 
Big South Conference 
First Round 

Campbell 79. Wbithran 71 
Liberty 82, Charleston Southern 71 
Radford 81. ML-Bolflmare County 78 
Tawsan St. 64, N.C-Ashevllte 56 
East Coast Conf er ence 
First Round 

Buffalo KM. Cent Connecticut SI. 62 
Hafstra 86. Chicago St. 77 

N orth e ast Confere nce 
Semifinals 

Monmouth. NJ. 74 Robert Morris 61 
Rider 83. Wagner 75 

Ohio Valley Conference 

Tmiielfleeiola 

Murray St. (04 Moretvead St 86 
Tennes se e St. 91, Tennessee Tech 74 
Patriot League 
First Round 
Colgate 87, Lehigh 80 
Holy Cress 94 Buckneli 91 
Lafayette 83. Fordham 65 
Navy 94 Army 84 

Southern Conference 
Quarterfinals 
Davidson 71. VMI 61 
Georgia Southern 85, Appalachian St. 60 
TdrChattanoaga 85, Furman 81 
W. Carolina 79. E. Tennessee St 78 
Southland Conference 
First Round 

Ne Louisiana 92, Steuben F-Ausfin 73 
Nlchoits st. 101. Taxas-San Antonia 89 
North Texas 69. McNecse St. 65 
SW Texas 5t. 65. Sam Houston St 56 
Son Belt Caatareacs 
First Round 
ArtL-LUtte Rock 78, Lamar 71 
Texas-Pan American 74 Louisiana Tech 65 
Trans America Athletic Co nference 
Semifinals 

Cent. Florida 93. Centenary 89 
Stetson 54 Samford 42 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
EAST 

Connecticut 9SL St. John'S 80 
Dartmouth 73. Brown 62 
Providence 77, Boston College 69 
Solon Hall 84 Pittsburgh 54 
Vlllanova BX Miami 63 
Yale 72. Harvard 67 

SOUTH 

Atev-Blrmlngham 85. St. Louis 70 
Alabama 83. Auburn 68 
Coooln SL 93. Dataware St 42 


Florida 82, Tennessee 71 
Georgia Tech 90. Cletnsan 79 
Maryland 74 Virginia 48 
Mississippi 93, LSU 78 
Maroon St. 7 5, Howard U. 73 
N. Carolina A8.T 104 S. Carolina St. 98 
N. Carolina St. 71. Wake Forest 63 
North Carolina 87. Duke 77 
South Carolina 74 Kentucky 74 
Tutane 83. Southern Miss. S3 
Va. Commo nw ea tt ti 91. South Florida BO 
Vanderbilt 67. Georgia 57 
MIDWEST 

Bowling Green 78. Toledo 77 
Cent Michigan 73. Kent 68 
Do Paul 44 Memphis St. 53 
E. Michigan 54 Akron 46 
Illinois 84. Penn St. 59 
Marquette 74 Wb. -Milwaukee 51 
Miami. Ohio 70, W. Michigan 63 
Minnesota 107. Iowa 94 30 T 
Missouri 80. Nebraska 78 
Northwestern 64 Wisconsin 54 
Noire Dame 72. Dayton 66 
Ohio U. 91, Sal) St. 76 

SOUTHWEST 

Arkansas 80. Mississippi St. 62 
Baylor 74 Southern Mem. 6* 

Houston 74 Rice 76 
Oklahoma St. S3, Colorado it 
Texas VU. Texas Christian 78 
Texas Tech 89. Texas A&M 80 
FAR WEST 

Air Force 74 Colorado St 66 

Arizona 84 Washington St. 69 

Arizona SI. 71 Washington 55 

Cal St-Fulierfon 79, UC Santa Barbara *3 

California 74 Oregon St. 44 

Fresno St. 73. Wyoming 68 

Idaho St 64 idrtw a 3 

Long Beoch St. 91. UC Irvine 72 

Montana 74 Montana St 55 

N. Arizona 74 Weber St 76 

5. Utah 82. Mo.-Kansas City 79 

San Diego St 84 Hawaii 74 

5an Jose St. 71, New Mexico St. 67, OT 

Slardord 84 Oregon 76 

Texos-El Paso 64 Brigham Young 61 

Utah 79, New Mexico 72 

Utah St. 71. Nevada 59 

TOURNAMENTS 
All antic 10 Conference 
First Round 

St Joseph’s 94 St. Banaventure 83 
BM Sooth Conference 
Sam (floats 

comobeu 72. Radford 61 
Liberty 61 Tdwwui St. 56 

Colonial AfMettc AsMCfaftan 
First Roand 

James Mod Ison 84 American U. 67 
N.C.-Wllmlngk* 1 104 George Mason 97, OT 
OM Dominion 83. William & Mary 58 
Richmond 54 East Carol I no 55 
East Coat Conference 
SemHIoats 
Hcfstru 94 Trov St. 89, OT 
NE Illinois 84 Buffalo SL 20T 

Metre Attanfic Athletic c onf erence 
First Round 
Canbha 59. Ntogara 45 
Loyola Met 87. St. Peter's 84 OT 
Manhattan 99. Iona 65 
Siena 84 Fairfield 73 

Missouri Valley Conference 
First Round 

Bradley 52. Wichita St 44 
N. Iowa 84 Illinois SL 70 
S. Illinois 52. SW Missouri St. ® 

Tulsa 9), Drake 82 

Norib Atlantic Conference 
First Round 

Drexul 8), Northeastern 71 
Hartford 92. Boston U. 76 
Maine 77, Vermont 75 
New Hampshire 84 Delaware 67 
owe Volley Co nferenc e 
Cborngtomblp 

Tennessee St. 73. Murray st. 72 
Patriot League 
SemMAsis 

Colgate 74 Lofovette 73 
Navy 94 Holy Crass 91, OT 

southern Conference 
Semifinals 
Davidson 9% W. Carolina 89 
Tn. -Chattanooga 99. Georgia Southern 91, OT 
Southland Conference 
semlfinote 

North Texas 77, NE LouMcma 74 
SW Texas St 64 Nlchoits St. 65 


Sun Belt Canfereita 
OoarterfiMta 

Jacksonville 64 Arkansas St. 55 
New Orleans 64 South Alabama 60 
SW Louisiana 81, Texas-Pan American 60 
W. Kentucky 72, Artc-uttle Rock 69 
Trans America Athletic Conference 
CbanwrtoraWP 
Cent. Florida 74 Stetson 67 

West Coast Conference 
First Round 

Gonzoga 91, Loyoia Mary mount 76 
Peoperdlne 79. St. Marys, col. 62 
Son Diego 63. Portland 57 
San Francisco 74 Santa Clara 74 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 

W L T PTS OF GA 


N.Y. Rangers 

42 

18 

S 

89 

234 

172 

New Jersey 

36 

20 

9 

81 

237 

179 

Washlnglon 

31 

27 

7 

69 

206 

192 

Ptilladetphlo 

29 

31 

5 

63 

227 

246 

Florida 

26 

28 

10 

63 

178 

180 

N.Y. Islanders 

27 

30 

7 

61 

717 

206 

Tampa Bay 25 34 8 

Northeast Dlvtstan 

5B 

180 

198 

Boston 

35 

19 

11 

11 

222 

180 

Montreal 

34 

22 

9 

77 219 

IBS 

Pittsburgh 

31 

21 

12 

74 

227 

225 

Buffalo 

33 

26 

7 

73 

220 

174 

Quebec 

25 

34 

5 

55 206 321 

Hartford 

22 

37 

7 

51 

182 

223 

Ottawa 

10 

49 

8 

28 

161 

313 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central Division 



W 

L 

T Ph GF 

QA 

Detroit 

38 

21 

5 

81 

282 

219 

Toronto 

35 

20 

11 

81 

220 

189 

Dallas 

34 

23 

8 

76 

226 

204 

St. Louis 

32 

25 

g 

72 

209 

214 

Chicago 

30 

27 

7 

67 

191 

179 

Winnipeg 

19 

40 

8 

46 

200 

272 


Partite Divfxioa 




Calgary 

32 

25 

10 

74 

240 212 

Vancouver 

32 

29 

3 

67 

217 207 

San Jose 

23 

30 

13 

58 

182 

214 

Anaheim 

25 

36 

5 

55 

186 

203 

Las Angeles 

22 

34 

9 

53 

235 

254 

Edmonton 

18 

48 

10 

46 

208 

251 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 
Pllt SUl T Uh 0 1 0-1 

Buffalo 8 2 0-2 

Second Period: B-Khmvtev 19. P-Jogr 36 
(Murphy, Lctnloux) (pp); B-Munl 2 QOimy- 
iev. Badger) (sh). Shots on goaf: P 446-24 B 
12-14-6 — 32 Goalies — P. Bcrrasso. B, Fuhr, 
N.Y. tetemters 8 2(0—5 

N.Y. Rangers 3 8 0 0-2 

First Period: R-Gartner 36 (Leetdi. Ky- 
preos); R-Amante 15; R-Zubev. 10 (Graves, 
Messier) (pp). Second Period: 1-MclmH 19 
( Kurvers. PUon); l-Klng 24 ( Fkitley, Ferrara). 
Third Period: l-KIna 25 (Thamax Turaeon). 
Shots on goal: I.IM-UW-3J; R. 13-7-123-35. 
Goalies— L Hextolt McLennan. R, Richter. 
Hartford 1 1 0-2 

Florida 0 0 1—1 

First Parted; H-Horklns 1 (Potvin. Pragp). 
Second Ported: H-Sandereon 33 (Vcrbaofc. 
Nvtandar). Third Period: F-Ntedarmaver 9 
(Fitzgerald. Suveryn). Shots oa goal: H 11-10- 
10-31. F 9-10-19-34 Goallss-H. Burke. F, 
Vanbiesbrouck. 

Toronto 2 13 1-6 

Detroit 3 110-5 

First Period: T-GUmour 24 (Mironov); T- 
Ciark 34 (Mironov, Gllmour) (pp); D-Fedanw 
45 (Kaziov, McCarty): D-Sheppord 46 (Yzer- 
moa Chtasson) (pp); D-Fedornv 46 (Kozlov). 
Second Period: D-Yconwui 11 1 Fedorov); T- 
Ctark as (EUeft, Mironov) (pp). Third Parted: 
T-Mocoun 3 (Andreychuk, Sacco) (pp) ; T-Soc- 
cn 1 (EUett) (on); D-Oropar 3 (Udstraml. 
Orerfime: Toronto, Ctok 36 (Gllmour, Mir- 
onov). Shots oa goal: T 9-136-1-29. D 16-W-14- 
1—41. Goalies— T, Potvin. O. Osgood. 
PhU a detpblg 2 8 10-2 

Washington 3 0 • 8-3 

First Period: P-Galtey 9 id Ween, RocchlJ 
(pg); W-Khrtsttch 36 (Hunter, Johansson): 
W-Ptvonko II (Kcnowalehuk, lofrate) (pp); 
W-Bondra 22 (Khrtstlch, Anderson); P-Urv 
drai 34 Third Period: P-Gai ley 10 (Renberg, 
Undrae). Shots an gaol: P 144-6-0—24 w 10- 
10-11-3-34. Goalies— P, RousseL ChaboL 
RousseL W. Btoupra. 


Winnipeg 7 S •— * 

Ottawa 8 B 1-1 

First Period: W-MIronov 6 (King). Second 
Period: W-£menon2S IDoml. Mironov); W- 
Tkachuk 33 l Shaman, McBean) (pp); W- 
Zhamnov 22 (Emerson, Ukmav); w-Shonnon 
13 (Tkactnik. Zhamonvl (bp); W-Steen 17 
( Romnl uk. LeOiancl ; (pp). Tbbd Period: O- 
McUwaln 14 (Davydov. Yashin). Shot* on 
eool: W 12-19-7—340 11-147— 24 Gaafies— W. 
Essensa O. BllKngtan. Lafarest. 

Vancouver 2 • 3— 4 

hn flw | 0 0 1—1 

First Period: V -Carson W (Gellnax Bure) 
(pp) ; V-Bura 19 (Craven, Gertnas). Third Peri- 
od: OOahlen 18 (Modana iMutvtchuk); V-G. 
Courtnad 34 I Unden, Babycti): V^tear 2 (MC- 
I ntyre.Murrvn ). Shots on goal : Vll-9-1 1—31. D 
6-1411—27. Goal lee— V, Whitmore: D. Moog- 

Edmoatpa 1 t 0—1 

Anaheim I 2 1 — 4 

First Period: E-OJauason 7 (Clger. Weight) 
(pp): A-ooiias9 (Sacco), second Period: A- 
Sweenev 12 (Yoke. Wliftoms): A-Willtons 3. 
Third Period: A-Sacca M I Femer, Williams) 
(pp). Shots an goaf : E 49-7—25. A 3-tl-l 1—25. 
Goalies — E. Ronford. A. Hebert. 

SATURDAYS RESULTS 
Calgary 1 1 1-3 

New Jersey 1 4 1—6 

First Ported: NJ.-Lemleux 15 (Stevens. 
Nledenmayer); C-Fleurv 28 (Robert* ReF 
cheO. Second Period: C-Suter 4 (Relabel. 
Fieury) (PP)-' N J. -Zelepuk In 23 (Stevcm. /All- 
ien) (pp); NJ.-MocLean 31, NJ.-Richer 24 
INtriiolls, Mac Lem I (po); NJ.-Richer 25 
t Honk). Thtrd Period: Nj.-zeiepu)cln24 (Mc- 
Kay. Hollk); C-TItsv 23 (sh). Shots oa goal: C 
13-11-10 — 34. NJ. 7-145-22. GaoJIes-C Ver- 
non. Kidd. NJ„ Brodeur. 

N.Y. Rangers 2 I 2—5 

N.Y. I Danders 2 2 0-4 

First Period: R-Graves 45 (Kovolov, 
Weils); r -G raves M (Lowe, Zubov); (-Ferra- 
ro 14 (Kasparaitis); l-Mcinnls2D (Lachance, 
Kasporattfs) (pp). Second Period: l-Turgeon 
25 (Kurvers. Plion); R-Kovotov 10 (Messier. 
Leefcfi); l-Hpgue 29 (Rattev, Ferrara) (pp). 
TNrd Period: R-Beukeboom 6; R-Zubav 11 
(Graves. Larmar) (pp). Shots oa goal: N.Y. 
Rangers 8-12-15-25. N.Y. islanders 49-3—24 
Goalies— R, Rlctiter. Heaty. I. HextalL 
Ottawa 8 10—1 

Boston 2 3 1—6 

First Period: BOates26 (Juneau); B-Neetv 
48 ( Dotes. BeureueJ. Second Period: O- 
McLhvafnl5(Pavnter,Lauer) (pp) ; B-Kwtal- 
nov 10 (Neely, Oates); B-Oonoto 18 (Bourque, 
Smollnskl); BWkxray 10 (Slumpel. Sweeney); 
Third Period: B-HugheslO(Bouraue.Stumpel) 
(PP). Shuts on goal’. O 6-7-7-24 B 16-144-36. 
Goalies— O, La Fores*. B. Rlendeau. 

Hartford 8 2 4-2 

Tampa Bay 113-4 

Second Period: T-OIMola t (Dutresna. 
Chambers); rt-Verbeek 32 (Ny lander. Pat- 
rttk) (pp); It P ran g er 4. Third Period: T- 
Savord 12 (Dufresne. Gallant); T-Gollant 4 
t Savant Bradley); (pp). T-Cdte 17 (Savard, 
Tucker) ( pp). Shots ou goat : HS-IW-23.T 12- 
12-15—39. Goalies— H, Burke. T, Pvppo. 
Toronto 0 1 0—1 

Ouebec 8 2 2-4 

Secoad Period: O-Sakfc 21 (Kovalenko) ;D- 
Leschyshyn JtSoWc. Rudnsky) (pp» T-GU- 
mour 25 (Clark, Mironov). Third period: Q- 
Stedln 1 (Saklc Norris); (pp). Q-Sbnon 4 
(Sutter). Shots ea goal: T M46—34. g 49- 
•—25. Goa 1 1 os— T, Potvla a Flsot 


Satordarh Results 
Kansas Clhr ll. Houston 7 
St. Louts 11, Baltimore 4 
Cleveland 10, Detroit 3 
Boston 9, Minnesota 5 
Las Angeles 6, Florida 5 
Atlanta a Montreal 2 
Pittsburgh 5. Clnctmxrtl 4 
Chicago White Sax 15, Texas 7 
PtniodetPhla 9. Taranto 4 
New York Yankees 8. New York Mats 0 
Seattle 7. Son Diego D 
Oakland 8. Milwaukee 0 
Chicago Cubs W. ColHornla 7 
San Francteo ll. Colorado 2 

7 ' ' TSStSKSSSB- 


text West Ham, 3; Everton and (nswfch, 36; 
Totfenham ana Chelsea, 32; Southampton 31; 
Manc h ester aty. 30; Oldham. 27; Sheffield 
United and Swindon. 24. 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Marseille 3, Ulte 2 
Toulouse ft Auxerre 0 
Nantes L Lyon 0 
Bordeaux 2. Strasbourg 0 
St Etleme Z Montpellier 0 
Comes Z Metz 0 
Monaco X Caen 0 
Lens Z Sacbaux 0 
Ur Havre Z Angers 1 
Parts SL Germain Z Martteues 2 
S tanding s: Parts- SG, 44 eotnts; Marseille, 
40; Nantes and Bordeaux, 35; Auxerre, 34; 
CmnezS; Mamm Lens and Nlartl»eHtar,32i 
Sahd-Etiennz Strasbourg, Lyea 29; Sactwux. 
27; Metz, 26; Le Havre, 34.- Caea 23; Lille, 22; 
Morfigties. 20; Angers and Toulouse. 17. 
GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 


^ R ^I^Wfl^ LT5 ^Metz.26;Le Havre, 34; C 

Stem Graf (1). Germany, del Helena So- 1 

kovo (5). Czech Republic 7-5. 64; Arantxa _ , 

Sanchez Vlcarto (2). 5aain,clef. Chanda Rutdn 1 

| 1 j| J InTte^ Ekfi— j re / * DVIiO/tH3 DfCStfOfl 1/ PC COlOCM I 

(14), untied SWe5. 6Z 64. Borer Leverkusen 0. Brmto Moenchnali 

^ , L r i , VtB Stuttgart 4. Hamburg SV 0 

Morton BwicffTxrf, WfTherknxliflfKl l It f coo tun ■ ■i rt ,ir- l *> niwifin nn.1 nu> «■ 

Sukova (2). Czeetr Republic art. Amanda 

Coetzer, South Africa and ines Gorrachate- rr^ 

arf (4). Am«tlfinQ f 6-2.4-^6-7; Jffim N ov ato Q* ^ ^WrWJUWm 0 

^ Mo^ Z Yterdw Brmwn 0 


<l),5pa!a<W.L«1McNeH. United Stotecand J* EUttr ? ch> . 3 


Rermoe Stubbs U), Australia, 6-4. 6-7 (7-61,6-1. 

nuMPiniR cup Dutsbura, 22: ElntrazM Frankfurt, 28; FC 

Sfet Z umiRMh KabtreteuTern, Kortsruhe SC and Hamburg 

TTfij -junLimuiH *V, 27; Bayer Leverkusen and Werder Bre- 
petesamprasd). united Statesrdet. Stefan 

United States. 6-4 64. 

rwiHiri tPiHlflnnfi uUAilxCf Jit 1^- NUFnMJPift i/pWaiMn 

Grant ConneaConackuand Patrick Gafteatth ****• 

(2). United Stales, det Darren QMil and John /TA iJAN firs t division 

FUzgerakL Australia. 76 (86), 76 fMI; Bvron i 

BlodLZImbdbncand JonathmSfark {l).U<riF 

■d States, drt John-LafinteAtJamr amt Kevin ,nterT w“«wie of Milan 1. u«nes 
01 JuvmtraatTtain & AC Miten 1 


Mediterranean Open 


Sores otter the firm! round Of 845X880 toer- 


(Rteraozlanale of Milan 1. Udlnese a 
Juventus of Turin a AC Mllm 1 
Lazio of Rome vs. Rama (n) 

Lecce ft Napoli 1 
Piacenza 1. Genoa 1 
R eool o na vs. Parma (suspended) 
Sompdaria of Genoa 1, Torino 0 
Standtam: AC Milan. 42; Smrwdorta 34; 
Jurentux 34; Parma 33; Lazte.31; Inter, 28; 
Torino and NopoU, 27; Faggia and CoallorL 


narnanl on 0wA0»-rard (6,127-nster) Vtlto- 26: Piacenza 23; Roma C re mone s e and Gm- 


omrtfa Goff Club la Tereevfela Spain: 
Jam Marla OfaznbaL Spafa 7065-71-70-276 
Paul McGinley, Iretona 74886474-276 
Peter Baker, England, 73-716569-278 
Gordon J. Brand. England. 606470-74-278 
Robert Allenbv. Australia 706471-74-279 
Ktes Eriksson. Sweden, 67-72-7470-279 
Tony Johnstone, Zimbabwe, 64606475-279 
Juan Quires, Spata 67-67-71-75-280 
PWI GakBrs. England, 6473-74W-2BD 
Robert Knrtssaa Sweden, 7268-71-70-281 
Miguel Ansel Jimenez. Spate. 1469-7472-281 
De Wet Bassan. South Africa 71696473-281 


Soccer 


Major League Scores 

PRE-SEAS ON EXH IBITION GAMES 
Friday’s Games 
Houston X Cincinnati 3 
Philadelphia 7, Pittsburgh j 
Bataan Css) 9, Atlanta ft 10 Integra 
Florida 9, Konsos City 6 
5). Louts 5. Minnesota 4 
Texas 9. Chicago white Sox B 
Detroit ix cievetmd 5 
Las Angeles ft Now York Mete 1 
Toronto ft Baltimore 5, 10 Innings 
Oilcego Cubs 7, San Francisco 2 
ColHornla 7, Colorado 6 
Seattle 9, 5on Dleoo 6 
Milwaukee 4. Oakland ft 10 Innings 
Boston (k) IZ Boston Coflege 1 


DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Willem ll Tdtxirg ft vw Vonto o 
MW Maastricht L Rada JC Kerkrode 0 
CAE. Deventer L F eye n oord Rotterdam 1 
A lax Artiste! dam ft Cambuur L e euwar d en 2 
FC Votandam ft RKC Waalwilk 1 
Soaria Rotterdam ft FC Utrecht 2 
FC Groningen ft NAC Breda 0 
Vitesse Arnhem ft PSV Eindhoven 0 
Standing*: a lax. 42 paints; F eyenoord, 37; 
PSV. 31; Vitesse and NAC 29; Willem II, 27; 
Rode JC 26; FCTw*nte25;MW.34; Sparta 
ond (ftA. Eagles, 23; FC Utrecht, 21; VW and 
Hee ren vce ra 20; FC G r on i ngen. 16; Volen- 
dom. 15; CamDuur, 12; RKC 10. 

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Btacttum ft Liverpool a 
Everton 2. Oldham 1 
IPBNtzh 1, Arsenal 5 
Leeds ft Southampton 0 
Manchester United ft Chelsea 1 
Queens Park Rangers l. Manchester aty 1 
Sheffield Wednesday ft Newcastle 1 
Swindon l, WWf Ham 1 
Tottenham Z Sheffield United 2 
Wlmbtedsn ft Norwich 1 
Coventry ft Aston VHIa l 
Standings: Manchester united. 68 petals; 
Blackburn. 64; AraenaL 54; N e wcas t l e, 51; 
Aston villa, 49; Laeds.48; Uvsrpoo!,47; Shef 
field Wednesda y and NorwtcJv 44; Queens 
Park Rangers. 68: WWnUedan, 9h Coretfiry 


oa 22; Udlnese, 21; Reggkma, 18; AtohmkL 
17; Lecce, 9. 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Looranes 1, Cetta 1 
Ltefdo Z Real Madrid 1 
Racing de Sa n tander 4, Real Soctedad 1 
Atlettoo de Madrid ft Albocete a 
Oviedo 1. Barcelona 3 
VOJiadolld Z Osawno 1 
Raya Valtecana z Snorting de GDen 1 
Deportlvo de La Coruna 1, Zaragoza 1 
Athletic de Bflboo Z Valencia I 
Tenerife Z Sevilla 1 

StaecSnes: Deportlvo La Coruna 39 points; 
Barcelona 38; Real Madrid, 34; Athletic de 
BfibaaSl; Zaragoza 30; Seville and Tenerife, 
29; Racing de Santander. Albaoeteand Sport- 
ing deGfion. 28; Real Soctedad, 27; Valencia 
26; Ovtedo.25; Celtaand Rovo Valtecana 24; 
Attettco de MadrM. 23; Logranes. 22; Ltekla 
and Valladolid, 20; Ososuna 17. 


CRICKET 


FIRST CRICKET TEST 
South Africa's vs. AesMta 
Secuiid Day. Satarday, la J idi a n neibirp 
Australia 1st Innings: 248 (67J overs) 
South Africa 2nd Innings 42-nane (19 overs) 
TMtd Day, Sanday, In Jehamwehure 
South Africa 1st tarings 251 
Austral la 1st Inn tags 248 
South Africa and Innings: 335-5 (109 overs) 
ONE DAY INTERNATIONAL 
West Indies tv Esstced 
Saturday ta Port-of-Spam, Trinidad 
west Indies: 2647 (455 overs) 

England: 1949 (36 overs) 

West Indies won on fOeterscortna rate and 
win series 41. 


West Indies: 2549 (5D overs) 

SECOND ONE DAY INTERNATIONAL 
Pafdstaa w New Zealand 
Sunday, ta AUCKLAND, Now Zealand 
Pakistan: 146 (433 overs) 

New Zealand: 110 (44J avers) 

Result’. Pakistan wen by 38 ninv 


ICC TROPHY THIRD PLACE PLAY-OFF 
Holland vs. Bermuda 
Satarday In N airobi 
Holland: 306-2 (50 avers) 

Bermuda: 20410 (422 overs) 

Holland auafiflra tar 1996 World Cup, beat- 
ing Bermuda tn 103 runs. 


SKIING • ; vV- y 


MENS DOWNHILL 

Results Satarday iron men's downhill te 
Aspea: 1, Cary Mullen Canada,! minute, 3U1 
seconds; ZAttoSkaardal, Norway. 1:3321; ft 
Pietro Vital W, Italy, i:3&28; A Ed Podavta- 
■sky. Canada 1:3850; 5, Fmz Hetazer, Swtt- 
zerionL 1:3859; ft Francs Cavegn, Switzer, 
land. 1:3878; 7, Markus Freer. Lichtenstein. 

1 :3UO: ft Jean-Luc cretler. France. 1:3881 ; 

9, Werner Per o thonor, Hedy, 1 J8J0; W. me 
Alptord. France, 1:3891. 

Standings ta the event: 1. Marc Giranteiil 
Luxembourg, 484 points; 2, Patrick Orlfieft 
Austria 404; ft Cary Mullen, Canada. 384; C 
Hamm* Trtnkle, Austria 376; 5. winiam . 
BeeeaSwltzerlond,306;ftAtleSkoardaLNar “ 
way, 299; 7, Kietll Andre Aamedl, 257; ft Pie--' 
fro VttoUnf, Italy. 254; 9, Ed PodovVHsky, Can- 
ada, 2S0; 1ft Daniel Mahrer.Swnzertanftm 
MENS GIANT SLALOM 

ResaNson Sunday In Aspen: ft Fredrik nv- 
betg , Sweden, I minute 51 36 seconds : Z Chris- 
tken Moyer, Austria 1:5146; ft Motion Bet- 
frond, Italy, 1:5150; 4, Franck Piccard. 
France, 1:5153; 5. Urs KaeUa Swtteerlaid. 
1:5167; ft Aberto Tomba Italy, 15157; 7. 
Gerhard Koentasralrer. Italy, 15Z03; ft Kle- 
Hl Andre AOmodt, Norway, 15ZU; 9, Tobias 
Bamer s soL Germany, 15220; 1ft Mtehael 
Von Graenloea Switzerland, 1:5239. 

WOMENS DOWNHILL 
Results of race on Sunday ta Whistler, Cana- 
da: l, Katta S e telnger. Germany. 1 minute 
saw seconds; Z Pernllia Wlberg, Swednv 
1 5195; ft Michel le Rutftvwv CoiKXfcv 1 :52JB; 

4. Kate Pace. Canada 1:52.15; ft VrenJ 
Schneider, Swttzeriand, 1:S2A6; ftHoM Zur- 
briggen, Swftzeriand. 1:5258; 7. Melanie Sa- 
chet Francs, 1:5273; ft Hilary Linda UA, 
15278; 9, Kerrtn Lev-Go finer, Cmiada, 
15253; 1ft Bfbtana Perez, Italy, 1:5256 


HOCKEY 

Nattana) Heckcv League 
OTTAWA— Recalled Robert Burakovsky, 
right wtna m) Francois Leroux and Kevin 
MacDonald, defe ns e men, from Prince Ed- 
ward istana AHI_ 

PHILADELPHIA— Traded Claude Balvta, 
toft wing, and Khk Douberaaeck. goalie, to 
Ottawa for Mark Lamb, center. 

COLLEGE 

DE PAUL— Suspended Tam KJekndimML 
ba ske tb a ll guard, fori game tor tak i ng port In 
altercation outside a Chicago Tavern. 

FURMAN— Butch Estes, men's basketball 
coach, resigned. 

INDIANA ST-Flred Tates Locke, men's 
basketball ooacti. 

IOWA ST— Will drop merfs gymnastics and 
tennis and add women's soccer. 

MONTCLAI R ST— Named Leaoder Knight 
Interim tradiand field cnoch. Moreen Cassidy 
assistant track and field coach and Robin 
Curcuni menu tennis coorti 
NEWHAMPSHIRE— Susoended Rob Don- 
avon for war d , and Mike Hebike,gaattendir, 
Inde fi n i tely, and Tom Nolan, forward, for i 
week, from hockey team tar offcompus fight. 

NORTHERN ARIZONA— Announced the 
resignation of Harold Merritt, men's basket- 
ball coach, effective at the end ot the season. 

NORTHERN ARIZONA— Thurmond 

Moore, assistant football c o ach , resigned, ta 
became running backs coach at Utah State. 

PlTTSBU RGH— Contract ot Paul Evans, 
mows basketball coach, will not be renewed. 

RADFORD— Named Lisa O’Brien woman's 
soccer coach and Spencer Smith men's soccer 
coach. 

ST. AUGUSTINE'S— Horvw Heorttev, 
men's basketball coach, resigned. 

5T. JOSEPH'S— Named Tom Marechak 
men's assistant lacrosse coach. 

SAMFORD— Named Roger Carr quarter- 
bocks and wide reootvers coach. 

SOUTH ALABAMA — Nomed Steven Sortie 
monte assistant soccer eoodi and Karan 
HarMman women* assistant soccer coach. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 7, 1994 


Page 17 


:SBehtK 'W> 

F r ei , ^t^Jl 

*•— Micia-; J,-.- , 


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hyCasr. *^V! ’=*c H 

fdac sad r.V ; 

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H u N D A V 

SPORTS 

Nyberg Conquers 
iSuper-G, Downhill 

Won by Seizinger 


Ceupikdfy Our Staff Frm Dispatch*, 
ASPEN, Colorado — Fredrik 


Cary Mullen of Canady got his 

iri n; ? j < . ®r 


‘=C Tft = p* f 




"cg** y^~T-' 
Br-.s v- ; 

•J5S 5*- ' 


1 UM-. • 

wcnn : o 


T™ r^l World Cup vtoo^ou' sitS 

«^^wo£ s l X 

no. .O rally Si f K 
place and wm his second World „ „ 

Cup giant slalom this season. Mullen was tuned in 1 minute, 

Nybtag finished with a com- secfH)ds - AtJe Skaardal of 
bined tune of 1 minute, 51.26 N . orw ay was second in 1:3826, 
onds, 20 of a second ah^d & wth Pietro Vitalini of Italy third in 
Christian Mayer of Austria. Mat- 1:38 - 2a 



Purdue Nips Michigan 
To Move Atop Big 10 




Christian Mayer of Austria. Mat- 
uo Bdfrond of Italy was third in 
1:50.50. 


Mullen said be probably could 
have gone even faster because “I 


Nyberg, who also woo two giant went a little rounder than I needed 
slaloms in 1990, said he really liked ,0 - 1 had a really dean ran.” 

!^ X S!? 4 ^f alitW !f ea ? ierf ? r 01 y“P* gold medal winner 
htm the second run, despite the Tommy Moe of the United States, 


snow and fog. 


to. 1 had a really dean ran.” 

Olympic gold medal winner 
Tommy Moe of the United States, 
who was a disappointing 55th- 


n- -r: ^ 

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«T k.J ... . . "“ v a. UUOULAimUUK JJUl- 

S ^ d ^ with no place finisher FridaV magged to 
1 j get into the top 20 <mSawrday 

Few others would agree, espe- with a time of 1 :39.5a 
aafly .after one of the workers th. ~ a™ ~ 


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grooming the course mm Wed down H ® Mounla ® 

R before the second run. detenorated quickly in the sun- 

. .«■»■* of France, who 


led after the first ran, said it was 


two do wnhills scheduled here. But 
Mullen said the course was 


“very hard to see. Every turn felt m ,1“ ine o C 0 a L se was 
Kke ft was bump ” smoother and faster Saturday. 

Piccard finished fourth in He soared through tbe flats at 
1:51.63, ahead of Urs Kaelin of the top of the hill, a quagmire for 
Switzerland (1 :57.67), Alberto “““V skiers in the softening snow. 


Tomba (1:51.87). 


Near the bottom, Mullen hooked 


-?:««■ 


Tomba, who had dinner Satur- 80 but made it look as though 
day night with 1973 Miss World- il nevcr happened. 

USA Lynda Carter, complained Hannes Tri nkl , the Austrian ski- 

that “9 o’clock is too earl/’ for a er who won tbe dow nhill Friday, 
start. fell halfway down the ran Saturday 

can't sld weS in the morning,” while apparently headed fora first- 
hc said. place finish. 

“That’s sports,” he said. “My ski 

slipped out.” 

Pf/IA# *Ka^a Seizinger of Gennany 

iJlUllliy XiUf moved a Stq) closer to claiming her 

J J third straight World Cup downhill 

J) rj f crown by beating PemiUa Wiberg 

dv Uiazabal ^ s r dB, 1 s ,, f riy B a r i“^ ond 

J Sunday in Whist] a - , British Colum- 

X V/ * nr PP bia,for her second downhill vicuuy 

WmsrlaYoff «'*—» 

J vJ The Olympic downhill champion 

completed Ihc ZgOO-mctcr conrsc 


SteadyFlay 
ByOlazabal 
Wins Playoff 



Douj, CoOKT/Afoot itanchnc 

Harold Minor flew by Ihe^ 76ers's Chreooe Weatherspoon for two as the Heat won a seventh straight 


The Associated Press 

Glenn Robinson scored 37 
points Sunday, including a driving 
jumper with 63 seconds to play 
that gave No. 9 Purdue a 95-94 
victory over No. 3 Michigan and 
moved the Boilermakers into first 
place in tbe Big Ten. 

Michigan led 94-87 with 1:37 to 
play, but Purdue’s Matt Waddell 
hit a 3-pointer with 1:20 left and 
Robinson got the Boilermakers 
(25-4. 13-4 Big Ten) within one 
with a three-point play with 49 sec- 
onds left. 

JaJen Rose of Michigan (20-6, 
12-4) missed a 3-pointer with 35 
seconds left, but Ray Jackson 
grabbed the rebound and Michigan 
passed the bah around waiting to 
g£t fouled. Purdue didn’t foul and 
Rose's pass to Jimmy King went 
off his hands and out of bounds 
with 103 seconds left. 

Robinson, the nation’s leading 
scorer with a 29.4 average, took an 
inbounds pass near midcoun, took 
two dribbles and then hit the game- 
winner. 

Purdue has one game left, at 
home against Illinois, and Michi- 
gan has Pam State at home and 
Northwestern on the road. 

No. 1 Arkansas 80, Mississippi 
State 62: Corliss Williamson, a 
bad-tumed-good free throw shoot- 
er, made 5 of 6 in the final minu tes 
and added two late field goals as 
the Razorbacks (24-2, 14-2), play- 
ing at home, clinched their second 
Southeastern Conference champi- 
onship in three years. 

Williamson, a 60 percent free- 
throw shooter until a couple of 
weeks ago. has made 40 of his last 


44, making 13 of 15 against the No. 6 Missouri 80, Nebraska 78: 
Bulldogs (17-9, 9-7). He finished Missouri, playing at home, got its 
with 27 points. unbeaten Big Eight season tbe hard 

No. 5 North Carofina 87, No. 2 way, needing Melvin Booker's 
Duke 77: Donald Wnfiaras scored three-point play with 123 seconds 


seven points in less than three mm- 
uies as North Carolina broke open 


left for a victory over Nebraska. 
The sixth- ranked Tigers (24-2 


a close game at home on the way to overall, 14-0 Big Eight) became the 
— —— ■ first conference school in 23 years 


COLLEGE BASKETBALL p eaditeam twice. EricPiat- 

kowsla had 26 points for Nebraska 

a sweep of the season series over (17-9, 7-7). 

Duke. South Carolina 75, No. 7 Ken- 

Duke (22-4, 124) had already tu&y 74: In Columbia, South Car- 
clinched the Atlantic Coast Con- obna. Emmeu Hall’s layup with 
ference title and the Tar Heels (24- three seconds left gave South Caro- 
6 , 1 1-5) had locked up second lina tbe upset, 
place. Hall had 20 points and the 

Duke was within 77-72 with 4: 19 Gamecocks (8-18, 4-12 Soutbeast- 
to play when Williams, who has cm Conference) overcame a 12- 
becn bothered by various injuries point second-half deficit for only 
this season and has iwwH nine their third victory in 13 games. Ro- 
games, hit a driving jumper and drick Rhodes had 24 points for 
then a turnaround from the foul Kentucky (23-6, 124). 
line. Jeff Maclimis sandwiched N& 8 Arizona 85, Washington 
jumpers around a free throw by State 69: Khalid Reeves scored 2 1 - 
Grant HOI and the Tar Heds were second-half points as Arizona came 


up 85-73 with 2:03 to play. 


from behind at home to clinch a 


No, 4 C offlHrf i ffl t 95, St John's share of its fifth straight Pao-10 
80: In Hartford, Connecticut, Don- title. 

yell Ma rshall broke the Big East’s Reeves, a senior guard, scored 
regular-season scorin g record as nine straight points as the Wildcats 
Connec ticut became tbe winnin- (25-4, 14-3) pulled ahead 52-47 af- 


gest team in league history. 


ter trailing 35-30 at halftime. 


Marshall, who entered the game Washington Slate (18-10, 8 - 8 ) 
with 432 points, scored 29, break- scored only two field goals during 
ing the scoring marie of 435 set by that 7:23 span. 

Providence's Eric Murdock in No. 14 Syracuse 8 L, Georgetown 
1990-91 with his second basket, a 75: Lawrence Molen scored 26 
dunk that gave the Huskies a 13-10 points to lead No. 14 Syracuse (o a 
lead. Doron Sbeffer added a ca- Big East victory, dimming George- 
reer-high 25 points for Connecticut town’s chances for an NCAA tour- 


(26-3. 16-2 Big East). The Redmen namentbid. 

finished the season 11- 16, their first Adrian Autry, who had 21 


losing season since 1962-63. 


Manning Squeezes Hawks, Now 6-0, Past Pacers 


The Associated Press 


The Atlanta Hawks with Danny 


WO' -%*v. • : 
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Compiled by Ov Staff From Dispatches Manning « ^perfect 

TORREVIEJA, Spain — Jos*- was timed in 1 : 5 1.95, with Michdle , M an n ing drove from 
Maria CHazabal of Spain won his Rnthven third in 1 32.05. for the wmmng layup wit) 

first European golf tournament in Ruthven’s teammate, Kate Pace, lot, then blocked a 
" * - ' “ was fourth in 1:5115. Korin Lee- 


joined the team in a trade for Dom- 
inique Willems. 

Manning blocked Scott’s shot 


tens turned a close game against 
Los Angeles into a rout. 

Kenny Smith scored 13 of his 24 


of their last 23 games, have lost 10 DinoRadja had 36 points and 15 

straight on tbe road. rebounds — both highs in his rook- 

BuDets 124, Lakers 118: Michael ie year — and tbe Celtics broke a 
Adams set a team record with six 3- 13-game losing streak — longest in 
point baskets, and Washington, their storied history — with a 109- 
plaving at home, scored a season- 99 victory over the Los Angeles 


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x = - Sunday after Paul McGinley of Ire- 

l.jjj land threw away a three-shot lead 
- . on the last two holes of the Medi- 

terranean Open. 

' . It was the same tournament that 

' Olazabal last won, in 1992. 

- “My game is not yet perfect but 

... now I can see the fight,” he said 

‘ after carding 70 to fimrii at 276, 12 
-■ ■-**' under par. 

' : • ‘IT-f ’ The overnight leader, Gordon J. 
’ Brand, and fellow Briton Peter 

Baker finished tied for third at 278. 

■ ’ • ~ McGinley, who has never won a 

.. - ~ European KjA event, let nerves get 

■ the better of him. A bad shot at the 
: . r :Zi 235-yard 17th bole cost him a dou- 
' - ■ - ble bogey and a hooked shot at the 

-• ^ ^ ~ last saw him drop another shot as 
• • . be also finish with a 70. 

In the play-off, after both men 
e.i** had three-putted the short 17th, 
^ ‘ Olazdbal sank a 25-foot (7.6-mew) 

« birdie putt at the 18th. 

* ' “1 never thought 1 would win 

' "• ’r " until I saw Paul take a wood at the 
. .“’I-- - 17th when he was three shots dear 
.r- ^ , and I thought be would make a 

i - UHStake.*' CHazabal said. 

Z McGinley explained that he 

“had to wait for 20 minutes on tbe 
- tee before I could late my shot and 

my min d wandered. But I knew it 
— was a one-iron with the wind blow- 
„ ing as it was. But I don’t cany a 

'* : r one-iron and went with my frve- 
- . ' wood. 1 didn’t hit a good shot and it 
finiriied right against a stone which 
1 could not move." 

“Then I hooted my ball onto a 
; sandy lie ” he said, “and hit anoth- 

. J. er bad shot against the wall near to 

the green for another five to let Jos* 

AV ■ * {aria back in the game." 

^ j • Sparked by an eagle 3 on the 
first hole of the third round, Billy 
Andrade cruised to a 6 -under-par 
66 and look a two-stroke lead into 
Sunday’s final round of the Doral- 
Ryder Opai in MiamL 
• Fred Couples, who was seven 

shots behind, injured his back 

while warming up Sunday and 
withdrew before starting the final 

« Andrade 5 chief challenger in the 

■ $1.4 million event was Larry Nd- 


Manning drove from midcourt 
for tbe winning layup with 73 sec- 
onds left, then blocked a shot by 
Byron Scott to give Atlanta a 90-88 


with 3.0 seconds left to preserve the points in the third quarter^ when 
vfc ftX Y the Rockets outscored the Clippers 

Manning finished with 17 points, by 37-23. Houston had a season- 
12 rebounds and a career-high six 


Ctertncr^of Canada finished ninth NBA HIGHLIGHTS 

It was tbe last downhill for Lee- VU J°? r ‘ , 3 SPH 

Gartner, 27. who announced her M y «“ overplayed me and I refunds and Btajdot* 24 pomes 
retirement Thursday Tbe 1992 had to go to half court to get the and 10 assists for the Hawks, who 
downhffl Olympic gold medalist baU,” Manning said. “1 had him on have won nme straight at home, 
wffl race the three super-aunt sla- ruy hqpandl thought if I could get Jazz ia5f Mavericks 90= Karl 
lf wryt r minininp rwi the World Cup m to the^paint I could dish it to Malone had 34 points and 1! 
schedule, Kevin Willis for a dank But when 1 bounds, helping Utah extern 


Rain and warm temperatures 
forced the cancellation of three 
training runs during the week and 
the downhill a race scheduled for 
Saturday. But Sunday dawned 
crisp and dear, freezing the Dave 
Murray course, and some coaches 
suggested that two races be held. 
But that plan was dashed because 
most of the skiers were leaving for 
races in the United States. 

(AP.NYT) 


PI >--TTTT: 


night, the Hawks’ sixth consecutive 
victory. 

“My man overplayed me and I 
had to go to half court to get the 
hall ” Manning said. “1 had him on 
my hip and 1 thought if I could get 
into the^ paint I could dish it to 
Kevin Willis for a dunk. But when 1 
got to tbe foul fine, I t hough t I 
could make the shot.” 

The Pacers, who won 14 of their 
previous 16 games, led 86-83 with 
2:08 left before a layup by WnHs 
and Mookie Blaylock’s 3-pointer 
put the Hawks ahead 88 - 86 . 

Dale Davis tied it with a dunk 
for Indiana before Craig Ehlo in- 
bounded to Manning at midcourt, 
and he drove to the basket, giving 
the Hawks a 4-0 record since he 


high 16 steals. 

SuperSonics 114, Kings 98: 
Shawn Kemp had 25 points and 14 
rebounds and sparked a 34-19 
third-quarter rally that lifted Seat- 
tle over Sacramento. 

The Sonics won their fourth 
straight and beat the Kings for the 
seventh straight time. Seattle im- 
proved to 23-3 at home and 41-14 


point baskets, and Washington, their storied history - 
olavina at home, scored a season- 99 victory over the 


71 points in the first half Lakers on Friday night. 


against Los Angeles. 


I looked at the dock and was 


points, and Moten each sank a pair 
of free throws in the final eight 
seconds to seal the victory, which 
gave the Orangemen (21-5, 13-5) 
sole possession of second place in 
the conference. 

Georgetown, 10-7 in the Big 
East, was led by Othella Harring- 
ton’s 19 points. The Hoyas fell to 
16-9, but have only 14 victories 
against Division I opponents. 

No. 24 A tohama -Bi mringfoini 85, 
No. 16 Saint Lochs 70: Alabama- 
Birmingham, (22-6 overall, 84 
Great Midwest), dosed out the reg- 


The Bulle ts te ot advanteg of wandering, ‘When is tile game E- KSEKEBBSK 


Malone had 34 points and 13 re- ^boSiebS to teNBX. 


bounds, helping Utah extend its 
season-best winning streak to right 


Kemp didn’t start because of a 
sore right elbow, but the All-Star 


games with a victor y over home- f orwarc j made his presence felt, es- 
team Dallas. pedally in the third quarter when 

Malone made 14 of 21 shots and he scored 14 points, 
fell one point short of matching his Warriors 129, Hornets 112: La- 


season high for scoring as the Jazz 


pushed their winning streak against fast 15 shots, led Golden State’s 


the Mavericks to 13 straight. 


who missed 13 of his 


Adams scorea 1 / onus points m a bad team,” Boston veteran Ed 

the period. Pinckney said. 

Meanwhile, Clyde Drexler 
Glen Rice scored 32 pomts as the 27 ^ Portland beat 

H ^ 1 Chicago 1 1?96, its fourth consecu- 

emh straight game and handed afl at home, and their axth 

Philadelphia Ils i2lfa COQSecut,ve defeat in eight games at Chicago 

It was the largest victory margin n , , 

in Heat history. The previous mark The Bulls had won 17 consecu- 
was a 35-point rout of the Los An- &ve E 3 ? 1 ® w “° mc before their 
geles Clippers on Feb. 2, 1990. rccent sh± 


decisive third quarter with 14 


Rony Srikaly hit his first eight 
shots for Miami and scored 22 
points on 9-for-13 shooting. 


Rockets 124, Cfippos 107: Ha- points, and the Warriors handed ' • While tbe Chicago Bulls’ pnz- Bulls with 22 pewits. “Our offense 
keem Olajuwon had 30 points and Charlottteils 16th loss in 17 games, zling woes at home continued, the is at a standsluL We have to find it 
10 rebounds in Houston as a 194 The Hornets, who have allowed Boston Celtics’ nightmarish losing playing defense, and we’re not 
run in the second and third quar- fewer than 100 pants in only two streak finally came to an end. stopping anybody." 


recent skid. 

“At this stage, we don’t know 
what i£ going on with our balldub,” 
said Scottie Pi ppm, who led the 
Bulls with 22 points. “Our offense 
is at a standsluL We have to find it 


Jackson Sets 60-Meter Hurdles Mark 

SINDELFENGEN, Germany (Reuters) — Colin Jackson of Britain set 
a world indoor record of 730 seconds in the 60- meter hurdles at an 
international athletics meeting Sunday. 

Jackson broke the previous mark of 7 36 seconds, shared by himself 
and Greg Foster of the United States. 

Kentucky Derby Favorite Is Injured 

HALLANDALE. Florida (NYT) — Dehere. last year’sjuvenik cham- 
pion and the earlv favorite to win the Kentucky Derby, fractured a bone 
above his right hind ankle during a workout Friday and was withdrawn 
from racing in the Triple Crown series and possibly bey (rad. 

The 3-year-old colt was booked for smgoy on Tuesday; his future 
won’t be known until then. 

For the Record 

The United Arab Emirates won tbe ICC Trophy by beating Kenya by 
two wickets Sunday in Nairobi; tbe Netherlands qualified for the 1996 
World Cup by defeating Bermuda on Saturday. (Reiners) 

Art ScMichfer, the quarterback twice suspended by the NFL for 
P pmhKn o was indicted in Cincinnati on felony charges he stole more than 
550,000 nom a bank and two individuals. (AP) 

Oscar De La Hoya, America’s only boring gold medalist at the 1992 
Olympics, woo the WBO junior lightweight title in Los Angles with a 
lOth-round knockout of Jnnmi Bredahl of Denmark. (AP) 

Gianfranco Rosi of Italy kept the IBF junior middleweight title on a 
technical draw in Las Vegas after being badly cut over tbe left eye when 
>,<. hnmned heads with Vincent Pettway of the United States. (AP) 




W-’ • 

gay?-, * **'t' 


1 1 ' ; v ■ % m w 

% mm •'* ;i 
ZJrnmZ WMB 


wm mi 




“ - ' ^ \;m ~ 

JlJUS. 


lohn B c enneTThe AaodMtd Press 


son, who shot a 69. (Reuters, AP) he bumped beads with Vincent Pettway of 


A RECORD, A FALL — Jackie Joyner-Kersee, who had set a U.S. long-jump record of 23 feet, 4% inches (7.13 meters) at the 
USA-MobO Indoor Championships in Atlanta, fefl over die final hurdle In the 60-meter race Saturday night She was taken to a 
hospital for X-rays of her left ankle, but the results were not dmdged. “I don't know what happened," Joyner-Kereee said. 


8 ? 

JhS 


>*r ' 

-. 7 "p- • 

r ^ ■ T V ^ 

r' i '7m 


After a 40 - Year Career, Van Breda Koljf Nears His Last Technical 

By Jason Diaxnos 


By Jason Diamos 

Sew York Times Service 

AMHERST, New York — v “ 
Breda Kolff sits hunched over, chomping 

gum, annsfolded^^g 

intendy from the adehne as his Hofstia 
team — his last team — wm op for 
perhaps his last time as a coach. 

The 71-vear-dd tampda*. 
coach in NCAA Dnnaofl I baskclbafl. 


pionship. It has been 29 years since he But there are flashes, in this fint-round 

coached an Ivy League team with a future game between Hofstra and Chicago 
U.S. senator named Bill Bradley as its State, two teems with uninspiring re- 
star into the Final Four. It might as well . cords. Van Breda Kolff always jockeys 
be millions. tbe refs. By the end of the first half, be is 

And yet van Breda Kolff does not starting to get worked up. And the im- 
ynind His bead-coachiim career, span-, pulse to get up out of the seat finally 
ning over 40 years and ranging from proves too great 


last time as a coach. college to the pros to an lu-iatea women s “One doctor didn’t really want me to 

.j iconoclast, the oldest league to a Gulf Coast high school and come up here,” van Breda Kolff said later 
raa . nEsion I basketball, feick to college again, ended here in Sun- with a shrug. “Another said, ‘Just stay 
these days, his d- day’s final. Its significance; he says, is for calm.’ I really thought I was going to. 
rfSSusrt frame stooping a others to decide. He can’t; it's not his nature. Van Breda 

[i.y-meraj midsection. “I don’t care if there’s only 100 people Kolff has been bothered by an irregular 


from the man who used to lead tbe pros in 
whnirak on a regular basis. 

Bui it serves ils purpose. By the end of 
the game- Hofstra is getting the calls. The 
Flying Dutchmen hold on for a victory, 
and van Breda Kolff gets to coach for at 
least one more night. 

“I gel a little out of breath from time to 

* k. af?Ar»narH u Riri T think I 


Bradley was. I didn’t recruit him. And 
this me guy with dark hair gets up and 
asks two or three questions. I say. ‘Are 
you BracfleyT And he says. 7 * 10 , Fm Bfll 
Howard. 1 play for the football team.”’ 

Van Breda Kolff would come to brow 


Detroit, Phoenix, Memphis in the Ameri- 
can Basketball Association, the expan- 
sion New Orleans Jazz. Thai there was 
the University of New Orleans as coach 
and athletic director, the New Orleans 
Pride of the women’s league, seffing tug- 
boats door-to-door — “Guys wanted to 
talk basketball; 1 don’t think 1 ever sold 


walks more unsteadily uiesc ~ 

foot-3-tocb (1.9-mew).fn“iWSJ 

ItaJe over ^ PJJfSjj Jit “{he 9 , 000 -seat in the stands,’’ says van Breda KdfL, 
^frtiudvasity of Buf fa- pointing to his bench. “You have 12 here. 
Ahrnm Arena at Ws &e important thing to met” 

lo — site of the East ‘ le ^ Ffida y evening, Willem Hendrik 

van Breda ‘Kolff, dad in a faded red 
yii’ SJSducti^ van Breda sweater and navy slacks, is almost sedate, 

dank. During SxL And for- his voice occasioiially booming out m a 

KolfTs name “ ^P 1 ^? dmeouts baritone from his seated position. The 

get television. They tax venerable coach looks weak: an ambu- 

r r**nturv since lance is on call just for him. 

It has been a ^ 1 1 is a far ay f rads ^mated, ny, 

the man who benched wm ^ stop-gesnculaung, chair-facking, side- 

in the fourth quarter of uamc line-pacing, expletive-spewing Batch of 

Nrionto MMtd L*KS 3 d dt- days gone by. 
came within two points oi a 


least one more night, Bradley quickly enough. Three years af- boats door-to-door — Guys wanted to 

“I get a little out of breath from lime to ter his sou’s departure, tbe coach made a talk basketball; I don’t think I ever sold 
time,” he says afterward. “But I think I decision that would profoundly change’ anything”— and even a year at the high 
was feeling better as the dock ran down.” his life: He decided to jump to the Los school level 
In the more than 1300 games that van Angeles Lakers. “Everyone in their lifetime should 

Breda Kolff has coached, he has felt bet- “I don’t mind moving,” van Breda spend one year of their Kfe in Picayune, 
ter as the clock ran down more often than Kolff says now. “You always meet nice Mississippi, teaching 10th-grade world 


heartbeat for eight years now. He was 
hospitalized on Feb. 21, and this is his 


in it, a ghost town by bastetbaO*^ 
dank During introductions, van Breda 
KolfTs name is mispronounced. AncUo 
get television. Dtev take radio timeouts 


It has been »qg*r rf ■ gJJgfiS 
the man who benched 


hospitalized on Feb. 21, and this is ms 

fust game back. 

The second half is vintage van Breda 
Kolff, doctor w no doctor. His peppering 
of the refs readies a crescendo. Hofstra, 
which has led by as many as 1 9, is starting 
to fold. “Damn you,” van Breda Kolff 
finally says to one official. The official 
wheels, blows bis whistle and there’s the 
technical — van Breda KolfTs trade- 
mark. 

“Believe it or not. that’s the first one 
I've taken this year ” he says. This coming 


In the more than 1300 games that van 
Breda Kolff has coached, he has felt bet- 
ter as the clock ran down more often than 
noL A native of Montclair, New Jersey, 
captain of the 1947 Princeton squad and 
member of the Knicks in their first four 
years of existence, he began coaching at 
Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylva- 
nia, in the 1951-52 season. 

Four seasons later, van Breda Kolff 
was en route to Hofstra, where his team 
would go 23-1 in 195940. Three more 
seasons and the job at Princeton would 

°*“When 1 first got there, I had a meeting 


outscoring the Billikens 30-10 over 
the final 12 minutes of the first half. 

Ohio State 82, No. 17 Indiana 78; 
Ohio State, playing ar home, over- 
came an 18-point first-half deficit 
and held Indiana without a field 
goal for a span of more than 11 
minutes in the second half. 

Lawrence Funderburke, who 
started his college career at Indiana 
before transferring to Ohio State, 
scared 25 points to lead the Buck- 
eyes. The loss knocked the Hoo- 
siers (18-7) two games back of Big 
Ten leader Michigan going into the 
last week of conference play. Ohio 
State (12-15, 5-11 Big Ten) had lost 
its last two games, five of its last six 
and eight of 10 . 

No. 18 Minnesota 107, Iowa 96: 
Townsend Orr scored six of ins 12 
points in the third overtime and 
Voshon Lenard had a career-high 
38 points as Minnesota, playing at 
home, recorded consecutive 20 -win 
seasons for the first time ever. 

Lenard became the fifth all-time 
scorer for the Gophers (20-10, 10-7 
Big Ten). 

Nft 19 Florida 82, Tennessee 71: 
Dan Cross scored 14 points during 
a five-minute stretch of the second 
half as Florida, at home, tied Ken- 
tucky for first place in tbe South- 
eastern Conference Eastern Divi- 
sion. 

Since the Gators (23-6, 12-4 
SEC) have a belter record within 
the division, they will be the No. 1 
seed from the East in next week's 
SEC Tournament at Memphis, 
Tennessee. 

No. 20 California 74, Oregon 
State 44: Lamond Murray had 18 
points as the Bears knocked off 
cold-shooting Oregon. 

In what may have been the last 
home game for Murray, a junior, 
and sophomore teammate Jason 
Kidd — both are likely candidates 
to enter the NBA draft — neither 
player spent much time on the 
court after the Bears (21-6 overall, 
12-4 Pao-10) opened a 37-10 half- 
time lead. 

No. 21 Oklahoma State 83, Colo- 
rado 68 : Back-to-back 3-pointers 
by Randy Rutherford and Brooks 
Thompson started a late surge as 
Oklahoma State (21-8, 104) pulled 
away before a hometown crowd to 
beat Colorado despite a career- 
high 46 points by Donnie Boyce. 

No. 22 Muqnefte 73, Wisconsin* 
MBwankee 51: Damon Key had 17 
points, Roney Eford scored aD 16 
of his in the 1 second half and Jim 
McOvaine nearly had a triple-dou- 
ble to lead Marquette (22-7) past 
UWM in the regular season finale 
for both teams. 

Providence 77, No. 23 Boston 
College 69: Michael Brown scored 
22 pomts to lead Providence, play- 


and the people of the town.” he recalled. 
“Now 1 didn’t know who tbe hell Bill 


The first season in Los Angeles, 1967- 
68 , van Breda Kolff wok Jerry West, 
Elgin Baylor and not much more into the 
NBA finals. Then came die arrival of 
Chamberlain the next season and the 
controversy of Game 7, after which van 
Breda Kolff would call Chamberlain a 
quitter before eventually resi gning him- 
self. 

Was it the turning pant in his career? 

“Probably, depending on who you’re 
talking to,” van Breda Kolff replies. 

Regardless, it started off an odyssey in 
the professional ranks during the ’70s: 


“Everyone in their lifetime should College 69: Michael Brown scored 
spend one year of their life in Picayune, 22 pomts to lead Providence, play- 
Missisappi, teaching lOth-grade world ing at home against Boston College 
history. (20-9 overall 1 1-7 Big East). Provr- 

And then Lafayette, where everything dence (16-9, 9-8) also capitalized at 
had begun, asked van Breda Kolff bade, the foul line, hitting 14 consecutive 
Again, he built the Leopards into a win- foul shots and coasting to victory, 
ner before a second jump to Hofstra. Two No. 25 Perm 8 L CoraeH 66 : Matt 

seasons ago, van Breda Kolff worked his Maloney scored 19 points, 14 in the 
brand of magic and the Flying Dutchmen second half, to lead No. 25 Perm 
went 20-9. This season, there was no over Corned for the Quakers’ 28th 
magic. And now it’s over. straight league victory. Maloney, 

“People are always asking me; ‘If you who made 7 of 12 field goal at- 
had the chance to do it aflj)ver, would tempts, including 4-of-5 3 -poim 
you do anything different?"* van Breda shots, scored 1 1 poms during a 17- 
Kolff says. “1 ay, not a bit- 1 wouldn’t 5 run for the Quakers (23-2, 13-0 
change one thing. You do what you’re Ivy League) over the first 5:52 of 
going to do and make the best of il the second half 


straight league victoty. Maloney, 
who made 7 of 12 field goal at- 
tonpts. including 4-of-5 3-poim 
shots, scored 11 points duringa 17- 





Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY. MARCH 7, 1994 



Lacroix Explores Limits of Ready-to-Wear 


LANGUAGE 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — “Wonderful.” breathed So- 
phia Loren, black Dior-clad bosom heav- 
ing so hard that her veiled hat trembled. 

“Fabulous," drawled Lauren Bacall, 
blonde hair curling over her gray Armani 
pants suiL 

Kim Basinger just wore her heart on the 
lapel of a cranberry Christian Lacroix 
jacket and pouted glossy lips at Robert 
Altman’s cameras. 

The opening scenes of Altman’s “Pret- 
i-Porter” movie, shot at Lacroix's fall 

PARIS FASHION 

show on Sunday, caused a stampede of 
photographers, video crews and journal- 
ists. 

The spy-and-spoof movie — a satire on 
fashion as Altman’s “The Player" took on 
Hollywood — threatens to overwhelm the 
Paris ready-to-wear shows. But Lacroix 
tried hard to divert attention from Loren's 
still-luscious legs. 

The designer sent out a titanic dash of 
patterns, fabrics and decoration: bools 
smothered in jewels, metallic finishes, ti- 
ara-like headpieces and circus finale. That 
was the moment when Marcello M as- 
tro! an ni’s daughter Chiara. playing Ba- 
singer’s assistant, lifted her head momen- 
tarily from her book (or maybe it was the 
script) to look at a flirty skating dress. 

Had Altman asked Lacroix to make a 
show so over- the- lop that it was an embar- 
ras de nchessel Or was the designer, who 
came out lo introduce his Bazar sports- 
wear line, trying to show the outer parame- 
ters of ready-to-wear — from sporty to 
wildly opulent? 

The result seemed like fashion run riot 
in a forest of fabrics, with the occasional 
emergence of a simple jacket in a subtly 
figured brocade or an evening tuxedo with 
slithers of lace in the back of jacket and 
pants. Mostly Lacroix’s sublime individ- 
ual pieces, like chenille knits in juicy colors 
and rich textures, were never taken out of 
their complex context 

Long oyer short was the show's state- 
ment but it would typically come out as a 
striking coal over silver leather shorts, 
with leopard-print patterned chiffon and 
lacey hose, not to mention T-shirts photo- 

? rimed with the faces of the supennodels. 

he late Frederico Fellini, not Altman, 
would have done justice to the show. 

Fashion the Movie is an apt metaphor 
for a season that seems more than ever 
about a designer's intense personal vision 
— a private narrative in which the clothes 
are merely players. 

Imagine the scene at John Galliano's 





John Galliano’s fErty shorts and Japanese-inspired wrapper and headgear. 


powerful and romantic show, which look 
place in an empty mansion — all dusty 
gilded boiserie and a chandlier sprawled in 
a heap of glitter on the floor. 

Enter a black-veiled figure weeping into 
her hankerchief- point dress. Then out 
steps a dainty shoe, an elongated leg with 
'the curve of the buttocks just covered in 
the cheekiest silk shorts disappearing un- 
der a cuddly shearling jacket. Now a gei- 
sha girl, an obi swaddling the bosom of her 


tailored jacket, its sleeves flaring like a 
kimono. Next Shanghai LiL the shiny coils 
of her hat like upswept Japanese hair, a 
slinky bias-cut dress and a dangling purse. 
Finally came a bubble-gum pink satin 
dress caressing the body to wild applause. 

it was a fashion happening as Galliano's 
18 outfits spoke of romance and feminine 
allure, mixtures of cultures and textures 
and a flirtatious modernity. 

Galliano now needs the the big-bucks 


backer that his exceptional talent merits. 
At the show was its sponsor, the New York, 
financier John Bull of Paine Webber in- 
vestment bank Secret negotiations with 
the Wertheimer family (owners of Chanel) 
stalled because of a “conflict of interests." 
(Read that as fear of upsetting Karl Lager- 
feld). 

However disturbing the Comme des 
Gar cons’ show seemed, you have to salute 
the designer Rei Kawakubo for her ex- 
traordinary vision of women who. after 
some unimaginable event, were forced to 
dress themselves without scissors and 
thread by wrapping and rolling fabric 
around the body and by cutting up old 
army uniforms. 

The result was strange and beamiM a 
fashion version of swords beaten into 
■ plowshares. To martial music, the models 
walked out in ear-flapped army caps 
above dresses that lapped the body leaving 
a bared back, the end of the fabric in a 
sausage roll of fabric The cut-up uniforms 
meant a khaki military jacket reduced to 
two pockets on a ragged bolero, or to the 
bodice of a long dress with a blood-red 
velvet skirt. It seemed poetic, apocalyptic 
and symbolic of bow women the world 
over are left to pick up life's pieces. 

Yohji Yamamoto's show was an art 
movie, a fine intellectual exercise, its cere- 
bral side reinforced by the metal runway 
flanking the noble rotunda of the Sor- 
bonne. Yamamoto went back to his Japa- 
nese roots, using the kimono’s deep sleeves 
on long sober tailored coats or as sudden 
flashes of color and pattern to brighten Che 
somber palette. The multilayered kimono 
was even translated as colorful fine knitted 
cardigans worn like onion skins. 

Gaude Montana’s stride into cyber- 
space, ail abbreviated skirts and high 
boots, was a hard, futuristic vision that did 
not reflect the dreamy escapism of modem 
fashion times. 

So Montana had softened his silhou- 
ette? But making it round instead of 
square could not convince that he bad 
given up on fashion geometry. The show 
started and ended with fluffy while wool 
and a snowball of feathers to emphasize 
deep-pile fabrics. Long bathrobe coats in 
plush velvet, belted high at the waist, had a 
melting softness. 

Ann Demeulemeester told a tale of 
sweet misalliances: long wavy hair with 
funky, spiky fringes: thick long skirts over 
flimsy silk petticoats; heavy brogues with 
spindly heels. They stepped out at the 
Ecole des Beaux Arts on a mosaic floor 
dial echoed the textures of the brocade 
jackets or ankle sweeping coats. The sur- 
prise was short dresses — always with 
uneven hems or with a flutter of under-silk 
— and in pale colors from wishy sky blue 
to mushroom pink. 


Name-Droppers of Another Sort 


By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON — “Another highly recognizable 
name in Washington retailing will soon be histo- 
ry " Kara Sw is her wrote, with heavy heart, in The 
Washington Post, “when the owners of Peoples Drug 
Stores chop a name that has been around for almost 90 
years." 

“Peoples' is a warmly populist name, from the 
Latin popuhis. Mao Zedong recognized this when he 
named his regime the People’s Republic of China, 
differentiating it from the plain Republic of China 
what Kuominiang leaders were driven lo Taiwan. 
Lyndon Johnson once satirically spelled d out in a 
burst of oratory: “the people — p-e-e-p-u-L" Abraham 
Lincoln drew on the phrase- makin g of the Reverend 
Theodore Parker for ins “of the people, by the people, 
for the people” in the Gettysburg .Address. Further 
back, the framers of the U.S. Constitution led their 
document with “We, the people," a democratic phrase 
that drew a strenuous objection from Patrick Henry of 
Virginia, who preferred “We. the Stales.” 

Building on that great tradition for nearly a century. 
Peoples Drug Stores invested millions of ad dollars in 
the Firm's name. Its 270 stores proudly proclaim the 
populist message. What terrific idea for a name could 
account for the scrapping of the familiar old “Peoples"? 

Answer CVS Stores. In case CVS does not instantly 
grab you, consider this: CVS is the name of the 
corporate parent, which already operates 900 drug- 
stores in the Northeast under that name, and which 
bought the Peoples chain a few years ago- Its presi- 
dent, Thomas Ryan, fixed up the old stores and is 
obfiteraung the old name “to show more clearly who 
was behind these changes.” 

CVS does not stand for Columbia Voadcasling 
System, as many assume. The initials stand for “con- 
venience, value, service;” though these three words do 
not leap readily to mind when the initials appear. 
“Why isn't CVS referred to as Consumer Value Stores 
if that’s the image the company wants to convey?" 
asks David Metcalf, an advertising copywriter for a 
Detroit bank. “If that’s too long, why not choose a 
more presentable name? There seems to be a serious 
lack of form following function here." 

Another question arises: Why change any f amiliar 
name to a set of unfamiliar initials? First National City 
Bank pidcsop a certain swiftness by shortening itself to 
Gtibank, but does the Farmer s and Merchants Rank 
attract new customers by becoming F&M7 Metcalf 
writes copy for NBD. winch used to take a whole two 
seconds to say as National Bank of Detroit. 

Some name-happy companies are moving in the 
opposite direction, from initials with forgotten ante- 
cedents to whole words: the Great Atlantic and Pacific 
Tea Co. was able to identify itself as A&P, though 
when the chain wants to get away from its old ima g e , it 
chooses the name of Super Fresh. (How soon S&F7) 

□ 

.Another, more understandable trend in corporate 
nomenclature is the run-on name. TdePrompTer led 
the way a generation ago — hyphenless, with internal 
letters capitalized instead. Others created a single 
word out of two: nameblends include Ameritecfa. 
Microsoft. Unisys. Which brings us to the 
MashreqBank. 


“Notice of Name Change" is the direct, even catchy 
headline of a tombstone ad in The New York Times. 
“MashreqBank (Formerly Bank of Oman Limited)" 
What was the matter with the friendly Mdghborho«U& 
“Bank of Oman." which we used to run into Wore 
going shopping at Peoples Drug? Only this: “It is 
incorporated in the United Arab Emirates and not in 
Oman.” Good reason! £ 

Jed Rothwell of Cold Fusion Research Advocates, 
in Chamblee. Georgia, has a theory for “a fad in which 
NamesAreRunTogetherUkeThis He thinks it was 
started, or at least popularized by. Niklaus Wiith, a 
computer scientist and designer of programming lan- ' 
guages. “When you tell a computer to add op your 
lunch bill with a 15 percent tip plus tax," Rothwell 
writes, “you write something like this: TOTAL equals 
sign LUNCH plus sign (LUNCH asterisk .15) plus 
sign TAX.” But if you have both federal and state or 
local taxes, you would have to write FEDERAL TAX, 
which would confuse the computer because it could 
discern no operator (like plus sign or minus sign or 
asterisk or slash) between the words as two variables. 

To lump Lhe words together into a single variable, 
Wirth wrote il as FederaJTax. “Many of us program- 
mer types have been doing it that way ever since,” says 
Rothwell. He adds: “We started calling our products 
FastFormaiter and TaxTirae; other people noticed 
and began imitating that style and, as they say. 
TheRestlsHistory." 

□ 

The Nitpickers' League bas demanded a critique of 
President Ginton-'s Slate of the Union address, which 
I have resisted because his writers have made a con- 
scious effort to clean up his act. 

So just a few precepts: do not sum a sentence with 
the conjunction so. as in “So this year ...” 

In enumerating, say “third” instead of the Bushian 
“the third thing.” 

Do not say “I am persuaded” when you mean “I am 
convinced”; it seems as if you were sold a bill of goods. 

“Democracies don't attack each other” should be 
“one another," referring to more than two. 

When positing anything contrary to fact, get sub 

junctively moody: “as though the world itself was” 
should be were. 

Run the whole thing through a clichfr-checker. Not 
all jobs need be targeted, all problems tackled, all 
campaigns launched. 

Alliteration acolytes liked “replaced drift and dead- 
lock with renewal and reform." And this adjuration to 
my old co-conspirator. Bob Dole, in his rebuttal: How 
often can you start a sentence with Now? Ronald 
Reagan could not get going without a Well, and Dole 
is trying the same thing with Now. As Gertrude Stein 
would say, drop the now now. 

New York Times Service 


IIYTERIVATIOIVAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Afipean on Page I / 


11 

*fS 

frad? hu 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


AiftJofdam 


Budapot 

Copwinn 

Casta Da Sol 

Dlitiki 

Edatbujyii 

Fkraica 

FianWut 

Geneva 

HftaWd 

tsanfaul 

LbUib 

Lisbon 

London 

MaAtd 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


St Pwembuy 
S be nJilm fci i 
&naboug 
Tafcwi 

Vonica 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

ZuWi 

Oceania 


Today 

Ml* Low W 
CT OF 
31 m 12/53 a 
5/48 7/44 ah 

4/39 -3/37 c 
10*1 6/43 a 

18** TIM pc 
11/M 4/39 c 

0/46 a/39 * 

12/53 7/44 irfi 

6/40 4/39 ah 

4/39 205 l 

20/66 11/52 a 
13/55 10/50 C 
11/52 6/40 c 

14/57 7/44 pc 

7/44 2/36 » 

12/53 4/39 pc 

-2/29 -5/24 vl 
6M0 4 m pc 

20/50 14/57 pa . 
19«6 11/52 » 
13Q6 6/46 ah 

19436 4/39 • : 

14/57 6/43 pc 

-5/24 44/18 *1 
9/46 307 nh 

16431 7/44 ■ 

5/41 -2/29 pc 
17/62 8/46 pc 

13/55 8/40 pc 

7/44 208 ab 

4/39 1/34 oh 

lB/64 7/44 pc 

■3*27 -3/27 an 
3/37 -2/29 I 
13/55 0/43 ah 

■ZIPS -4/25 ri 
12/53 7/44 po 

12/63 5/41 ah 

7/44 2/35 ah 

13/56 5/41 pc 


Low W 
OF 

13/55 pc 
M3 e 
-4/25 pc 
8/46 s 
i IP/33 pc 
6 M3 pc 
400 pc 
7/44 c 
8/43 pc 
1-34 PC 
1203 pc 
307 ah 
307 * 
T0<50 PC 
4/39 pc 
7«4 PC 
-4/25 pc 
307 pc 

1601 !K 
12/53 pC 
7/44 C 
6*45 pc 
9/48 PC 
-405 pc 
6*43 pc 
11/52 pc 
■4/25 c 
13/55 pc 
9/40 pc 
409 PC 
-ZIPS C 
10/50 1 
■405 c 
-e/29 pc 
0/49 pc 
-3/27 pc 
9«8 pc 
M3 pc 
205 pc 

0/48 re 




‘SW 5 ” KKjUiaBaao 
JeWraara 

North America 
There will be some raki Me 
Tuesday into Wednesday 
from New York Cily lo Wash- 
ington. D.C.. then It wffl be 
considerably colder Thurs- 
day. Chicago and Deuel «*9 
be quite cold during the mid- 
dle part of the week- Hous- 
ton will be warm Tuesday, 
Ihen much cooler Wednes- 
«hy 

Middle East 


ably ^(/mmoniiy ^ 

Europe 

Sunshine will warm haly, 
Spain, Portugal and south- 
ern France. Unseasonable 
warmth will spV over to such 
northern lands os England, 
Netherlands and Germany 
although wind and showers 
ore Hrely at midweek. Scot- 
land through southern Swe- 
den and Denmark will be 
windswept with showers. 


Asia 

Strong, cold winds will 
sweep from Bejjkig to Seoul 
into Wednesday. Japan wffl 
be windswept aBhough warm 
at First: Tuesday will have 
showers, even a thunder- 
storm. In Shanghai a chilly 
raki may W at wires; show- 
ers will wet Taiwan. Hong 
Kong will be sticky with a 
shower. 


21/70 14/57 pc 21/70 1467 pc 
29/73 10/84 pc 34/75 1 7*2 pc 


Latin America 

Today __ Tomorrow Today Tomorrow 

High Uw 77 Mgh Low W Mgh Unt W Mgh Low W 

C/FOFQFC/F OF OF OF OF 

Bekd 17*2 9*48 pc 1BA4 11/52 pc Bora Aim 32*0 19*6 a 32*9 23/71 pc 

Cairo 20*6 Mi a 19*0 6/43 pc Cams 20*4 23/73 pc 29*4 23/73 pc 

Damascus 13*5 306 pc 14/57 3*7 pc Uma 25/77 20*B «h 25/70 20*8 pc 

JetusoJom 14*7 0*43 pc 14/57 6*43 pc MadccCty 27*0 1203 a 26/79 9/46 pc 

Lon 26/70 6/43 a 20/79 4/39 pc RbdaJaralra 26/79 23/73 r 29/04 23773 pc 

Rlya* 29*2 12*3 a 20*2 10*1 pc Santiago 33/91 17*2 a 36/97 17*2 pc 

Legend: s-omny, popa/Py doudy. c-doudy, ah-showara. Hiund areta /ma, r-rata, sl-arow Buntes, 
sn-anow, (-ten, W- Wanner. M maps, forecasts and data provided by Accu-Weather, he. 9 1994 


Today 
Mgh Low 
OF CfF 
Bangkok 34/93 26/79 

Botyng 9*48 -7/20 

Hong Kang 23/73 17*2 

Mania 32/09 21/70 

NnrtMa 30*6 10*0 

SwjuI 12*3 3*7 

5Wdal 10*1 9M8 

Sngapom 31*8 34/75 

T«prJ 24/75 17*2 

Tokyo 11/52 5/41 


I 20/79 • 

1 -12/11 pc 

I 17*2 pc 
1 23/73 pc 
I 14/57 8 
I -5/24 pc 
I 5/41 pc 
I 24/76 pc 
I 17*2 pc 
’ 7/44 Mi 


Algiers 19*6 

Capo Town 23/73 

Cnadfenca 19/66 

Harm 22/71 

Urges 31*8 

rWrab 23/73 

Tunis 19*6 


11*2 a 19/66 
16/59 pc 27*0 
10*0 pc 19*0 
12*3 pc 28*2 
27*0 I 32*9 
11/52 pc 27*0 
8/40 • 21/70 


Worth America 

Andmsga -1*1 -< 

Altortj 21/70 1 

Bosk*: 9/48 1 

Oirago 3/37 < 

Oontior 5/41 -It 

(Mil* 6/43 -i 

fenokiu 27*0 21 

feu** 27*0 K 

LooAngotas 18*4 ! 

Monti 27*0 H 

Mkrawrda -1/31 -U 


NawYoilt 

Phconb 

SwiFran. 

Santa 

Torartio 

Washington 


ACROSS 

1 Dumbfounded 
5 Acquire, as 
expenses 
10 Singer 
Campbell 
14 Colombian city 
is Hughes's plane 

Spruce 

16 1690's Vice 
President — 
P. Morton 
17 1959 Rodgers 
and Hammer- 
stein hit 


20 "You can 

horse to..." 

21 Bridal path 

22 Predicament 

24 Obote's 
successor 
26i956Comden- 
Green-Styne 
collaboration 

33 On 

(counting 

calories) 

34 Man with a title 
33 Soviet space 

vehicle 


Solution to Puzzle of March 4 


□□HEU2I3Q □□□□□□ 
□□HHSQQHtDninnQias 
□□bbb shbiib □□□ 

BOB BDBB0 USnEI 

Gibb nan sbembb 

□□HIDE BBQBB 
□□□□□BBEiBBHBH 
aBBQB □□□□□ 
aaanaa bob bbd 
□B aa Hanna aaa 
□ HQ □□□SB LilBEIHB 
□□cjaoBHaaQBaauB 
QBHBBB BaaQBBB 
HBGIB HUM LldOl 


36 Pride and envy. 
b-9 

37 Old hat 

38 ‘Aurora* painter 

39 Kind of cap or 
cream 

40 Radio host of 
note 

41 First U.S. saint 
42 1930 Gershwin 

musical 

46 Sigma tism 

47 Achy 
4a Whiz krd 
si Blotto 

54 1983 Herman - 

Fl erstein musical 

60 "Metamor- 
phoses" poet 

61 Wish grantors 
82 TVs Oscar 
S3 Hitches 

64 Mill matenal 
ss Murder 
DOWN 

1 Pan ot a play 

2 Star of TV's 
“Wiseguy" 

3 "Waiting for the 

Robert ’ 

4 Puts out of 
commission 

s Desert critter 

b Persona 

grata 


7 how some 
packages are 
sent 

6 R.&R. org. 

9 Ring leader? 

10 Sticking 
together 

11 Decreaslngfy 

12 Demonic 

13 Garibaldi's 
birthplace 

18 Keats or Shelley 
is Popular street 
name 

23 Invent 

24 Snaps 
handcuffs on 

23 Gentle, as 
breezes 
28 Grounds 

27 Kingly decree 

28 Passenger ship 

29 Gobble 

30 " man with 

seven . . 

31 Curtain material 

32 Nine-to-five 
routine 

37 Conks out 

38 Mutinied 

41 comic 

(play type) 

43 Long narratives 

44 Alan, Larry or 
Stephen 


© New York Times Edited by Will Short z. 


amuHiiimhiifli 



Plata by UMK-JiaUn 


45 Tap-dance 52 Admval ZumwaJt 57 Prefix with lateral 

49 Crushing news 53 Actress Moore ss Omic/ons' 

55 Chicken's predecessors 

49 Four-star review counterpart 

ss Atmosphere ss Thesaurus 

50 ram Prefix listing: Abbr. 


mer 


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